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By Chris Kaltenbach | April 9, 2000
TV harks back to its first Golden Age at 9 p.m. today on WJZ, Channel 13, with a live, black-and-white broadcast -- an adaptation of "Fail Safe," the 1964 Cold War drama about a potential American nuclear strike on Moscow. Sidney Lumet directed the original film in which, thanks to a faulty transmission of orders, U.S. bombers are sent to the Soviet capital -- and make it past the point of no return before horrified military leaders can stop them. The original starred Dan O'Herlihy, Walter Matthau, and Fritz Weaver, with Henry Fonda as the president who must assure Soviet leaders it's all a terrible mistake.
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By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
She lost out to Kim Fields for a lead role on Living Single. She was a finalist to play Raven Symone's mom on Hangin' With Mr. Cooper, yet ended up being turned away. And after Baltimore resident Kimberly Brooks auditioned for a part on The Young and the Restless, she was told she wasn't pretty enough. Those are the more vivid memories of Hollywood setbacks for an actress who recently made good on a lifelong dream - a regular role on a television series - after years of guest appearances, recurring parts and rejections.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Think of "Rocky" on ice skates.That's what you get with "Mystery, Alaska," one of those hard-to-resist little guys-vs.-the world sports tales in which success isn't nearly as important as survival. Here, it's a ragtag bunch of Alaskan hockey players going up against the NHL's mighty New York Rangers.Created by prolific TV producer-director David E. Kelley ("Ally McBeal," "The Practice," "Chicago Hope," etc.), it's filled with his trademark touches: near-absurd situations, characters jumping from one inner crisis to the next, and a sometimes uneasy mix of humor and pathos.
FEATURES
By Anna Kaplan and Anna Kaplan,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
Is it possible to be a normal kid who just happens to be in show business? The answer is yes, at least for 13-year-old identical twins Curtis and Keith Garcia of Perry Hall. The eighth-graders recently came home from Los Angeles, where they spent six weeks shooting Eulogy, in which they star as the sons of Ray Romano of Everybody Loves Raymond fame. The film, which also stars Debra Winger, Rip Torn, Monica Potter and Hank Azaria (The Simpsons), is slated to hit theaters in October. The black comedy is about three generations of a dysfunctional family gathering for the funeral of a family patriarch.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 28, 1998
Though not up to the best of Disney, 20th Century Fox's "Anastasia" (7 p.m.-9 p.m., HBO) is a frequently delightful animated take on the legend of Anastasia, the youngest daughter of Russia's last czar, Nicholas, and his wife, Alexandra. Meg Ryan, at her sauciest, is the voice of the young czarina, who escapes the violent fate of the rest of her family and ends up in an orphanage, with no memory of who she is. Some of the animation is quite stunning, particularly a dream sequence staged in the czar's former palace.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 5, 1991
MAYBE THERE is more than a kernel of truth behind "Herman's Head." The general state of the world is probably a bit easier to comprehend if it turns out the human brain really is run by four hackneyed sitcom characters.That's the premise of this Fox show that premieres Sunday night at 9:30 on Channel 45 (WBFF). Herman Brooks himself, played by William Ragsdale, is a nice enough guy, an aspiring writer working in the fact-checking department of a magazine publisher. This half-hour will follow the trials and tribulations of his single-and-struggling-in-New-York life.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 8, 2002
Network television's midseason of new series starts tonight with NBC's Imagine That, a sitcom about the marriage and fantasy life of a comedy writer. Let's hope what follows is better than this - lots better. Imagine That, which stars Hank Azaria (Tuesdays With Morrie) as a Walter Mitty wannabe, is such a dull, derivative, predictable and lifeless sitcom that it made me wonder if the entire genre is exhausted. The really stupid thing about Imagine That is that it borrows shamelessly from a very bad sitcom.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
She lost out to Kim Fields for a lead role on Living Single. She was a finalist to play Raven Symone's mom on Hangin' With Mr. Cooper, yet ended up being turned away. And after Baltimore resident Kimberly Brooks auditioned for a part on The Young and the Restless, she was told she wasn't pretty enough. Those are the more vivid memories of Hollywood setbacks for an actress who recently made good on a lifelong dream - a regular role on a television series - after years of guest appearances, recurring parts and rejections.
FEATURES
By Anna Kaplan and Anna Kaplan,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
Is it possible to be a normal kid who just happens to be in show business? The answer is yes, at least for 13-year-old identical twins Curtis and Keith Garcia of Perry Hall. The eighth-graders recently came home from Los Angeles, where they spent six weeks shooting Eulogy, in which they star as the sons of Ray Romano of Everybody Loves Raymond fame. The film, which also stars Debra Winger, Rip Torn, Monica Potter and Hank Azaria (The Simpsons), is slated to hit theaters in October. The black comedy is about three generations of a dysfunctional family gathering for the funeral of a family patriarch.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 20, 2001
According to the Associated Press, "one real-life" junketeer emerged from America's Sweethearts, the new movie about a movie press junket, "sounding more hurt than angry" and asking, "Is that what they think of us?" The advance notices for this piquant, charming movie have been so tepid (or worse) that you have to wonder whether the movie press in general will also react against the picture's spot-on portrayal of journalists as easily manipulated parasites at a big-studio bash. John Cusack and Catherine Zeta-Jones play Eddie Thomas and Gwen Harrison, a hot screen couple whose off-screen marriage is on the rocks.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 8, 2002
Network television's midseason of new series starts tonight with NBC's Imagine That, a sitcom about the marriage and fantasy life of a comedy writer. Let's hope what follows is better than this - lots better. Imagine That, which stars Hank Azaria (Tuesdays With Morrie) as a Walter Mitty wannabe, is such a dull, derivative, predictable and lifeless sitcom that it made me wonder if the entire genre is exhausted. The really stupid thing about Imagine That is that it borrows shamelessly from a very bad sitcom.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 20, 2001
According to the Associated Press, "one real-life" junketeer emerged from America's Sweethearts, the new movie about a movie press junket, "sounding more hurt than angry" and asking, "Is that what they think of us?" The advance notices for this piquant, charming movie have been so tepid (or worse) that you have to wonder whether the movie press in general will also react against the picture's spot-on portrayal of journalists as easily manipulated parasites at a big-studio bash. John Cusack and Catherine Zeta-Jones play Eddie Thomas and Gwen Harrison, a hot screen couple whose off-screen marriage is on the rocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 9, 2000
TV harks back to its first Golden Age at 9 p.m. today on WJZ, Channel 13, with a live, black-and-white broadcast -- an adaptation of "Fail Safe," the 1964 Cold War drama about a potential American nuclear strike on Moscow. Sidney Lumet directed the original film in which, thanks to a faulty transmission of orders, U.S. bombers are sent to the Soviet capital -- and make it past the point of no return before horrified military leaders can stop them. The original starred Dan O'Herlihy, Walter Matthau, and Fritz Weaver, with Henry Fonda as the president who must assure Soviet leaders it's all a terrible mistake.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Think of "Rocky" on ice skates.That's what you get with "Mystery, Alaska," one of those hard-to-resist little guys-vs.-the world sports tales in which success isn't nearly as important as survival. Here, it's a ragtag bunch of Alaskan hockey players going up against the NHL's mighty New York Rangers.Created by prolific TV producer-director David E. Kelley ("Ally McBeal," "The Practice," "Chicago Hope," etc.), it's filled with his trademark touches: near-absurd situations, characters jumping from one inner crisis to the next, and a sometimes uneasy mix of humor and pathos.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 28, 1998
Though not up to the best of Disney, 20th Century Fox's "Anastasia" (7 p.m.-9 p.m., HBO) is a frequently delightful animated take on the legend of Anastasia, the youngest daughter of Russia's last czar, Nicholas, and his wife, Alexandra. Meg Ryan, at her sauciest, is the voice of the young czarina, who escapes the violent fate of the rest of her family and ends up in an orphanage, with no memory of who she is. Some of the animation is quite stunning, particularly a dream sequence staged in the czar's former palace.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 5, 1991
MAYBE THERE is more than a kernel of truth behind "Herman's Head." The general state of the world is probably a bit easier to comprehend if it turns out the human brain really is run by four hackneyed sitcom characters.That's the premise of this Fox show that premieres Sunday night at 9:30 on Channel 45 (WBFF). Herman Brooks himself, played by William Ragsdale, is a nice enough guy, an aspiring writer working in the fact-checking department of a magazine publisher. This half-hour will follow the trials and tribulations of his single-and-struggling-in-New-York life.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 14, 2008
"Chicago 10 - 10; History - 7," you may think to yourself as you leave Brett Morgen's skillful documentary depiction of what became known in 1969 as the Chicago Conspiracy Trial. That's not just because most people refer to the group on trial as the Chicago 7. (Morgen's number includes Bobby Seale, the Black Panther co-founder who was separated from the rest of the defendants, and their two lawyers, William Kunstler and Leonard Weinglass.) The movie conveys the drama of the moment but eschews context.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2009
Free SATURDAY: Enoch Pratt Free Library honors the Works Progress Administration and the Federal Writers' Project with two free screenings Saturday. Tim Robbins' look at politics and art in Depression-era New York City, "The Cradle Will Rock," stars John Cusack, Hank Azaria, Cherry Jones and Ruben Blades. It screens at the Central Library's Wheeler Auditorium, 400 Cathedral St., at 10:15 a.m. Also showing, at 2 p.m., is "Gold Diggers of 1933," a black-and-white film that served as an escapist musical during the Depression.
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