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By Jonah Raskin | May 10, 1998
Some years fade fast. Others keep coming back again and again. More than any other single year in the last half-century, 1968 is the year nobody forgets, the year everyone remembers, the year when apocalypse and the millennium both reared their heads.Even in the midst of 1968, we knew it was special. I know I did. I was a professor of English literature at the State University of New York and at the same time a member of Students for a Democratic Society.Thirty years ago this spring, I was arrested and locked up in jail along with nearly 700 other protesters on the campus of Columbia University.
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NEWS
August 11, 2014
Erica Green 's recent article concerning the progressive pedagogy on tap at the Arts & Ideas Sudbury School details deeply troubling trends in education today ( "Mount Washington school redefines education," Aug. 7). Instead of insisting on the educator's authority in the classroom, school leaders misguidedly attempt to "democratize" the learning process. Their radical reforms (student proposed curricula, hiring decisions decided on by a student vote, etc.) do anything but. The tyranny of the child majority, comprised of young children still in the process of becoming, is far more oppressive than the command of any adult presence.
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NEWS
December 17, 1996
Jim Karayn, 64, a former television executive and pioneer of public broadcasting, died Thursday in Washington. He was the force behind the gavel-to-gavel coverage of the Senate Watergate hearings and live coverage of the president's annual State of the Union address.Mr. Karayn started as news director of KTLA-TV in Los Angeles and came to Washington in the 1960s as a producer with NBC News.He moved to PBS and helped persuade others to join, including Sander Vanocur and Robert McNeil.In 1976, he helped bring presidential election debates back to television.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 21, 2001
Showtime is promoting "Varian's War," its new film about an American intellectual who saves Jewish intellectuals from Hitler's Europe, as "the true story of the American Schindler." Given the immense popularity and revered status of "Schindler's List," who can blame Showtime for trying to forge that link in viewers' minds? But in some ways (and I know some readers are never going to believe me), "Varian's War" is a more interesting and enlightened film than "Schindler." The more interesting part involves a fascinatingly quirky and cerebral lead performance by William Hurt as Varian Fry, an American magazine editor appalled by Nazi barbarism who decides to do something about it at a time when much of the rest of America looked the other way during the late 1930s.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
Erica Green 's recent article concerning the progressive pedagogy on tap at the Arts & Ideas Sudbury School details deeply troubling trends in education today ( "Mount Washington school redefines education," Aug. 7). Instead of insisting on the educator's authority in the classroom, school leaders misguidedly attempt to "democratize" the learning process. Their radical reforms (student proposed curricula, hiring decisions decided on by a student vote, etc.) do anything but. The tyranny of the child majority, comprised of young children still in the process of becoming, is far more oppressive than the command of any adult presence.
NEWS
By George F. Will NTC | July 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In China and Kosovo, two of this century's durable arguments are resonating loudly. As a result, two thinkers not often thought of nowadays -- Hannah Arendt and Robert Lansing -- are again pertinent to U.S. foreign policy.Wages of tyrannyPresident Clinton and President Jiang Zemin delicately exchanged theories about the prerequisites of a nation's progress. Obliquely referring to the suppression ("resolute measures") of the 1989 Tiananmen Square demonstration for democracy, China's president said the suppression was necessary for "stability," which sustained China's progress.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | April 25, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- Gay marriage is the new issue du jour on the cutting-edge political menus. It's on all the talk shows and in all the ideological magazines, and it's floating around in the state legislatures, where it tends to bring out the worst of both its enemies and its advocates.Whether or not Hawaii, as it has been threatening to do, gives legislative sanction to the concept of same-sex marriages, and thereby forces the other 49 states to confront it as well, it's an idea we're going to hear discussed a lot in the months and years ahead.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 21, 2001
Showtime is promoting "Varian's War," its new film about an American intellectual who saves Jewish intellectuals from Hitler's Europe, as "the true story of the American Schindler." Given the immense popularity and revered status of "Schindler's List," who can blame Showtime for trying to forge that link in viewers' minds? But in some ways (and I know some readers are never going to believe me), "Varian's War" is a more interesting and enlightened film than "Schindler." The more interesting part involves a fascinatingly quirky and cerebral lead performance by William Hurt as Varian Fry, an American magazine editor appalled by Nazi barbarism who decides to do something about it at a time when much of the rest of America looked the other way during the late 1930s.
NEWS
October 7, 1997
Mary Jayne Gold, 88, an American socialite who helped painters Marc Chagall, Max Ernst and about 2,000 other Jews and anti-Nazis escape from France during World War II, died Sunday at her Riviera villa in Gassin, France.Ms. Gold, who bankrolled the flight of the artists and intellectuals, had suffered from pancreatic cancer, said her great-nephew, Thor Gold in Los Angeles.Others aided in their flight from the Nazis were sculptor Jacques Lipchitz, authors Franz Werfel, Hannah Arendt and Hans Habe, and Nobel prize-winning biochemist Otto Meyerhof.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 23, 1998
Based on Stephen King's novella of the same name, "Apt Pupil" stars Brad Renfro as Todd Bowden, a straight-A high school student who becomes obsessed with the Holocaust, and who in his research uncovers a former Nazi (Ian McKellan) right in his own sunny California town.Todd confronts the man, whose name is Kurt Dussander, but rather than turn him in to the "authorities" (in this case a globe-trotting Nazi hunter), he demands that Dussander tell him PTC everything about his odious enterprise.
NEWS
By George F. Will NTC | July 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In China and Kosovo, two of this century's durable arguments are resonating loudly. As a result, two thinkers not often thought of nowadays -- Hannah Arendt and Robert Lansing -- are again pertinent to U.S. foreign policy.Wages of tyrannyPresident Clinton and President Jiang Zemin delicately exchanged theories about the prerequisites of a nation's progress. Obliquely referring to the suppression ("resolute measures") of the 1989 Tiananmen Square demonstration for democracy, China's president said the suppression was necessary for "stability," which sustained China's progress.
NEWS
By Jonah Raskin | May 10, 1998
Some years fade fast. Others keep coming back again and again. More than any other single year in the last half-century, 1968 is the year nobody forgets, the year everyone remembers, the year when apocalypse and the millennium both reared their heads.Even in the midst of 1968, we knew it was special. I know I did. I was a professor of English literature at the State University of New York and at the same time a member of Students for a Democratic Society.Thirty years ago this spring, I was arrested and locked up in jail along with nearly 700 other protesters on the campus of Columbia University.
NEWS
December 17, 1996
Jim Karayn, 64, a former television executive and pioneer of public broadcasting, died Thursday in Washington. He was the force behind the gavel-to-gavel coverage of the Senate Watergate hearings and live coverage of the president's annual State of the Union address.Mr. Karayn started as news director of KTLA-TV in Los Angeles and came to Washington in the 1960s as a producer with NBC News.He moved to PBS and helped persuade others to join, including Sander Vanocur and Robert McNeil.In 1976, he helped bring presidential election debates back to television.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | April 25, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- Gay marriage is the new issue du jour on the cutting-edge political menus. It's on all the talk shows and in all the ideological magazines, and it's floating around in the state legislatures, where it tends to bring out the worst of both its enemies and its advocates.Whether or not Hawaii, as it has been threatening to do, gives legislative sanction to the concept of same-sex marriages, and thereby forces the other 49 states to confront it as well, it's an idea we're going to hear discussed a lot in the months and years ahead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 7, 1999
In the American world of ideas, Norman Podhoretz is a monumental figure, a man known both for the originality of his mind and the prickliness of his personality. Editor of the intellectual dreadnought Commentary for 35 years until 1995, at 69 he is still a dauntless warrior. Today a major conservative force, his voice and influence have been powerful for almost 50 years, moving though a wide but never capricious spectrum that included a long period on the radical left.Now he has produced, in a very personal memoir, a sort of intellectual history of America in the second half of the 20th century.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 7, 1994
Paris. -- The Paul Touvier trial in Paris was supposed to be another ''trial of the century,'' but has proved to be nothing of the kind. The people put on trial for the genocidal crimes disfiguring the 20th century have repeatedly proved to be moral mediocrities. None of them -- Mr. Touvier, Klaus Barbie, Adolf Eichmann, among others -- has demonstrated a stature appropriate to the evil of the events in which each figured.Mr. Touvier, officer of the wartime Vichy French political police, is charged with a ''crime against humanity'' for his part in the execution of seven Jewish hostages in 1944, in reprisal for the French Resistance's killing of the Vichy government's information minister.
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