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Hank Stram

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By Sam Farmer and Sam Farmer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 5, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Hank Stram, the most successful coach in American Football League history and a TV and radio broadcaster for nearly two decades, died yesterday in a suburban New Orleans hospital. He was 82. Stram had been in declining health for several years, and his family attributed the death to complications from diabetes. "Hank was the most important coach in the history of the American Football League," said Kansas City Chiefs owner Lamar Hunt, who hired Stram as the club's original coach when it began play as the Dallas Texans of the AFL in 1960 before the team moved to Missouri in 1963.
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By Sam Farmer and Sam Farmer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 5, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Hank Stram, the most successful coach in American Football League history and a TV and radio broadcaster for nearly two decades, died yesterday in a suburban New Orleans hospital. He was 82. Stram had been in declining health for several years, and his family attributed the death to complications from diabetes. "Hank was the most important coach in the history of the American Football League," said Kansas City Chiefs owner Lamar Hunt, who hired Stram as the club's original coach when it began play as the Dallas Texans of the AFL in 1960 before the team moved to Missouri in 1963.
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By MILTON KENT | January 26, 1995
Jack Buck and Hank Stram were each struck with one inescapable conclusion as they returned to their respective homes after calling the Dallas-San Francisco NFC championship game a couple Sundays ago for CBS Radio:Dallas was the better team."
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By MILTON KENT | January 26, 1995
Jack Buck and Hank Stram were each struck with one inescapable conclusion as they returned to their respective homes after calling the Dallas-San Francisco NFC championship game a couple Sundays ago for CBS Radio:Dallas was the better team."
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By Phil Jackman | January 4, 1993
The time was the early '70s, when the NFL, with unflinching cooperation from ABC, attempted to revamp the television-viewing habits of America in prime time.Nobody really expected "Monday Night Football" to soar through the ratings, laying to waste any programming the competing networks thrust in its path, much less be running strong two decades later.At the same time and with both football and television convinced they had tapped in on the second Comstock Lode, the folks over at CBS sensed an opening.
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By Phil Jackman | January 28, 1993
Super Talk:"Words don't win football games; people do." For emphasis, Hank Stram said it a couple of times and he backed it up with a story."After the very first Super Bowl game," said the former coach and now analyst for CBS Radio, "they came up and asked me what the difference was between us [Kansas City Chiefs] and the [victorious Green Bay] Packers. " 'Players like Fred 'The Hammer' Williamson shooting his mouth off,' I said."Three years later, the Chiefs and Stram were back at the big dance and this time they were a winner, clubbing Minnesota, 23-7."
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By Vito Stellino | October 25, 1992
Site: Metrodome, Minneapolis, 1 p.m.TV: Channels 11, 9Radio: WBAL (1090 AM), WTEM (570 AM)Line: Redskins by 2 1/2Last week: The Redskins beat the Philadelphia Eagles, 16-12, and the Vikings defeated the Detroit Lions, 31-14.Last meeting: Although the Vikings routed the Redskins, 30-0, in their final exhibition game in August, the last game that meant something between these two teams was the 1987 NFC title game. The Redskins beat the Vikings, 17-10, a month after the Redskins won a 27-24 overtime verdict in the Metrodome in the regular-season finale.
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By DAVE BARRY | March 1, 1992
A significant reason why the United States is having trouble competing in the modern industrialized world is that most Americans, through no fault of their own, are, in the words of U.S. Department of Education Secretary Lamar Alexander, "as dumb as fungus."That is why this newspaper, at great expense and physical risk, is once again presenting "Ask Mr. Language Person," the educational feature that answers common questions about grammar, spelling and punctuality.Today's first common question was mailed in by an actual reader, James F. Wood of Denver, Colo.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2003
Ravens owner Art Modell failed to repeat as a finalist this year as the Pro Football Hall of Fame narrowed its list to 15 yesterday. Last year, Modell was a finalist for the first time but was passed over after being one of the most heated topics of debate. Other finalists from last year who did not make the cut this time around were defensive end L.C. Greenwood, punter Ray Guy, defensive back Donnie Shell and coach Bill Parcells. Modell, 77, who enters his final season as Ravens owner, will likely return as a nominee for the Hall next year.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Peyton Manning found it harder to say goodbye to his teammates at Tennessee than to say hello to the riches of the NFL.In a startling decision that could hamper Bill Parcells' rebuilding program with the New York Jets and cost the Ravens pass rusher Peter Boulware, Manning announced yesterday he's passing up the 1997 NFL draft next month to return to Tennessee for his senior year.The strong-armed quarterback, who already holds most Tennessee passing records, said he played his junior season as if it were his last until it was time to leave, and he couldn't.
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By Phil Jackman | January 28, 1993
Super Talk:"Words don't win football games; people do." For emphasis, Hank Stram said it a couple of times and he backed it up with a story."After the very first Super Bowl game," said the former coach and now analyst for CBS Radio, "they came up and asked me what the difference was between us [Kansas City Chiefs] and the [victorious Green Bay] Packers. " 'Players like Fred 'The Hammer' Williamson shooting his mouth off,' I said."Three years later, the Chiefs and Stram were back at the big dance and this time they were a winner, clubbing Minnesota, 23-7."
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | January 4, 1993
The time was the early '70s, when the NFL, with unflinching cooperation from ABC, attempted to revamp the television-viewing habits of America in prime time.Nobody really expected "Monday Night Football" to soar through the ratings, laying to waste any programming the competing networks thrust in its path, much less be running strong two decades later.At the same time and with both football and television convinced they had tapped in on the second Comstock Lode, the folks over at CBS sensed an opening.
NEWS
July 5, 2005
NATIONAL EPA testing plan denounced While Congress pushes to restrict scientists' use of human test subjects for the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency is seeking to loosen its own rules for such experiments. EPA toxicologists, physicians and lawyers have denounced the agency's proposed ethical guidelines as dangerous. [Page 1a] Bush to court favor at G-8 meet President Bush will use the annual Group of 8 summit to burnish the U.S. image and pledge support for the top priorities of his allies.
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By PHIL JACKMAN | January 25, 1995
Reading Time: Two Minutes.After observing what has been going on in baseball and hockey the last several months, taking a spot behind "The check is in the mail" among the three biggest lies ever uttered is, "That's our final offer, take it or leave it!"* Nine underdogs have won the previous 28 Super Bowls with the biggest, of course, being the 18-point 'dog Jets against the Colts in III. The Vikings were a 12-point favorite over the Chiefs the very next year (1970) when, in the famous words of Kansas City coach Hank Stram, "This [23-7]
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