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August 2, 2006
Do you fault the Orioles for not making a trade Monday? Trading one of the top hitters in the game like Tejada for what was offered would have been ridiculous. Trading disgruntled Javy Lopez for a bag of baseballs and a player to be named later would have been brilliant. Jim Kirby Columbia No fault for not acquiring Oswalt, who would be gone by the 2008 season. Fault lies in the O's weak rookie drafts. Fault the O's farm system for the team's shallow assets to trade. Bill Piccirilli Lutherville No. 1 fault Jerry Hoffberger, Frank Cashen and Hank Peters for not leaving any notes behind on how to upgrade the team through trades.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette, who engineered one of the best turnarounds in baseball this season by taking the long suffering Orioles to the postseason for the first time in 15 years, was surprisingly shut out in the voting for this season's Sporting News Executive of the Year award , which goes to the game's top front office exec. Athletics general manager Billy Beane, whose Oakland team dramatically won the AL West on the final day of the regular season, received the award Wednesday night at the annual GM meetings in Indian Wells, Calif.
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SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | August 15, 1995
When Mickey Mantle was a high school senior in Commerce, Okla., in 1949, his class made a trip to St. Louis.While there, Mantle was to work out with the old St. Louis #F Browns. A man who worked in the Browns' farm department at that time -- Hank Peters -- still remembers the day."It rained," Peters was saying at the monthly J. Patrick's sports luncheon, "and Mantle didn't get to work out for us."Can you imagine what would have happened if it hadn't rained? If we'd seen that guy for five minutes we would have signed him."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 11, 2007
If you've been paying attention for the past 10 years or so, you've probably noticed that Baltimore is no longer the center of the baseball universe. Maybe it never was, but there was a time when the Orioles were one of the sport's cornerstone franchises, and during a big chunk of that heady period the general manager of the team was a nice man named Hank Peters. Peters, in fact, was the GM for the final 10 of the Orioles' amazing string of 18 straight winning seasons (1968-1985), somehow keeping the player development component of Oriole Way alive nearly a decade into the free-agent era. This little testimonial is not intended to strike some contrast between the good old days and the frustrating new ones, but to serve as pretext to an uplifting little story about the way a good organizational philosophy is handed down from generation to generation, though not necessarily in the same organization.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette, who engineered one of the best turnarounds in baseball this season by taking the long suffering Orioles to the postseason for the first time in 15 years, was surprisingly shut out in the voting for this season's Sporting News Executive of the Year award , which goes to the game's top front office exec. Athletics general manager Billy Beane, whose Oakland team dramatically won the AL West on the final day of the regular season, received the award Wednesday night at the annual GM meetings in Indian Wells, Calif.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 11, 2007
If you've been paying attention for the past 10 years or so, you've probably noticed that Baltimore is no longer the center of the baseball universe. Maybe it never was, but there was a time when the Orioles were one of the sport's cornerstone franchises, and during a big chunk of that heady period the general manager of the team was a nice man named Hank Peters. Peters, in fact, was the GM for the final 10 of the Orioles' amazing string of 18 straight winning seasons (1968-1985), somehow keeping the player development component of Oriole Way alive nearly a decade into the free-agent era. This little testimonial is not intended to strike some contrast between the good old days and the frustrating new ones, but to serve as pretext to an uplifting little story about the way a good organizational philosophy is handed down from generation to generation, though not necessarily in the same organization.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | August 11, 1992
Ernie Accorsi, who resigned recently as executive vice president of the Cleveland Browns, has the same feeling I have about the Indians team that played the Orioles here last weekend."
SPORTS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | September 4, 1995
Perhaps you can't imagine it, but once upon a time, Cal Ripken did not play in an Orioles game.It was during the Pleistocene Era, May 29, 1982, to be exact, the last game No. 8 sat one out.Remember?Well, never mind. Many of those who were involved in that game are still alive, and The Sun has tracked them around the globe to produce a you-are-there account of what it was like to be at THE LAST GAME CAL RIPKEN DIDN'T PLAY.It was the second game of a doubleheader against the Toronto Blue Jays at Memorial Stadium on a Saturday night.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | April 7, 1992
Sometimes it's better to go with instinct than computer printouts -- especially if you really know an athlete.That's what Orioles manager John Oates and his pitching coach, Dick Bosman, did yesterday in going with Rick Sutcliffe to pitch the season opener against Cleveland.A lot of managers and pitching coaches would have gone with Mike Mussina, who, at 23, looks as if he could be the ace of the O's staff.Sutcliffe, after all, has had shoulder trouble the last two years. His won-lost record with the Cubs in 1990 was 0-2. Last year he was 6-5. Hardly the kind of stats that would inspire confidence.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | July 22, 1993
The Orioles' success this year is no mystery to a retired Baltimore County resident.Maybe that's because the retiree is one of the most knowledgeable baseball men in the country -- Hank Peters, who was general manager of the Orioles from 1976 until the fall of '87.The last two times the Orioles played in the World Series, in 1979 and 1983, it was with players brought together by Peters. Both years Hank was voted Major League Executive of the Year.Peters retired 1 1/2 years ago as Cleveland Indians GM and, like so many other former Baltimore sports figures, decided to take up permanent residence here.
SPORTS
August 2, 2006
Do you fault the Orioles for not making a trade Monday? Trading one of the top hitters in the game like Tejada for what was offered would have been ridiculous. Trading disgruntled Javy Lopez for a bag of baseballs and a player to be named later would have been brilliant. Jim Kirby Columbia No fault for not acquiring Oswalt, who would be gone by the 2008 season. Fault lies in the O's weak rookie drafts. Fault the O's farm system for the team's shallow assets to trade. Bill Piccirilli Lutherville No. 1 fault Jerry Hoffberger, Frank Cashen and Hank Peters for not leaving any notes behind on how to upgrade the team through trades.
SPORTS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | September 4, 1995
Perhaps you can't imagine it, but once upon a time, Cal Ripken did not play in an Orioles game.It was during the Pleistocene Era, May 29, 1982, to be exact, the last game No. 8 sat one out.Remember?Well, never mind. Many of those who were involved in that game are still alive, and The Sun has tracked them around the globe to produce a you-are-there account of what it was like to be at THE LAST GAME CAL RIPKEN DIDN'T PLAY.It was the second game of a doubleheader against the Toronto Blue Jays at Memorial Stadium on a Saturday night.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | August 15, 1995
When Mickey Mantle was a high school senior in Commerce, Okla., in 1949, his class made a trip to St. Louis.While there, Mantle was to work out with the old St. Louis #F Browns. A man who worked in the Browns' farm department at that time -- Hank Peters -- still remembers the day."It rained," Peters was saying at the monthly J. Patrick's sports luncheon, "and Mantle didn't get to work out for us."Can you imagine what would have happened if it hadn't rained? If we'd seen that guy for five minutes we would have signed him."
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | July 22, 1993
The Orioles' success this year is no mystery to a retired Baltimore County resident.Maybe that's because the retiree is one of the most knowledgeable baseball men in the country -- Hank Peters, who was general manager of the Orioles from 1976 until the fall of '87.The last two times the Orioles played in the World Series, in 1979 and 1983, it was with players brought together by Peters. Both years Hank was voted Major League Executive of the Year.Peters retired 1 1/2 years ago as Cleveland Indians GM and, like so many other former Baltimore sports figures, decided to take up permanent residence here.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | August 11, 1992
Ernie Accorsi, who resigned recently as executive vice president of the Cleveland Browns, has the same feeling I have about the Indians team that played the Orioles here last weekend."
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | April 7, 1992
Sometimes it's better to go with instinct than computer printouts -- especially if you really know an athlete.That's what Orioles manager John Oates and his pitching coach, Dick Bosman, did yesterday in going with Rick Sutcliffe to pitch the season opener against Cleveland.A lot of managers and pitching coaches would have gone with Mike Mussina, who, at 23, looks as if he could be the ace of the O's staff.Sutcliffe, after all, has had shoulder trouble the last two years. His won-lost record with the Cubs in 1990 was 0-2. Last year he was 6-5. Hardly the kind of stats that would inspire confidence.
SPORTS
May 13, 1991
Albert Belle will stay in the Cleveland Indians' lineup while th American League decides how to punish him for hitting a fan with a baseball.Belle, who spent 10 weeks in an alcohol-rehabilitation program last summer, threw a ball at a heckler in the left-field stands Saturday, hitting him in the chest. The heckler, Jeff Pillar of Cleveland, had jokingly invited Belle to a keg party.Indians president Hank Peters said he would leave it up to manager John McNamara to decide whether Belle plays while the league investigates.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder | June 11, 1995
To avoid hiring a real commissioner to solve baseball's plethora of problems, baseball czar Bud Selig endorsed an Angelosian idea at Wednesday's owners meeting -- build new, publicly-funded ballparks in 11 major league cities. Will these new facilities cure baseball's ills? This week's selection is an unscientific analysis of the franchises with the most recenltly-built ballparks.Colorado Rockies -- UP -- The facade of Coors Field looks like Ebbets Field. The difference is the Rockies aren't playing like bums.
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