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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
Maryland, like the rest of the country, is aging. The state's 65-and-over population increased by more than 18 percent in the past 10 years to 707,642, according to the U.S. census. This group will only grow as baby boomers — those born between 1946 and 1965 — turn grayer. One of the most vocal advocates for older Americans is the AARP, which represents members who are 50 and older. While Social Security and Medicare have remained priorities for the organization, in Maryland it also focuses on more local issues such as lower electricity rates and reliability standards for utilities.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
Maryland, like the rest of the country, is aging. The state's 65-and-over population increased by more than 18 percent in the past 10 years to 707,642, according to the U.S. census. This group will only grow as baby boomers — those born between 1946 and 1965 — turn grayer. One of the most vocal advocates for older Americans is the AARP, which represents members who are 50 and older. While Social Security and Medicare have remained priorities for the organization, in Maryland it also focuses on more local issues such as lower electricity rates and reliability standards for utilities.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 27, 1999
Aviva Kempner grew up in Detroit, where every Yom Kippur her father, a Jewish immigrant, would tell her the same story about how the legendary Detroit Tiger Hank Greenberg refused to play baseball on the Jewish Day of Atonement."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 16, 2004
NEW YORK -- Marsh & McLennan Cos. Inc., the world's largest insurance broker, said yesterday that it will no longer seek fees from insurers after a lawsuit from New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer called them "payoffs," driving the company's shares down as much as 47 percent. The move is expected to cost Marsh $485 million in fees, or more than a quarter of its profit forecast for next year, according to Jonathan B. Balkind, an analyst with Fox-Pitt Kelton Inc. in New York. Spitzer's suit puts pressure on Jeffrey W. Greenberg, 53, to step down as Marsh's chief executive and will probably trigger similar concessions at other brokers, said Nicholas Xie, an analyst at PNC Advisors.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 14, 2000
One of this year's sleeper hits - and deservedly so - is "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," Aviva Kempner's engrossing documentary about the trailblazing player who, as America's first Jewish baseball star, helped redefine sports, heroism and American culture while playing for the Detroit Tigers in the 1930s and 1940s. Kempner's film has enjoyed successful runs at the Charles and Rotunda theaters; today it opens at the Loews Valley Centre in Owings Mills. This hasn't exactly been a boffo summer, especially for grown-up filmgoers - see "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg" for a pleasant respite.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | September 12, 1999
Hank Greenberg may have played for the Detroit Tigers, and Babe Ruth may have played for the New York Yankees, but both late big leaguers were on the same team in Baltimore recently. A new documentary about baseball's first Jewish superstar, "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," made its Baltimore premiere to benefit the Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum."Hank would be proud, since he revered Babe Ruth," said filmmaker Aviva Kempner.About 375 fans turned out at the Gordon Center for Performing Arts for the night's double-header: a reception and the screening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | August 26, 1999
Hank Greenberg was the first Jewish superstar in baseball when he played for the Detroit Tigers in the 1930s. In 1938 the Bronx-born Greenberg hit 58 home runs, just two shy of Babe Ruth's record. Washington, D.C., filmmaker Aviva Kempner, who grew up in Detroit and idolized Greenberg for his athleticism and his religious devotion (he received a Talmudic dispensation to play on Rosh Hashana but refused to play on Yom Kippur), has made "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," a delightful documentary that's been on the festival circuit since its debut last year.
SPORTS
September 11, 2002
Who's hot Ryan Klesko of the Padres has hit safely in 17 of 18 games, batting .382 (26-for-68). Who's not Brett Tomko of the Padres leads the majors in HRs allowed with 29. Who's hot Tony Womack of the Diamondbacks had an 11-game hitting streak going into last night. Line of the dayCliff Floyd, Red Sox RF AB R H RBI HR 5 3 4 2 0 On deck Alex Rodriguez of Texas has 10 multihomer games. Hank Greenberg and Sammy Sosa hold the mark (11). He said it "We just want to take care of ourselves at this point because the Dodgers and Giants are playing each other.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 21, 2000
I DON'T know about my Jews. Albert Einstein we gave to the world, and Sigmund Freud, too. From the great figures in literature and science and philosophy, we could fill entire ballparks. Nobel Prize winners, we got 'em by the score. But, scoring in major league baseball -- this, we can't seem to manage. Go figure. At the Charles Theatre this week, they are showing the heartwarming (and vexing) documentary, "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg." For those whose baseball history goes no deeper than Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, understand that Greenberg, more than 60 years ago, hit 58 home runs in a single season.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 16, 2004
NEW YORK -- Marsh & McLennan Cos. Inc., the world's largest insurance broker, said yesterday that it will no longer seek fees from insurers after a lawsuit from New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer called them "payoffs," driving the company's shares down as much as 47 percent. The move is expected to cost Marsh $485 million in fees, or more than a quarter of its profit forecast for next year, according to Jonathan B. Balkind, an analyst with Fox-Pitt Kelton Inc. in New York. Spitzer's suit puts pressure on Jeffrey W. Greenberg, 53, to step down as Marsh's chief executive and will probably trigger similar concessions at other brokers, said Nicholas Xie, an analyst at PNC Advisors.
SPORTS
September 11, 2002
Who's hot Ryan Klesko of the Padres has hit safely in 17 of 18 games, batting .382 (26-for-68). Who's not Brett Tomko of the Padres leads the majors in HRs allowed with 29. Who's hot Tony Womack of the Diamondbacks had an 11-game hitting streak going into last night. Line of the dayCliff Floyd, Red Sox RF AB R H RBI HR 5 3 4 2 0 On deck Alex Rodriguez of Texas has 10 multihomer games. Hank Greenberg and Sammy Sosa hold the mark (11). He said it "We just want to take care of ourselves at this point because the Dodgers and Giants are playing each other.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 14, 2000
One of this year's sleeper hits - and deservedly so - is "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," Aviva Kempner's engrossing documentary about the trailblazing player who, as America's first Jewish baseball star, helped redefine sports, heroism and American culture while playing for the Detroit Tigers in the 1930s and 1940s. Kempner's film has enjoyed successful runs at the Charles and Rotunda theaters; today it opens at the Loews Valley Centre in Owings Mills. This hasn't exactly been a boffo summer, especially for grown-up filmgoers - see "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg" for a pleasant respite.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 21, 2000
I DON'T know about my Jews. Albert Einstein we gave to the world, and Sigmund Freud, too. From the great figures in literature and science and philosophy, we could fill entire ballparks. Nobel Prize winners, we got 'em by the score. But, scoring in major league baseball -- this, we can't seem to manage. Go figure. At the Charles Theatre this week, they are showing the heartwarming (and vexing) documentary, "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg." For those whose baseball history goes no deeper than Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, understand that Greenberg, more than 60 years ago, hit 58 home runs in a single season.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
He was "Hammerin' Hank," a 6-foot, 4-inch New Yorker who ran with all the grace of a train wreck and, on a swinging strike, looked about as bad as a ballplayer could look. But when he connected -- which was often -- the ball jumped off his bat with the force of a howitzer, often not stopping until it had cleared the outfield fence. Hank Greenberg was one heckuva ballplayer, a two-time American League MVP who led the Detroit Tigers to two World Series titles in the 1930s and 1940s. For several years, he and the Yankees' Lou Gehrig were the game's dominant first basemen -- and not everyone agreed who was better.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | September 12, 1999
Hank Greenberg may have played for the Detroit Tigers, and Babe Ruth may have played for the New York Yankees, but both late big leaguers were on the same team in Baltimore recently. A new documentary about baseball's first Jewish superstar, "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," made its Baltimore premiere to benefit the Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum."Hank would be proud, since he revered Babe Ruth," said filmmaker Aviva Kempner.About 375 fans turned out at the Gordon Center for Performing Arts for the night's double-header: a reception and the screening.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 27, 1999
Aviva Kempner grew up in Detroit, where every Yom Kippur her father, a Jewish immigrant, would tell her the same story about how the legendary Detroit Tiger Hank Greenberg refused to play baseball on the Jewish Day of Atonement."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
He was "Hammerin' Hank," a 6-foot, 4-inch New Yorker who ran with all the grace of a train wreck and, on a swinging strike, looked about as bad as a ballplayer could look. But when he connected -- which was often -- the ball jumped off his bat with the force of a howitzer, often not stopping until it had cleared the outfield fence. Hank Greenberg was one heckuva ballplayer, a two-time American League MVP who led the Detroit Tigers to two World Series titles in the 1930s and 1940s. For several years, he and the Yankees' Lou Gehrig were the game's dominant first basemen -- and not everyone agreed who was better.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 22, 1999
All that could be discerned through the enthusiastic eyes of an 11-year-old child is Hank Greenberg fit the dimensions of a hero -- and, in ongoing respectful memory, still does. He played for the Detroit Tigers, was a giant of a man who hit home runs high into the sky and over faraway fences.That he was the only Jewish player in the major leagues was something the newspapers mentioned infrequently. Such a description carried absolutely no significance to a young boy impressed with Greenberg's stature, 6 feet 3 1/2, 218 pounds, and what he could do with a bat in his hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | August 26, 1999
Hank Greenberg was the first Jewish superstar in baseball when he played for the Detroit Tigers in the 1930s. In 1938 the Bronx-born Greenberg hit 58 home runs, just two shy of Babe Ruth's record. Washington, D.C., filmmaker Aviva Kempner, who grew up in Detroit and idolized Greenberg for his athleticism and his religious devotion (he received a Talmudic dispensation to play on Rosh Hashana but refused to play on Yom Kippur), has made "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," a delightful documentary that's been on the festival circuit since its debut last year.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 22, 1999
All that could be discerned through the enthusiastic eyes of an 11-year-old child is Hank Greenberg fit the dimensions of a hero -- and, in ongoing respectful memory, still does. He played for the Detroit Tigers, was a giant of a man who hit home runs high into the sky and over faraway fences.That he was the only Jewish player in the major leagues was something the newspapers mentioned infrequently. Such a description carried absolutely no significance to a young boy impressed with Greenberg's stature, 6 feet 3 1/2, 218 pounds, and what he could do with a bat in his hands.
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