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By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
It snowed Saturday in Hancock County, Illinois, where many farms are still under water from the summer's flood and where residents are eagerly awaiting flood relief from Hampstead and Carroll County."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 14, 2008
Beautine DeCosta-Lee, a retired educator and civil rights activist who participated in the Montgomery bus boycott led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., died of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Kirby Pines retirement community in Memphis, Tenn. The former longtime Northwest Baltimore resident was 95. Beautine Hubert, the granddaughter of slaves, was born in Hancock County, Ga., and was raised near Savannah. "Her parents, John Wesley and Lillie Jones Hubert, were educators," said her daughter, Dr. Miriam DeCosta-Willis, an author who lives in Memphis.
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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | September 22, 1993
Carroll government workers are organizing a walk-a-thon and starting a drive to collect school supplies, toys, sports equipment and animal feed to help Midwest flood victims.Employees have formed Carroll's Community Flood Relief Fund to collect money and supplies for Hancock County, Ill., at the confluence of the Des Moines and Mississippi rivers."We're doing this from the heart. We just want to help people," said Kay Church, a receptionist at the County Office Building.Mrs. Church, an avid walker, is organizing the 6.2-mile (10 kilometer)
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | January 5, 1994
It was 10 days before Christmas. What Bonni Crispin saw was not the preholiday festivities of her hometown, Hampstead. She was in the flood-ravaged Midwest. She saw mud."You could see the line where the water had sat in the houses for a very long time," Ms. Crispin said. "It covered the whole first floor. Silos, knocked over like tin cans, were in the middle of the fields. At one intersection, the road was closed to the right because there was no road. It was all dirt."She went to Missouri and Illinois as part of the Carroll County relief program.
NEWS
September 29, 1993
Manchester alfalfa heading to MidwestOne of Carroll County's first contributions to flood victims in Hancock County, Ill., will be a truckload of alfalfa from Manchester, Micki Smith, deputy director of administrative services, said yesterday.The alfalfa was grown on land irrigated by Manchester's sewage-treatment plant.County public works employee Patrick Hill is working with a local trucking company to send the crop to Hancock County so it can be used to feed farm animals.County employees have formed a Carroll Community Flood Relief Fund to collect money and supplies for the Illinois county, which lies at the confluence of the Des Moines and Mississippi rivers.
NEWS
By Joy Swearingen and Joy Swearingen,Contributing Writer | December 15, 1993
CARTHAGE, Ill. -- "All I wanted was for my kids to have a merry Christmas," said Mary Ellen Carlson, loading 16 boxes of gifts and other household items. "This may be their best Christmas ever."Ms. Carlson lives in Dallas City, Ill., with her four children, ages 16, 14, 10 and 3. They were flooded out of their Pontoosuc, Ill., home when the Mississippi River spilled over its banks over the summer."We lost most of our clothes, furniture and appliances, like most people," Ms. Carlson said. "We set things up on blocks and thought it would be safe."
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
It is a Herculean task.But a Hampstead committee isn't using a river to clean up a royal mess -- it's helping an Illinois county clean up a royal mess caused by a river.Friends for Flood Relief, a committee formed at the Aug. 16 Hampstead Town Council meeting, has adopted Hancock County, Ill. On Saturday, the committee will start collecting school supplies, gift certificates, nonperishable food, and toys for families devastated by this summer's floods.The idea for the project came from Hampstead resident Bonni Crispin.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | September 15, 1993
Hancock County, Ill., would be a neat square of prairie farmland if it weren't for the Mississippi River swirling into its western shore. The river gave the county scenic parks and campgrounds along the "Great River Road" that splits the Midwest from north to south.When the Mississippi overflowed its banks in early summer, the scenery of Hancock County was one of the first to be flooded. Its people still need disaster relief.Bonnie Crispin chairs the small Friends for Flood Relief Committee based in Hampstead.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 14, 2008
Beautine DeCosta-Lee, a retired educator and civil rights activist who participated in the Montgomery bus boycott led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., died of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Kirby Pines retirement community in Memphis, Tenn. The former longtime Northwest Baltimore resident was 95. Beautine Hubert, the granddaughter of slaves, was born in Hancock County, Ga., and was raised near Savannah. "Her parents, John Wesley and Lillie Jones Hubert, were educators," said her daughter, Dr. Miriam DeCosta-Willis, an author who lives in Memphis.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | January 5, 1994
It was 10 days before Christmas. What Bonni Crispin saw was not the preholiday festivities of her hometown, Hampstead. She was in the flood-ravaged Midwest. She saw mud."You could see the line where the water had sat in the houses for a very long time," Ms. Crispin said. "It covered the whole first floor. Silos, knocked over like tin cans, were in the middle of the fields. At one intersection, the road was closed to the right because there was no road. It was all dirt."She went to Missouri and Illinois as part of the Carroll County relief program.
NEWS
By Joy Swearingen and Joy Swearingen,Contributing Writer | December 15, 1993
CARTHAGE, Ill. -- "All I wanted was for my kids to have a merry Christmas," said Mary Ellen Carlson, loading 16 boxes of gifts and other household items. "This may be their best Christmas ever."Ms. Carlson lives in Dallas City, Ill., with her four children, ages 16, 14, 10 and 3. They were flooded out of their Pontoosuc, Ill., home when the Mississippi River spilled over its banks over the summer."We lost most of our clothes, furniture and appliances, like most people," Ms. Carlson said. "We set things up on blocks and thought it would be safe."
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
It snowed Saturday in Hancock County, Illinois, where many farms are still under water from the summer's flood and where residents are eagerly awaiting flood relief from Hampstead and Carroll County."
NEWS
September 29, 1993
Manchester alfalfa heading to MidwestOne of Carroll County's first contributions to flood victims in Hancock County, Ill., will be a truckload of alfalfa from Manchester, Micki Smith, deputy director of administrative services, said yesterday.The alfalfa was grown on land irrigated by Manchester's sewage-treatment plant.County public works employee Patrick Hill is working with a local trucking company to send the crop to Hancock County so it can be used to feed farm animals.County employees have formed a Carroll Community Flood Relief Fund to collect money and supplies for the Illinois county, which lies at the confluence of the Des Moines and Mississippi rivers.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | September 22, 1993
Carroll government workers are organizing a walk-a-thon and starting a drive to collect school supplies, toys, sports equipment and animal feed to help Midwest flood victims.Employees have formed Carroll's Community Flood Relief Fund to collect money and supplies for Hancock County, Ill., at the confluence of the Des Moines and Mississippi rivers."We're doing this from the heart. We just want to help people," said Kay Church, a receptionist at the County Office Building.Mrs. Church, an avid walker, is organizing the 6.2-mile (10 kilometer)
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | September 15, 1993
Hancock County, Ill., would be a neat square of prairie farmland if it weren't for the Mississippi River swirling into its western shore. The river gave the county scenic parks and campgrounds along the "Great River Road" that splits the Midwest from north to south.When the Mississippi overflowed its banks in early summer, the scenery of Hancock County was one of the first to be flooded. Its people still need disaster relief.Bonnie Crispin chairs the small Friends for Flood Relief Committee based in Hampstead.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
It is a Herculean task.But a Hampstead committee isn't using a river to clean up a royal mess -- it's helping an Illinois county clean up a royal mess caused by a river.Friends for Flood Relief, a committee formed at the Aug. 16 Hampstead Town Council meeting, has adopted Hancock County, Ill. On Saturday, the committee will start collecting school supplies, gift certificates, nonperishable food, and toys for families devastated by this summer's floods.The idea for the project came from Hampstead resident Bonni Crispin.
NEWS
October 27, 1993
The first shipment from Carroll Community Flood Relief will start its journey to Hancock County, Ill., Monday. The town of Manchester contributed 1,000 bales of alfalfa to be transported by Roadway Shipping.Future shipments will include proceeds from various fund-raising activities planned throughout the county. They include:* Carroll Community Flood Relief 10K (6.2-mile) Walk-a-Thon from 8 a.m. to noon Nov. 7. Walkers and sponsors are needed. Contact Kay Church at 848-4500.* Carroll County area Cub Scouts have set Nov. 6-7 as collection days.
NEWS
April 1, 1994
The powerful floods that tore apart the Midwest last summerTC have helped, in the aftermath, to forge continuing bonds between those devastated farm towns and dozens of small Maryland communities. Relief efforts continue by many Marylanders who have adopted flooded sister towns along the Mississippi River, a testament to their enduring, helping spirit and generosity.Communities in Iowa, Illinois and Missouri continue to benefit from the flood-relief activities coming from this state. About two dozen Maryland municipalities maintain their ties with flooded communities that are still faced with immense obstacles to recovery.
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