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Hampton Mansion

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NEWS
September 27, 1990
John Ridgely III, a direct descendant of the builder of Towson's 18th-century Hampton Mansion and the last to live on the estate, died Sunday at College Manor of congestive heart failure. He was 79.A memorial service for Mr. Ridgely was being held today at Trinity Episcopal Church, 120 Allegheny Ave., Towson.He had lived since the late 1940s at his home, Spring Hollow, which he built on the Hampton property. The house was built about the time his father turned the Hampton Mansion, which dated to 1790, over to the National Park Service in 1948.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
The Perry Hall Mansion, one of Baltimore County's most historically significant buildings, sits on a hill in a fairly fresh coat of white stucco, poised between redemption and decay.  The new stucco is already peeling in spots and the straw-colored grass is long enough to bury your boots. While there are new windows, heating, air conditioning, electrical and fire alarm systems, wallpaper is peeling everywhere, plaster is cracking, and the place seems abandoned behind a wire fence and forbidding sign: "Baltimore County Property.
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FEATURES
March 5, 1991
CURRENT volunteers' news and needs:Hampton National Historical Site needs volunteers for its May 5 Hampton Heritage Festival being held 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Hampton mansion. For volunteer details, call Bill Curtis, 962-0688.Visiting Nurse Association Hospice Inc. wants volunteers in the Howard County area to assist with patient care. Call Denise Wheatley Rowe, 332-0880.The Maryland Center for Independent Living wants volunteers to help organize and put on its annual Wheelchair-A-Thon being held June 3 at Lake Montebello in order to raise funds for independent living services for severely disabled adults.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
While many garden clubs work to shed the dusty image of white-gloved flower-arrangers for a more modern one of community service, the members of the Glen Arm Garden Club are busy helping others, well, arrange flowers. On this morning in December, members of the club are making their regular visit to Morningside House assisted living in Parkville, where they help a dozen or so residents create flower arrangements for the dining room and another one each can take to her own room.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Meredith Schlow and Glenn Small and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | June 25, 1991
One very strong thief or, more likely, several thieves, drove onto the 64-acre Hampton Mansion property in Towson and stole a rare cast-iron dolphin valued at $12,000.The thieves got quietly past the cottage of caretaker Adam Karalius, who was asleep, the night of June 16 to get to the Georgian-style mansion, built in 1790.There, they used tools and a spray lubricant to loosen three cast-iron bolts that had held the dolphin to a marble horse trough. The dolphin weighs 125 to 150 pounds."They must have driven up here in a truck or van," said Carol Rubright, a member of the mansion staff, noting that the dolphin probably was too heavy to be carried away on foot.
NEWS
October 17, 1996
THE LOSS OF an on-site superintendent, perhaps permanently, at Towson's Hampton Mansion is the latest in a long history of neglect by the National Park Service. This situation is not unique to Hampton. The National Historic Trust recently listed historic buildings owned by the National Park Service on a list of "endangered" cultural amenities.Though charged with the care of both natural and cultural resources, the park service expends more energy and money on the former. Congress' cost-cutting has not helped places like Hampton, either.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | November 30, 2007
Visitors are likely to be awed by the opulent 18th- and 19th-century furnishings that fill the historic Hampton Mansion in Towson, which reopens this morning after being closed for nearly three years for a $3.3 million renovation. But guests are not supposed to notice what the staff considers some of the building's most impressive upgrades. About 100 fire sprinkler heads have been installed flush with the ceilings -- part of a fire-suppression system that is so sensitive people are not supposed to smoke even near the exterior doors.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1996
Preservationists and historians are worried about the fate of Hampton mansion, called Towson's crown jewel and an exceptional example of 18th-century plantation life.As its superintendent awaits a transfer, many wonder whether the historic site, which draws 40,000 visitors a year, will get the attention it deserves from the National Park Service, which runs it."Hampton is a real treasure. It's a remarkable piece of our heritage," said David Chase, executive director of Preservation Maryland, a statewide group.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
After years of battling budget deficits and flagging public interest, stately Hampton Mansion in Towson -- considered a prime example of 18th-century plantation life -- enters the next millennium with a new lease on life.Today, as Hampton celebrates 50 years as a national park, the park's fund-raising arm is engaged in a $1.5 million capital campaign to pump money into the grand manor on Hampton Lane near the Beltway and to refurbish deteriorating farm buildings and slave quarters."One of the purposes of the campaign is to talk to people about Hampton," said Rhoda M. Dorsey, president of Historic Hampton Inc., which is seeking donations from foundations, corporations and other parties.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1997
For more than two centuries, stately Hampton mansion in Towson has survived wars, changing economies and encroaching suburbia.But the next few months could be the most critical for the historic home -- visited by Marquis de Lafayette and President Theodore Roosevelt -- that is operated as a historical site by the National Park Service.The main roof is leaking. Precious artifacts are stored in rooms that lack heat and air conditioning. The number of visitors is static. The mansion has no permanent, on-site superintendent.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
Salary: $20,000 Age: 52 Time on the job: 19 months. How he got started: Alan Gephardt began his career working in therapeutic recreation at a nursing home. He later worked at the Baltimore County Department of Aging, managing senior centers among other responsibilities. After several years, he also began volunteering at the former Baltimore City Life Museums. He then went back to school, receiving a master's degree in history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. For the past 15 years, Gephardt has worked in the museum field creating programs and managing volunteers at historical sites such as the Phoenix Shot Tower and Mount Clare Museum House.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
BGE seeks cause of electrical fire About 175 senior and disabled residents of a Towson apartment complex remained displaced yesterday as utility crews worked to repair an underground electrical cable. Burning underground wires forced the residents of the Virginia Towers complex to evacuate Sunday. A similar problem prompted an evacuation of the 15-story building in August. "We're searching for the root cause," said Linda Foy, a spokeswoman for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. She said service would probably be restored by this afternoon.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | November 30, 2007
Visitors are likely to be awed by the opulent 18th- and 19th-century furnishings that fill the historic Hampton Mansion in Towson, which reopens this morning after being closed for nearly three years for a $3.3 million renovation. But guests are not supposed to notice what the staff considers some of the building's most impressive upgrades. About 100 fire sprinkler heads have been installed flush with the ceilings -- part of a fire-suppression system that is so sensitive people are not supposed to smoke even near the exterior doors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | April 1, 2007
Mary H. "Rosalie" Oster, a homemaker and volunteer, died in her sleep Tuesday at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. She was 97. Mary Rosalie Eugenia Hammond was born at home in Roland Park and raised there and in Sparks. She was a 1926 graduate of Bryn Mawr School, where she played basketball and field hockey. Mrs. Oster was the second-oldest living alumna of Bryn Mawr and was recently honored by the school, family members said. Mrs. Oster earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1930 from Smith College, and after touring Europe, moved into a Bolton Hill boardinghouse owned by her mother.
NEWS
June 24, 2006
Sara M. McFarland, a homemaker who performed in amateur theater productions, died of pulmonary fibrosis Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 84. She was born Sara Murphy in San Diego and was raised in Murfreesboro, Tenn. She earned a bachelor's degree in theater from Peabody College, now part of Vanderbilt University, in 1943. During the 1940s, Mrs. McFarland performed at the Nashville Community Playhouse and summer stock theater in New England. She was married in 1946 to Frank Russell McFarland, a horticulturist, who died in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | September 29, 2005
FUN IN FELLS POINT Fells Point will be hopping this weekend, thanks to the Fells Point Fun Festival. The annual event, presented by the Fells Point Preservation Society, offers an array of entertainment, exhibits, kids' activities and food. More than 100 arts and craft vendors will sell their wares, and there will be an Arts on the Pier fine-art display, an International Bazaar, a Fun Fest Flea Market and La Plaza Hispana. There will be five stages of entertainment, carnival rides and games, 50 food vendors and more.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
Dressed in pristine cooking whites, Yvonne Barber has been whipping up tasty chicken salad, crab cakes and little beaten biscuits at historic Hampton Mansion in Towson for 43 years.She has served the traditional Maryland fare to generations of visitors who have enjoyed leisurely lunches and special occasions in the quaint tearoom that recalls a genteel era of sherry sipping and white-jacketed waiters.But the long-standing Baltimore-area tradition is about to end.A week ago, the National Park Service, which runs the 1790 Georgian mansion where the tearoom is tucked into the original kitchen, decided to eliminate the concession as of Dec. 31. Officials say a restaurant is not needed and poses a fire hazard.
NEWS
August 15, 1995
The drawing on the Aug. 12 Saturday Mail Box page incorrectly identified the house in the Maryland Sketchbook as the Hampton Mansion. Actually, it is a drawing of the "Lower House" on the grounds of the Hampton Mansion.The Sun regrets the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Claire Wang and Claire Wang,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2005
You don't have to drive to Antietam or Gettysburg to walk in the footsteps of soldiers. Baltimoreans often drive past Civil War sites and monuments on their daily commute. Before the Battle of Monocacy in the summer of 1864, Confederate soldiers pushed into Baltimore, intending to cut off the city and Washington from the north and release Confederate prisoners of war in Point Lookout to take the pressure off Gen. Robert E. Lee at Petersburg. Led by Cavalry Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, they arrived in Cockeysville on July 10, destroying telegraph lines and tearing up the track along with Northern Central Railroad.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
The music room in the Hampton Mansion, with its gilded portraits and ornately carved furnishings, evokes Victorian times. The master bedroom's fine linens and floral wallpaper reflect the Federal period. And the formal dining room is painted in Prussian blue and decorated with an eye toward classical European tastes. But soon the historic rooms will have a 21st-century feel - from air conditioning. The $1.3 million project, which also includes fire sprinklers and a new heating system, will close the 18th-century mansion in Towson for much of the year.
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