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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Seeking to find a replacement for Rob Doerr, last year's Defenseman of the Year, the Bayhawks made two trades yesterday, acquiring All-Star defenseman Jamie Hanford and the 2003 playing rights to Dan Radebaugh. The Bayhawks sent the playing rights to Doerr, who left the team last month after being accepted into the New York Police Academy, and first-round draft pick Tom Kessler to the Bridgeport Barrage for Hanford, a former All-American at Loyola College. Hanford will be in uniform tonight when the Bayhawks are host to the defending champion Long Island Lizards at 7:30 at Ravens Stadium.
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By McClatchy-Tribune | November 25, 2006
RICHLAND, Wash. -- The Department of Energy is asking a federal judge to dismiss some claims in a lawsuit brought by the Yakama Nation for natural resource damage at the Hanford, Wash., nuclear reservation. The Yakama Nation, joined by Oregon, Washington, the Nez Perce and the Umatillas, is alleging that the federal government has failed to adequately assess harm to natural resources caused by nuclear contamination at Hanford from the past production of plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program.
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SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY and JAMISON HENSLEY,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 3, 1998
Loyola's Jamie Hanford is the best dual weapon in lacrosse, but don't attempt to explain that to him.Name another team who asks a player to take on the physically grinding task of faceoffs and then match up against the opposition's top attackman. Yet Hanford excels at both and single-handedly changes the facets of games, giving the Greyhounds numerous scoring opportunities by dominating the draws while silencing the other team's attack.Although Hanford won't admit it, many perceive him as one of the top workhorses in college lacrosse history.
NEWS
August 30, 2006
On August 25, 2006, THOMAS HANFORD GRIEGER, beloved husband of Lois G. Grieger, devoted father of Gay Hanford Grieger-Lods, Alan Kirbie Grieger and Thomas Hanford Grieger Jr., devoted grandfather of Kimberly Grieger and Thomas Hanford Grieger, III. He is also survived by 1 great grandchild Thomas Hanford Grieger, IV, 1 sister, Lois McLevy and nieces and nephews residing in Connecticut. Friends may call at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc., 1050 York Rd (Beltway Exit 26 A) on Thursday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M.
NEWS
August 30, 2006
On August 25, 2006, THOMAS HANFORD GRIEGER, beloved husband of Lois G. Grieger, devoted father of Gay Hanford Grieger-Lods, Alan Kirbie Grieger and Thomas Hanford Grieger Jr., devoted grandfather of Kimberly Grieger and Thomas Hanford Grieger, III. He is also survived by 1 great grandchild Thomas Hanford Grieger, IV, 1 sister, Lois McLevy and nieces and nephews residing in Connecticut. Friends may call at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc., 1050 York Rd (Beltway Exit 26 A) on Thursday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1995
Loyola's Jamie Hanford has a huge appetite, but nothing quite measures up to the bite he took out of the Johns Hopkins offense two weeks ago.The freshman defenseman from Darien, Conn., held Hopkins attackman Terry Riordan to one goal in a 12-11 Hopkins victory. That's Riordan, as in All-American. Riordan, as in the Blue-Jays' all-time leading goal scorer with 44 this season."The coaches thought I did a good job the first time against him, and I'm anxious to play him a second," said Hanford.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 25, 2006
RICHLAND, Wash. -- The Department of Energy is asking a federal judge to dismiss some claims in a lawsuit brought by the Yakama Nation for natural resource damage at the Hanford, Wash., nuclear reservation. The Yakama Nation, joined by Oregon, Washington, the Nez Perce and the Umatillas, is alleging that the federal government has failed to adequately assess harm to natural resources caused by nuclear contamination at Hanford from the past production of plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 18, 1999
I'LL TELL YOU WHEN I start to worry. I start to worry when "officials" tell me not to worry. This is why I am concerned about the following Associated Press report, which was sent to me by a number of alert readers: "RICHLAND, WASH. -- Radioactive ants, flies and gnats have been found at the Hanford nuclear complex, bringing to mind those Cold-War-era 'B' horror movies in which giant mutant insects are the awful price paid for mankind's entry into the Atomic Age. "Officials at the nation's most contaminated nuclear site insist there is no danger of Hanford becoming the setting for a '90s version of "Them!"
NEWS
By Seattle Times | September 30, 1990
A storage tank at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state has leaked more than a million gallons of cooling water contaminated by radioactive waste, an amount far surpassing any other admitted leak of potentially deadly materials at the site.State officials expressed outrage at learning only last week of the enormous leak despite repeated, extensive discussions with Hanford officials about 149 single-shell tanks considered to be the site's most serious environmental problem.Public documents of the federal Department of Energy and Westinghouse Hanford Co., the main contractor at the arid, sagebrush-covered site near Richland, Wash.
NEWS
December 7, 1993
CAROLINE GROSS, 53, New Hampshire's House majority leader, died Sunday of cancer in Concord. The Republican joined the legislature in 1983 and was serving her sixth term. She was named 1993 Legislator of the Year by the National Republican Legislators Association. She was a delegate to the New Hampshire Republican Convention from 1968 to 1978 and worked as administrative assistant to former Gov. Walter Peterson in 1969 and 1970.Franklin T. Matthias, 85, who directed construction of the federal government's Hanford nuclear weapons research and production reservation during World War II, died of cancer Friday in Walnut Creek, Calif.
NEWS
August 29, 2006
Thomas Hanford Grieger, a retired Martin Marietta engineer and bicycling enthusiast, died of Alzheimer's disease Friday at ManorCare Ruxton. The longtime Baldwin resident was 91. Mr. Grieger was born and raised in Fairfield, Conn., and served in the Connecticut National Guard. He moved to Baltimore in the late 1930s, when he went to work for Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River. During the early 1940s, Mr. Grieger was lead engineer on a project that studied the effects of adverse winter weather on airplane wings at the top of 6,288-foot Mount Washington in New Hampshire.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Seeking to find a replacement for Rob Doerr, last year's Defenseman of the Year, the Bayhawks made two trades yesterday, acquiring All-Star defenseman Jamie Hanford and the 2003 playing rights to Dan Radebaugh. The Bayhawks sent the playing rights to Doerr, who left the team last month after being accepted into the New York Police Academy, and first-round draft pick Tom Kessler to the Bridgeport Barrage for Hanford, a former All-American at Loyola College. Hanford will be in uniform tonight when the Bayhawks are host to the defending champion Long Island Lizards at 7:30 at Ravens Stadium.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | May 23, 1999
BEFORE I GET TO today's topic, which is celebrity-attacking birds, I want to issue a formal apology to the "Tri Cities." The Tri Cities are Pasco, Richland and Kennewick, Wash., which call themselves the Tri Cities in proud recognition of the fact that there are three of them. I had not heard of these cities until recently, when I wrote a column about the Hanford contaminated nuclear dump site, which is located near the Tri Cities. My column was about the fact that radioactive ants, flies and gnats had been discovered at Hanford; I expressed concern that they might mutate and become gigantic and attack Los Angeles and suck all the blood out of actress Fran Drescher.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 18, 1999
I'LL TELL YOU WHEN I start to worry. I start to worry when "officials" tell me not to worry. This is why I am concerned about the following Associated Press report, which was sent to me by a number of alert readers: "RICHLAND, WASH. -- Radioactive ants, flies and gnats have been found at the Hanford nuclear complex, bringing to mind those Cold-War-era 'B' horror movies in which giant mutant insects are the awful price paid for mankind's entry into the Atomic Age. "Officials at the nation's most contaminated nuclear site insist there is no danger of Hanford becoming the setting for a '90s version of "Them!"
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 22, 1998
No teams feed off controlling faceoffs more than Loyola and Maryland. So when they meet at high noon tomorrow, the team quicker to the draw will most likely survive to advance to the national-championship game.In the Greyhounds' school-record, 12-game winning streak, Jamie Hanford has won 169 of 242 faceoffs (.698). After a lackluster start against Georgetown last week, he took six of seven draws in the fourth quarter."Obviously, we're going to see something we haven't seen in a while in Booger," Maryland coach Dick Edell said, referring to Hanford by his nickname.
SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY and JAMISON HENSLEY,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 3, 1998
Loyola's Jamie Hanford is the best dual weapon in lacrosse, but don't attempt to explain that to him.Name another team who asks a player to take on the physically grinding task of faceoffs and then match up against the opposition's top attackman. Yet Hanford excels at both and single-handedly changes the facets of games, giving the Greyhounds numerous scoring opportunities by dominating the draws while silencing the other team's attack.Although Hanford won't admit it, many perceive him as one of the top workhorses in college lacrosse history.
SPORTS
By Scott Pianowski and Scott Pianowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1996
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Go ahead, watch every lacrosse game you can for the next decade. Here's betting you won't find a finish more bizarre than this one.Eighth-ranked Loyola and No. 4 Brown got a refresher course in the rules of lacrosse yesterday when they met at Brown Stadium. It's not clear who won the argument, but the Bears won the game, 13-12, before a small crowd that braved the cold and wind.Chris Georgalas had three goals, and Brian Duffy had a goal and three assists for the Greyhounds (2-2)
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Jamison Hensley | June 12, 1994
After two scoreless, four-minute overtime periods, John Blatchley's goal 36 seconds into sudden death lifted the club all-stars to an 11-10 win over Team USA.The game was the first of 11 for Team USA before the World Games, July 20-30 in Manchester, England. The club all-stars are the Team USA alternates, plus Gary Gait of Canada, who scored two goals last night.Gait and his twin brother, Paul, regarded as the world's best offensive players, will play for Canada against Team USA in the World Games.
SPORTS
By Scott Pianowski and Scott Pianowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1996
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Go ahead, watch every lacrosse game you can for the next decade. Here's betting you won't find a finish more bizarre than this one.Eighth-ranked Loyola and No. 4 Brown got a refresher course in the rules of lacrosse yesterday when they met at Brown Stadium. It's not clear who won the argument, but the Bears won the game, 13-12, before a small crowd that braved the cold and wind.Chris Georgalas had three goals, and Brian Duffy had a goal and three assists for the Greyhounds (2-2)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 11, 1995
AVIANO AIR BASE, Italy -- As he lay in the bushes near where his parachute landed, his face in the dirt and his ears covered with camouflage gloves, Capt. Scott F. O'Grady thought that a ** few feet away there were people looking to kill him."It wasn't that they were just walking around me," the 29-year-old pilot said yesterday. "It was that they were shooting their rifles."He had every reason to believe he was the intended target.At his first news conference since his dramatic rescue two days ago, Captain O'Grady, whose F-16 jet fighter was downed by a Serbian missile while on NATO patrol over Bosnia, told how he managed to survive for six days in a Bosnian forest, hiding by day, never sleeping for more than half an hour at a time, moving around only at night, and even then never ranging farther than a mile and a half.
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