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Hanging

NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
A 28-year-old woman serving a 15-year sentence for second-degree murder apparently hanged herself yesterday in her cell at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup, state officials said.A correctional officer making routine rounds found the woman in her cell, hanging from an air vent by a bed sheet, said Maxine Eldridge, a spokeswoman for the state Division of Correction.The woman was taken to Laurel Regional Hospital, where she was pronounced dead at 2: 55 p.m., Eldridge said.
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NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | November 16, 1992
Two Anne Arundel County police officers and several motorists saved a 20-year-old man hanging from an Edgewater bridge from plunging 70 feet to his death in the South River's bone-chilling waters yesterday morning.The incident began at 10:15 a.m. when a caller told 911 operators that a man in a tan pickup truck was driving back and forth across the bridge. The caller told operators that he thought the man was thinking of suicide.When Officers Brent Weaver and Sonny Pentz arrived moments later, they spotted the man at the peak of the bridge in the northbound lanes.
NEWS
By Carol M. Swain | December 5, 2007
A spate of hanging nooses is being reported all over the country. This is creating an environment that has encouraged at least one black man to hang his own noose and place the blame on white co-workers. Donald Maynard, a Baltimore firefighter and paramedic, confessed to hanging a noose found last month in the fire station where he worked. Even though his report sparked a federal investigation and public outcry, Mr. Maynard will not face criminal charges for filing a false report. We will never be able to quantify the damage that Mr. Maynard's action did to race relations at his job and in the wider community.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Reporter | June 7, 2007
A detainee at Central Booking and Intake Center was found hanging from a sheet in his cell Tuesday night in an apparent suicide, officials said yesterday. It was the third suicide this year at the detention facility, according to Barbara Cooper, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Division of Pretrial Detention and Services. At 8:10 p.m., a correctional officer found Franklin L. Halterman, 33, of Northeast Baltimore hanging from the ceiling of his cell with a sheet tied around his neck, Cooper said.
NEWS
By David J. Boyer | October 14, 1992
A FEW days ago provided one of the few opportunities living in Baltimore allows us to indulge in one of life's little pleasures: hanging out laundry to dry. The rains had let up, Baltimore's famous humidity had dropped, and the clear, dry air provided ideal drying conditions.I've done the family laundry for many years; it's one of the few domestic skills I possess. Laundry is one job I've always been interested in, and many of my early memories are of watching my grandmother do the wash.She had an old wringer washing machine and double laundry tubs, and I used to love to watch her fill the water and throw it into gear, and then I would stand and follow the swirling, pulsing action in the soapy water.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 2000
ATLANTA - Attorney General Janet Reno and other top Justice Department officials assured the Rev. Jesse Jackson at a 90-minute meeting in Washington yesterday that the department was actively investigating the hanging of a black youth in his front yard in Kokomo, Miss., a month ago. An autopsy concluded that the death of the youth, Raynard Johnson, 17, was suicide. But his family and Jackson say they are convinced he was lynched because of his relationships with white girls. State, local and federal officials, under persistent pressure from Jackson, have been investigating the June 16 death despite the preliminary finding of suicide by a state medical examiner.
TOPIC
By Wallace Shugg | May 27, 2001
THE EARLIEST recorded Maryland execution was Oct. 22, 1773, when four convict servants were hanged in Frederick for slitting the throat of their master, Archibald Hoffman The first description of a Maryland execution came from John Duncan, a visitor to Baltimore in 1818, who witnessed the hanging of two mail robbers from outside the prison court yard along with numerous other spectators: "I had in my pocket a small perspective glass which I offered to...
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
When convicted murderer Billy Bailey steps onto the wooden gallows built just for him outside the Delaware Correctional Center tonight after midnight, it will be a grim end to a grim story.Bailey, 49, is one of 14 inmates awaiting death on Delaware -- a surprisingly large number for a tiny state with only three counties. He will be the first person in 50 years in Delaware to die by hanging, and he may be the last. This method of execution is considered so brutal that only four states use it and all four offer lethal injection as an alternative.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 24, 1995
We've got a holiday break planned that's guaranteed to be stress-free as well as cheap. It won't even involve much planning.That's because, for the first time in years, we're staying home over the school break. And I can't wait.After a grueling autumn that included a cross-country move, there's something to be said for a few days off with the kids: sleeping late, sitting around the fire playing Scrabble, watching videos and eating vast quantities of easy-to-prepare chili and spaghetti and anything else that doesn't require too much effort on anyone's part or too big a financial investment.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 18, 2000
Meg Ryan is the cute-as-a-button center of "Hanging Up," a movie that, like most of Ryan's movies, ends up being more about her hair than anything else. As Eve, the surrogate mother in a wackily dysfunctional show-biz family, Ryan's emotional state is eloquently expressed by the condition of her famously tousled hair. The more crazed and confused she gets, the more adorably messy that hair becomes. You find yourself wondering, not what her character is feeling but what products she uses to get her hair to do that.
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