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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1995
Major-league baseball may be back, but not the way it was in 1974. That was the year Hank Aaron gripped the nation with his pursuit of Babe Ruth's lifetime home run record, ignoring racist threats -- as charted by a critically praised cable documentary on TBS tonight.* "Passover: Traditions of Freedom" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- An annually repeated production of Maryland's public television system, the documentary explores the traditions of the approaching Jewish holiday celebrating the exodus from Egypt.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Baltimore is a rather Catholic town; if you ever lived here you know that. I was born and raised an Irish Catholic in Baltimore; if you frequent this blog you may have known that. Baseball is the ultimate sport for bizarre connections to history. No sport does random statistics better than baseball. This morning's blog merges all of those concepts together rather seamlessly (or clumsily, that's your call). I must admit its ridiculousness made me laugh and shake my head a little bit. Baseball historian/statistician Bill Arnold passed this tidbit my way. And I had to share it with you. It combines Catholicism and baseball.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 12, 1995
Watching "Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream" is a lot like seeing Aaron hit one of his record 755 home runs.The two-hour documentary, which will premiere at 8:05 tonight on cable channel TBS, takes its time settling into its rhythm -- just the way Aaron made himself comfortable in the batter's box, without grandstanding or hot dog theatrics.Then, slowly but surely, it starts to hypnotize with easy, confident movements until the experience of watching feels like a dream. The sweetest moment of the dream is near the end, when one lightning-quick, incredibly smooth stroke on April 8, 1974, sends a ball climbing and climbing in a perfect white arc through the night.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | May 31, 2008
If you were not paying close attention, you probably missed much of the countdown to Manny Ramirez's imminent entry into the once-exclusive 500 Home Run Club. The Boston Red Sox arrived in town for a four-game series at Camden Yards with their big-swinging left fielder sitting at 499, which used to be considered the threshold of every power hitter's dream, but - sadly - 500 just ain't what it used to be. It was a pretty big deal when Willie Mays and Hank Aaron did it in the 1960s. It was still a big deal when Reggie Jackson did it in the 1980s.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | April 10, 1995
Washington. -- I have been judging college-bound students for scholarships lately, and more than a few have asked me, ''What caused the rebirth of racism in America?''I have been asked what happened to produce a climate where people want to deprive them of financial aid, where racism tears a jury apart in the O. J. Simpson trial, and where New York's Republican Sen. Alfonse D'Amato can act like a bigoted idiot by insulting Judge Lance Ito personally and Japanese Americans in general.I am telling these youngsters to be sure to watch the TBS movie Wednesday on the life of baseball hero Hank Aaron.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Mickey Mantle looked pretty good, better than he has looked in years. He has not had a drink in about nine months, and his face has lost that haggard look.Back in April, he had said: "I still can't remember much of the last 10 years, but from what I've been told, I really don't want those memories."Yesterday, he talked about some things he did remember.As he spoke, Hank Aaron looked on, getting ready for his turn. Aaron looks terrific. He may be a pound or two over his playing weight, but he carries it well.
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By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2000
Ray Lewis' Atlanta-based defense attorney is a well-regarded trial lawyer known for defending his clients' reputations through the media and winning over juries with a likable, low-key manner. Edward T.M. Garland, 58, is also a business partner of home run king Hank Aaron, who referred the Ravens to Garland, according to sources familiar with the case. Fellow attorneys say it was a good recommendation. "Ed has tremendous trial skills. He has a wonderful way of communicating with both judges and jurors," said Wilmer "Buddy" Parker III, a defense attorney who, when serving as a federal prosecutor, faced off against Garland.
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April 11, 2007
Good morning -- Barry Bonds -- Maybe Hank Aaron is just the first one alphabetically who doesn't want to see you break his record.
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August 9, 2007
With his 756th home run, Barry Bonds passed Hank Aaron for the most home runs hit in a career. Here's a look at how the two home run hitters compare statistically
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August 30, 1993
The Kansas City Royals' George Brett yesterday stole his 200th base, putting him into an exclusive club of players with 200 steals, 3,000 hits and 300 home runs:Player.. .. .. ..SB .. .. ..Hits .. .. .. ..HRHank Aaron .. ..240 .. .. .3,771 .. .. .. .755George Brett ...200 .. .. .3,123 .. .. .. .312Willie Mays .. .338 .. .. .3,283 .. .. .. .660
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By Roch Kubatko and Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun reporters | August 9, 2007
On any other night, Orioles shortstop Miguel Tejada wouldn't have interrupted his son's shower to make him watch television. It's usually better to let a 5-year-old get clean before bed, since it tends to be a chore. But Tejada had just seen Barry Bonds hit his record-setting 756th career home run, and he didn't want little Miguel to miss the replay. It's never too early in life, or late at night, to give a child a history lesson. Bonds passed Hank Aaron on the all-time list Tuesday night after Tejada returned home from Camden Yards.
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August 9, 2007
With his 756th home run, Barry Bonds passed Hank Aaron for the most home runs hit in a career. Here's a look at how the two home run hitters compare statistically
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2007
For the eclectic masses that make up America, defining the legacy of San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds is a challenge. Is he cheating pariah, baseball royalty, the quintessential spoiled athlete or a combination of all of the above? To most of the men who play the game at the highest level, however, Bonds is a co-worker and peer. Consequently, to most major leaguers, Bonds is an absolute marvel. "In my mind, he is the best player of the modern era," Arizona Diamondbacks outfielder and former Oriole Eric Byrnes said.
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July 29, 2007
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y.-- --Here, in the one place charged with immortalizing baseball's feats and achievements, the biggest record of them all doesn't seem to exist this weekend. Here, in the No Barry Zone, steroids are unimaginable and controversy nonexistent. Here, we choose to recognize only that which is good. In this Hall of Fame bubble, our ambassadors are named Cal Ripken Jr. and Tony Gwynn, and at today's induction ceremony, their names will be formally etched on the most hallowed list in sports.
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April 25, 2007
Who would you like to see hold the home run record? Since it is inevitable that Barry Bonds will break Hammerin' Hank's record and absolutley no one outside of the Bonds family is happy about it, would you like to see A-Rod, even though he is a Yankee, break the record? I hate seeing a Yankee holding a record, but I hate it even more to see a cheater with it. Bonds. Until I see proof that he cheated, not hearsay and stolen testimony from a convicted criminal, then I say he didn't cheat.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | April 15, 2007
It's difficult to ignore the strange confluence of events that have served as prologue to today's 60th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's first game with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Talkjock Don Imus was fired Thursday after making a demeaning and racially insensitive comment about the Rutgers University women's basketball team, which - coincidentally enough - was the same kind of thing Robinson had to endure from baseball fans and fellow major league players while he was making the history we celebrate today.
NEWS
September 10, 1996
On All-Time listsGAMES1. Pete Rose, 3,5622. Cal Yastrzemski, 3,3083. Hank Aaron, 3,2984. Ty Cobb, 3,0355. Stan Musial, 3,0266. Willie Mays, 2,9927. Dave Winfiled, 2,9738. Rusty Staub, 2,9529. Eddie Murray, 2,951AT-BATS1. Pete Rose, 14,0532. Hank Aaron, 12,3643. Carl Yastrzemski, 11,9884. Ty Cobb, 11,4345. Eddie Murray, 11,103HITS1. Pete Rose, 4,2562. Ty Cobb, 4,1893. Hank Aaron, 3,7714. Stan Musial, 3,6305. Tris Speaker, 3,5146. Carl Yastrzemski, 3,4197. Honus Wagner, 3,4158. Eddie Collins, 3,3129.
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August 10, 2002
755 Hank Aaron Hit 600th HR:April 27, 1971 Hit 500th HR:July 14, 1968 714 Babe Ruth Hit 600th HR: April 21, 1931 Hit 500th HR: Aug. 11, 1929 660 Willie Mays Hit 600th HR: Sept. 22, 1969 Hit 500th HR: Sept. 13, 1965 600 Barry Bonds Willie Mays Hit 600th HR: Aug. 9, 2002 Hit 500th HR: April 17, 2001
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April 11, 2007
Good morning -- Barry Bonds -- Maybe Hank Aaron is just the first one alphabetically who doesn't want to see you break his record.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | October 26, 2006
St. Louis -- The cold drizzle that washed out Game 4 of the World Series last night left me pondering the sports paradox of the ages. Why does baseball, the only major warm-weather team sport, allow its championship games to be played in terrible weather, when football, the only major all-weather sport, insists on perfect conditions for the Super Bowl? As the nuns used to say when I asked one of those unanswerable questions in Catholic grammar school, it's just one of the mysteries. The conditions last night were so abysmal that there would have been little question about the way to handle this situation during the regular season.
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