Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHand Sanitizer
IN THE NEWS

Hand Sanitizer

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | September 21, 2012
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler has reached a settlement with California-based CleanWell Company and OhSo Clean Inc, the makers of a hand sanitizer that claimed it was "proven to kill 99.99 percent of germs that can make you sick. " Gansler's investigation revealed no actual proof that those statements were true. CleanWell must pay $100,000 in penalties and costs, and will no longer be allowed to assert that its hand sanitizer can prevent disease or infection. “Companies that make unsubstantiated claims about their products deceive consumers into spending their hard-earned money on something that may not live up to its billing,” Gansler said in a statement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | September 21, 2012
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler has reached a settlement with California-based CleanWell Company and OhSo Clean Inc, the makers of a hand sanitizer that claimed it was "proven to kill 99.99 percent of germs that can make you sick. " Gansler's investigation revealed no actual proof that those statements were true. CleanWell must pay $100,000 in penalties and costs, and will no longer be allowed to assert that its hand sanitizer can prevent disease or infection. “Companies that make unsubstantiated claims about their products deceive consumers into spending their hard-earned money on something that may not live up to its billing,” Gansler said in a statement.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
When Sandy Summers picks up her children - ages 6 and 10 - at elementary school, they're greeted with squirts of hand sanitizer. "When they get in the car, I put a glob on their hands," said the nurse, who lives in Homeland. "If they're going to eat a snack in the car, I make them use some. ... If I go to the grocery store, when I get in the car, the first thing I do is use the sanitizer. If I forget to use it before I touch the steering wheel, I put a whole bunch on my hands and just wipe it all over the steering wheel.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
In the 1880s Louis Pasteur studied germs and encouraged doctors to sanitize their hands and equipment before surgery. Prior to this, few practiced the procedure. A lack of understanding of germs and bacteria led to the spread of disease that killed more Civil War soldiers than enemy bullets during the entire war. Over 100,000 die in the U.S. yearly because doctors and nurses do not wash their hands. What have we learned? If we washed our hands, we might not end up as a statistic.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Acme Paper & Supply Co. has a name more befitting its past than its present. When the company started in 1946, it specialized in paper products such as drinking cups. Today, Acme is a much different company — so much so that the tagline "more than paper" has been appended to its name. Plastics are now the predominant part of the business. The company also has helped the U.S. House of Representatives switch to more environmentally friendly products. If you've ever used hand sanitizer at a hospital or restaurant, it was likely supplied by Acme.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
In the 1880s Louis Pasteur studied germs and encouraged doctors to sanitize their hands and equipment before surgery. Prior to this, few practiced the procedure. A lack of understanding of germs and bacteria led to the spread of disease that killed more Civil War soldiers than enemy bullets during the entire war. Over 100,000 die in the U.S. yearly because doctors and nurses do not wash their hands. What have we learned? If we washed our hands, we might not end up as a statistic.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
They're slathering on hand sanitizer, wearing surgical masks to class, and at least one student erected a curtain in the middle of her dorm room hoping to create a hygienic barrier from her roommate. As swine flu takes hold at the College Park campus of the University of Maryland, some of the most cautious students are even forgoing a sacred Thursday night ritual: $2 pitchers at the Thirsty Turtle on U.S. 1. To these germaphobes, no measure is too great to protect against the virus they've dubbed "the swine."
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 13, 2012
It's going to get cold again this weekend and the perfect time to winterize your skin. Frigid temperatures, dry hair, high home heat and winter sun can wreak havoc on your skin. If you don't fend off the damage you'll be looking at botox by the time your 30. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) suggest that at least 81 million Americans experience dry, itchy or scaly skin during the winter months. Johns Hopkins professor Dr. Rebecca A. Kazin has tips to keeping skin healthy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Before the Johns Hopkins University president gives 1,300 graduating students their congratulatory handshake on Thursday, volunteers will give them a cautionary dollop of hand sanitizer. "What can I say? We're a health-conscious university," said Dennis O'Shea, spokesman for Hopkins. Since the influenza epidemic of 2009, gel disinfectant has been spreading around schools like strep on throats. Yet there's little scientific evidence that harmful bacteria are passed through a casual squeeze of the hands during commencement.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 21, 2004
I have become obsessive about washing my hands. All the news reports about the shortage of flu vaccine stress the importance of washing hands. Now they are red and rough and getting worse by the day. My work requires that I shake a lot of hands, and I can't always get to a bathroom to wash up. How effective are waterless hand sanitizers? This might come as a surprise, but alcohol-based hand sanitizers are less irritating than liquid soap. They are as effective as soap and water and do not require wetting hands or drying them off. They work best if you put a dime-sized dollop in your palm and rub vigorously until the alcohol has dried and disinfected your skin.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 13, 2012
It's going to get cold again this weekend and the perfect time to winterize your skin. Frigid temperatures, dry hair, high home heat and winter sun can wreak havoc on your skin. If you don't fend off the damage you'll be looking at botox by the time your 30. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) suggest that at least 81 million Americans experience dry, itchy or scaly skin during the winter months. Johns Hopkins professor Dr. Rebecca A. Kazin has tips to keeping skin healthy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Before the Johns Hopkins University president gives 1,300 graduating students their congratulatory handshake on Thursday, volunteers will give them a cautionary dollop of hand sanitizer. "What can I say? We're a health-conscious university," said Dennis O'Shea, spokesman for Hopkins. Since the influenza epidemic of 2009, gel disinfectant has been spreading around schools like strep on throats. Yet there's little scientific evidence that harmful bacteria are passed through a casual squeeze of the hands during commencement.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Acme Paper & Supply Co. has a name more befitting its past than its present. When the company started in 1946, it specialized in paper products such as drinking cups. Today, Acme is a much different company — so much so that the tagline "more than paper" has been appended to its name. Plastics are now the predominant part of the business. The company also has helped the U.S. House of Representatives switch to more environmentally friendly products. If you've ever used hand sanitizer at a hospital or restaurant, it was likely supplied by Acme.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
When Sandy Summers picks up her children - ages 6 and 10 - at elementary school, they're greeted with squirts of hand sanitizer. "When they get in the car, I put a glob on their hands," said the nurse, who lives in Homeland. "If they're going to eat a snack in the car, I make them use some. ... If I go to the grocery store, when I get in the car, the first thing I do is use the sanitizer. If I forget to use it before I touch the steering wheel, I put a whole bunch on my hands and just wipe it all over the steering wheel.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
They're slathering on hand sanitizer, wearing surgical masks to class, and at least one student erected a curtain in the middle of her dorm room hoping to create a hygienic barrier from her roommate. As swine flu takes hold at the College Park campus of the University of Maryland, some of the most cautious students are even forgoing a sacred Thursday night ritual: $2 pitchers at the Thirsty Turtle on U.S. 1. To these germaphobes, no measure is too great to protect against the virus they've dubbed "the swine."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Children poured out of the doors of Folger McKinsey Elementary School, eagerly presenting their mothers paintings and paper birds that they had made. But some of the children were showing off another item they had collected during the day - bottles of hand sanitizer. Dismissal time at the Severna Park elementary school, where one pupil was identified as likely having swine flu, was subdued Thursday afternoon because nearly half the students did not come to school. But parents who were picking up their children said that they were not very worried, even as the White House announced that an Anne Arundel County man who recently traveled to Mexico in advance of President Barack Obama also probably has swine flu, as do three members of his family.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Children poured out of the doors of Folger McKinsey Elementary School, eagerly presenting their mothers paintings and paper birds that they had made. But some of the children were showing off another item they had collected during the day - bottles of hand sanitizer. Dismissal time at the Severna Park elementary school, where one pupil was identified as likely having swine flu, was subdued Thursday afternoon because nearly half the students did not come to school. But parents who were picking up their children said that they were not very worried, even as the White House announced that an Anne Arundel County man who recently traveled to Mexico in advance of President Barack Obama also probably has swine flu, as do three members of his family.
HEALTH
November 28, 2009
Officials at Howard County General Hospital this week lifted a ban that kept all nonpatient children younger than 16 from visiting. Issued in late October, the ban was designed to curb the spread of the H1N1 virus, commonly known as swine flu. The measure also restricted visitors to immediate family members and allowed intensive care unit patients only two visitors at a time. Visitors are still encouraged to use hand sanitizer or soap and water before and after patient contact. People with colds or fever should not visit the hospital.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 21, 2004
I have become obsessive about washing my hands. All the news reports about the shortage of flu vaccine stress the importance of washing hands. Now they are red and rough and getting worse by the day. My work requires that I shake a lot of hands, and I can't always get to a bathroom to wash up. How effective are waterless hand sanitizers? This might come as a surprise, but alcohol-based hand sanitizers are less irritating than liquid soap. They are as effective as soap and water and do not require wetting hands or drying them off. They work best if you put a dime-sized dollop in your palm and rub vigorously until the alcohol has dried and disinfected your skin.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.