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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Developers unveiled a $10 million restoration project yesterday that will preserve a Hampstead landmark and create much-needed housing for seniors. In a meeting at North Carroll Senior Center, about 50 prospective tenants of the Hampstead School project saw plans for restoring the two-story brick building, built in 1917, and expanding it, allowing for 84 one- and two-bedroom units. Groundbreaking on the 5-acre property is set for early spring, with about 18 months allotted for construction.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
North Carroll Middle School was flooded with phone calls Tuesday after an erroneous news report that a student had shot and killed herself inside the Hampstead school. A 13-year-old girl at North Carroll Middle had committed suicide off school grounds, and school officials said teachers and counselors were talking to students about the loss of a fellow student during morning classes. Dana Falls, director of student services for Carroll County Public Schools, said that shortly after noon, the school received a flood of calls from parents worried about the reports of violence.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
About 270 pupils from Westminster's severely crowded West Middle School would be moved to Hampstead under a plan officials are considering to avoid the costs of a new school.If approved, the proposal would eliminate the need for a new $15 million middle school in Westminster, under consideration for years, school officials said.But it could cause problems for the transferred pupils, who would be pulled out of Westminster for three years to attend a new middle school in Hampstead, then return to Westminster High School, parents said.
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | October 26, 2011
A North Carroll Middle School eighth-grader is being charged as a juvenile after he voluntarily surrendered a handgun he brought to the Hampstead school Wednesday, Oct. 26, to a school staff member he went to for help. Maryland State Police identified the student is a 15-year-old male. He is not being identified because he is being charged as a juvenile. According to police accounts, shortly before 11 a.m. Wednesday, the student was in the school lunchroom for his lunch period when he approached an assistant principal in the room and said he was troubled with thoughts of harming himself.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2002
The former treasurer of the Hampstead Elementary School PTA was arrested yesterday on dozens of theft charges after being accused of taking tens of thousands of dollars from the group for his personal use over a two-year-period, police said. John N. Biggs Jr., 39, of the 1600 block of Old Manchester Road, Westminster, has been charged with 39 counts of theft of more than $500, three counts of theft of less than $500 and a theft scheme, said Capt. Jay Gribbin of the Hampstead Police Department.
NEWS
By DAVID P. GREISMAN and DAVID P. GREISMAN,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
With the North Carroll High School marching band leading them, 103 Hampstead Elementary third-graders walked around the building, carrying paper and plastic cups with plants sprouting out of them. Clad in gray T-shirts with "Take Pride in America Crew" written in red, white and blue lettering, the pupils came to the Residences at the Hampstead School bearing gifts. For a month, the third-graders had used seeds provided by the America the Beautiful Fund to grow cucumbers, corn, zucchini, kale and other vegetables to plant at the Residences at the Hampstead School, a senior living facility that had once been the local elementary school.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Developers unveiled a $10 million restoration project yesterday that will preserve a Hampstead landmark and create much-needed housing for seniors. In a meeting at North Carroll Senior Center, about 50 prospective tenants of the Hampstead School project saw plans for restoring the two-story brick building, built in 1917, and expanding it, allowing for 84 one- and two-bedroom units. Groundbreaking on the 5-acre property is set for early spring, with about 18 months allotted for construction.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
North Carroll Middle School was flooded with phone calls Tuesday after an erroneous news report that a student had shot and killed herself inside the Hampstead school. A 13-year-old girl at North Carroll Middle had committed suicide off school grounds, and school officials said teachers and counselors were talking to students about the loss of a fellow student during morning classes. Dana Falls, director of student services for Carroll County Public Schools, said that shortly after noon, the school received a flood of calls from parents worried about the reports of violence.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Developers unveiled a $10 million restoration project yesterday that will preserve a Hampstead landmark and create much-needed housing for seniors. In a meeting at North Carroll Senior Center, about 50 prospective tenants of the Hampstead School project saw plans for restoring the two-story brick building, built in 1917, and expanding it, allowing for 84 one- and two-bedroom units. Groundbreaking on the 5-acre property is set for early spring, with about 18 months allotted for construction.
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | October 26, 2011
A North Carroll Middle School eighth-grader is being charged as a juvenile after he voluntarily surrendered a handgun he brought to the Hampstead school Wednesday, Oct. 26, to a school staff member he went to for help. Maryland State Police identified the student is a 15-year-old male. He is not being identified because he is being charged as a juvenile. According to police accounts, shortly before 11 a.m. Wednesday, the student was in the school lunchroom for his lunch period when he approached an assistant principal in the room and said he was troubled with thoughts of harming himself.
NEWS
By DAVID P. GREISMAN and DAVID P. GREISMAN,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
With the North Carroll High School marching band leading them, 103 Hampstead Elementary third-graders walked around the building, carrying paper and plastic cups with plants sprouting out of them. Clad in gray T-shirts with "Take Pride in America Crew" written in red, white and blue lettering, the pupils came to the Residences at the Hampstead School bearing gifts. For a month, the third-graders had used seeds provided by the America the Beautiful Fund to grow cucumbers, corn, zucchini, kale and other vegetables to plant at the Residences at the Hampstead School, a senior living facility that had once been the local elementary school.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Developers unveiled a $10 million restoration project yesterday that will preserve a Hampstead landmark and create much-needed housing for seniors. In a meeting at North Carroll Senior Center, about 50 prospective tenants of the Hampstead School project saw plans for restoring the two-story brick building, built in 1917, and expanding it, allowing for 84 one- and two-bedroom units. Groundbreaking on the 5-acre property is set for early spring, with about 18 months allotted for construction.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Developers unveiled a $10 million restoration project yesterday that will preserve a Hampstead landmark and create much-needed housing for seniors. In a meeting at North Carroll Senior Center, about 50 prospective tenants of the Hampstead School project saw plans for restoring the two-story brick building, built in 1917, and expanding it, allowing for 84 one- and two-bedroom units. Groundbreaking on the 5-acre property is set for early spring, with about 18 months allotted for construction.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Developers unveiled a $10 million restoration project yesterday that will preserve a Hampstead landmark and create much-needed housing for seniors. In a meeting at North Carroll Senior Center, about 50 prospective tenants of the Hampstead School project saw plans for restoring the two-story brick building, built in 1917, and expanding it, allowing for 84 one- and two-bedroom units. Groundbreaking on the 5-acre property is set for early spring, with about 18 months allotted for construction.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Redevelopment of Hampstead's old elementary school is set to begin, now that developers have learned that they are to receive $2.3 million in state tax credits for a project described by town leaders as the centerpiece of Main Street revitalization efforts. After failing to obtain the credits in two previous bids, the town's development team was among 11 groups awarded money in this year's round of allocations. The transformation of the aging building into an 88-unit affordable senior housing center could begin as soon as summer next year, said Town Manager Ken Decker.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2002
The long battle between Carroll County commissioners and Hampstead's leaders over the fate of the town's old elementary school building will likely come to a head in the next few days. The commissioners plan to sell the former Hampstead Elementary School to the highest bidder Tuesday. But a judge could halt the planned auction at a hearing tomorrow, when town leaders will make a final plea for control of the property, which they call the centerpiece of their downtown revitalization efforts.
NEWS
November 14, 2000
Carroll County and Hampstead will jointly ask developers to submit proposals to redevelop the old elementary school at the town's center. "We're going to put out a request for proposals and see what the proposals would be," Commissioner Donald I. Dell said. "We'd like something everyone can agree on. In the meantime, the county will maintain ownership." The town is eager to find a developer before the two-story brick building deteriorates further, and municipal officials are eager to work with the county.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Redevelopment of Hampstead's old elementary school is set to begin, now that developers have learned that they are to receive $2.3 million in state tax credits for a project described by town leaders as the centerpiece of Main Street revitalization efforts. After failing to obtain the credits in two previous bids, the town's development team was among 11 groups awarded money in this year's round of allocations. The transformation of the aging building into an 88-unit affordable senior housing center could begin as soon as summer next year, said Town Manager Ken Decker.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2002
Carroll County's PTAs and PTOs are expected to donate money to help the Hampstead Elementary association pay for pupil enrichment programs and activities, after the theft of more than $60,000 from the school's PTA fund. Members of the Friendship Valley PTO are organizing the fund drive, enlisting the county's 30 other parent-teacher organizations to make sure Hampstead's programs don't skip a beat. Police charged Hampstead's PTA treasurer, John N. Biggs Jr., with the theft of more than $60,000 in the association's funds this month.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Mary Gail Hare and Childs Walker and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2002
He handled the PTA's money as the organization hummed along on fund-raising drives for a new playground and a batch of wireless computers. He shared his professional expertise as a banker with fourth- and fifth-graders, organizing a savings program to show them real-world methods of managing money. John N. Biggs Jr. even planted trees around Hampstead Elementary School. "He would attend all of the field trips, and whenever a teacher needed someone to do something, he was there," said Monica Smith, principal at the school, which Biggs' two children attended.
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