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Hanging Baskets

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NEWS
By Deborah Toich and Deborah Toich,Staff writer | April 21, 1991
Short on space, but want to garden? Consider hanging baskets.Hanging baskets can be arranged for any space or personal preference. Ifyou buy your hanging basket, you can expect standard sizes, such as 6", 8" or 10" pots. You can expect to pay between $5 and $50 depending on the size and plants in the hanging basket.The first thing to consider in choosing a hanging basket is whereit will hang. What lighting conditions will the plant have?Plant expert Laurie Collins, from the new Earthtones Garden Shop at 40 Church Road in Arnold, said, "Outdoor hanging baskets will use native plants from all over the world.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
The organizers of Flowermart have an objective: fancy hats and refined behavior. "We are ensuring that the next generation of Baltimoreans knows what civility can be," said Carol Karcher Purcell, the two-day event's chairman. "We want our guests to have a wonderful day in the Mount Vernon parks." The free event is held at the base of the Washington Monument, at Mount Vernon Place and Charles Street, which will be closed to traffic Friday and Saturday. Purcell said that in addition to music and dance events - there's a 1950s dance contest Friday night - the mart is a showcase for vendors selling pots and market packs of annuals, as well as crafts.
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NEWS
April 22, 2007
The Harper's Choice Community Association will sponsor a sale of hanging baskets from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday at Kahler Hall, 5440 Old Tucker Row, in Harper's Choice Village Center. The baskets cost $13 each; two for $25. Information: 410-730-0770. Stress reduction program to be offered The Central library, 10375 Little Patuxent Parkway, is presenting "The New You," a three-part program with Marilyn Thorpe, life coach with NexPhase Transitions. A program on reducing stress is planned for 7 p.m. May 15, and a session on how not to procrastinate, for June 19. A session on managing time was held April 11. Registration is required.
FEATURES
August 11, 2007
Lantana Lantana camera Flower color of this butterfly and hummingbird magnet grows in a fascinating arrangement. Perched on tall stems, the round flower clusters have distinct circles of color - a kaleidoscope of yellow, orange, white, red and purple shades - mixed within the same cluster. Not hardy in Maryland, the shrublike lantana performs well as an annual. Tiny purchased transplants quickly grow to 2-foot-tall specimens. Purple lantanas are more vinelike and are a good choice for hanging baskets.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | March 26, 1995
Each spring, my wife and I close out our bank account, head for the local garden center and buy a few flowering hanging baskets. To heck with the cost; we're smitten with these lush baskets overflowing with decorative plants -- trailing types of this and cascading kinds of that.There are baskets filled with drooping varieties of petunia, portulaca and pansy; torenia, thyme and (cherry) tomatoes.Most striking, perhaps, are the hanging baskets filled with verdant ivy geraniums, fuchsias and impatiens, all bearing brilliant blossoms and glossy foliage that spill out over the top and literally cover the sides of the containers.
FEATURES
August 11, 2007
Lantana Lantana camera Flower color of this butterfly and hummingbird magnet grows in a fascinating arrangement. Perched on tall stems, the round flower clusters have distinct circles of color - a kaleidoscope of yellow, orange, white, red and purple shades - mixed within the same cluster. Not hardy in Maryland, the shrublike lantana performs well as an annual. Tiny purchased transplants quickly grow to 2-foot-tall specimens. Purple lantanas are more vinelike and are a good choice for hanging baskets.
FEATURES
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | July 6, 1997
What could be more appealing than a hanging basket massed with flowering plants that will go on giving pleasure the entire summer?Creating a hanging basket is not difficult, even for a novice. It's also reasonably inexpensive.Gardening in containers of all kinds has become increasingly popular as new generations of gardeners discover the joys of a movable floral feast. A patio, a deck, or a small backyard can be transformed by a combination of containers and hanging baskets.Bare patch in one shady corner?
NEWS
April 24, 1992
This year's cool weather has produced a glorious spring. After years of premature blossoms, the Japanese cherry trees around Druid Hill Lake came out on time. Dogwoods and azaleas are now producing their colorful riot and a tulip watch is on for the peak of Sherwood Gardens.Spring is a grand season in Maryland. Much of its glory in Baltimore's public places is due to the efforts of countless volunteers. For decades, their fund-raising and labor of love have made Guilford's Sherwood Gardens what it is. (Come to think of it, even those cherry trees around Druid Hill Lake were donated by public-minded citizens.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | April 29, 2007
The Union Mills Homestead will be turned into a colorful garden next weekend as the 210-year-old historic Shriver farm is filled with blooming spring flowers for the 38th annual Flower and Plant Market. A variety of plants, including hanging baskets, climbing vines and even small shrubs, can be found by gardeners for their homes and yards. "What really makes it unique is our selection of quality plants and a huge selection of hanging baskets that people can take home and enjoy," said James Shriver III, one of four committee members who heads Homestead's longest-running event.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
The organizers of Flowermart have an objective: fancy hats and refined behavior. "We are ensuring that the next generation of Baltimoreans knows what civility can be," said Carol Karcher Purcell, the two-day event's chairman. "We want our guests to have a wonderful day in the Mount Vernon parks." The free event is held at the base of the Washington Monument, at Mount Vernon Place and Charles Street, which will be closed to traffic Friday and Saturday. Purcell said that in addition to music and dance events - there's a 1950s dance contest Friday night - the mart is a showcase for vendors selling pots and market packs of annuals, as well as crafts.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | July 15, 2007
Sometime this summer, chances are you're going to go on vacation. But what about your plants? How will they live without you? Their major enemies will be heat and moisture loss. But with some planning, you can be pretty confident that you will not come back to a garden or houseplant graveyard. Choose survivors --If you know you are going to be away for a week or more this summer, don't plant thirsty things such as impatiens. Smart owners of weekend homes who often leave their plants for weeks at a time rely on drought-tolerant species such as black-eyed Susans (rudbeckia)
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | April 29, 2007
The Union Mills Homestead will be turned into a colorful garden next weekend as the 210-year-old historic Shriver farm is filled with blooming spring flowers for the 38th annual Flower and Plant Market. A variety of plants, including hanging baskets, climbing vines and even small shrubs, can be found by gardeners for their homes and yards. "What really makes it unique is our selection of quality plants and a huge selection of hanging baskets that people can take home and enjoy," said James Shriver III, one of four committee members who heads Homestead's longest-running event.
NEWS
April 22, 2007
The Harper's Choice Community Association will sponsor a sale of hanging baskets from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday at Kahler Hall, 5440 Old Tucker Row, in Harper's Choice Village Center. The baskets cost $13 each; two for $25. Information: 410-730-0770. Stress reduction program to be offered The Central library, 10375 Little Patuxent Parkway, is presenting "The New You," a three-part program with Marilyn Thorpe, life coach with NexPhase Transitions. A program on reducing stress is planned for 7 p.m. May 15, and a session on how not to procrastinate, for June 19. A session on managing time was held April 11. Registration is required.
FEATURES
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | July 6, 1997
What could be more appealing than a hanging basket massed with flowering plants that will go on giving pleasure the entire summer?Creating a hanging basket is not difficult, even for a novice. It's also reasonably inexpensive.Gardening in containers of all kinds has become increasingly popular as new generations of gardeners discover the joys of a movable floral feast. A patio, a deck, or a small backyard can be transformed by a combination of containers and hanging baskets.Bare patch in one shady corner?
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | March 26, 1995
Each spring, my wife and I close out our bank account, head for the local garden center and buy a few flowering hanging baskets. To heck with the cost; we're smitten with these lush baskets overflowing with decorative plants -- trailing types of this and cascading kinds of that.There are baskets filled with drooping varieties of petunia, portulaca and pansy; torenia, thyme and (cherry) tomatoes.Most striking, perhaps, are the hanging baskets filled with verdant ivy geraniums, fuchsias and impatiens, all bearing brilliant blossoms and glossy foliage that spill out over the top and literally cover the sides of the containers.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1994
Tucked at the rear of the Howard County School of Technology is a place that would make any gardener turn green with envy.Down a long corridor, through a door and past a classroom are four greenhouses filled with several hundred varieties of house plants and garden flowers, from delicate blue ageratum to budding red begonias to leafy, colorful fuchsias.Hundreds of people will flock to the Ellicott City school on Route 108 Saturday for the school's spring plant sale. They'll come from Delaware, Pennsylvania and Virginia.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1994
Tucked at the rear of the Howard County School of Technology is a place that would make any gardener turn green with envy.Down a long corridor, through a door and past a classroom are four greenhouses filled with several hundred varieties of house plants and garden flowers, from delicate blue ageratum to budding red begonias to leafy, colorful fuchsias.Hundreds of people will flock to the Ellicott City school on Route 108 Saturday for the school's spring plant sale. They'll come from Delaware, Pennsylvania and Virginia.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | July 15, 2007
Sometime this summer, chances are you're going to go on vacation. But what about your plants? How will they live without you? Their major enemies will be heat and moisture loss. But with some planning, you can be pretty confident that you will not come back to a garden or houseplant graveyard. Choose survivors --If you know you are going to be away for a week or more this summer, don't plant thirsty things such as impatiens. Smart owners of weekend homes who often leave their plants for weeks at a time rely on drought-tolerant species such as black-eyed Susans (rudbeckia)
NEWS
By BARBARA KAPLAN BASS | August 23, 1992
Once more I had jumped the vernal gun: Annuals already lounging in the window boxes, hanging baskets dangling from shiny new hooks on the front porch, scrawny tomato plants cringing under towering tomato cages, symbols of my hope for another spring.I'm always in a rush to put winter behind me. In the yard, new sprouts, like pieces of cut glass, have jumped along with me, nudging their way into the open air, freeing themselves of the cold ground, welcoming another new season.And then, the death knell on the evening news: frost warnings tonight for the northern suburbs.
NEWS
April 24, 1992
This year's cool weather has produced a glorious spring. After years of premature blossoms, the Japanese cherry trees around Druid Hill Lake came out on time. Dogwoods and azaleas are now producing their colorful riot and a tulip watch is on for the peak of Sherwood Gardens.Spring is a grand season in Maryland. Much of its glory in Baltimore's public places is due to the efforts of countless volunteers. For decades, their fund-raising and labor of love have made Guilford's Sherwood Gardens what it is. (Come to think of it, even those cherry trees around Druid Hill Lake were donated by public-minded citizens.
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