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By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | April 7, 1993
Two Hampstead residents, Greg Jugo and Scott Laderer, declared themselves candidates for the May 11 Town Council race yesterday.Mr. Jugo manages a Roy Rogers restaurant in downtown Baltimore.He said he decided to run because "I feel like everybody should pitch in and do something."Mr. Jugo said, "A lot of it has to do with my dad," the late Frank Jugo, who ran unsuccessfully for the Baltimore City Council in the 1960s and was very interested in politics.The main issue facing Hampstead, Mr. Jugo said, is growth: "We're going to need some growth, but at the same time we need to keep the community sound."
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
State officials told a group of Hampstead area residents last night that they are still unsure how their wells became contaminated by a toxic gasoline additive. Herbert Meade, chief of oil control for the Maryland Department of the Environment, told about 40 people at the Hampstead Town Hall that officials have investigated four possible sources for the methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, in their wells. Investigators have checked a Shell Jiffy Mart service station in town and three residences, including one where they discovered a leaking underground gas tank.
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NEWS
By Aglaia Pikounis and Aglaia Pikounis,Staff Writer Staff writer Katherine Richards contributed to this article | June 23, 1993
The prospect of shutting down Route 30 for up to a week to renovate the CSX railroad crossing in the northern part of town does not sit well with some Hampstead residents and Town Council members.The installation of a rubber and asphalt crossing will make the road surface smoother and more durable, wrote M. D. Ramsey, division engineer for CSX Transportation, in an April 29 letter to the State Highway Administration.When a Hampstead resident asked at Monday's Town Council meeting whether the work could be done at night, Councilman Arthur Moler said the State Highway Administration would make the final decision on the timing.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 18, 2004
State police arrested two suspects after a resident reported seeing two men trying to steal property from vehicles near his home in Hampstead. The resident, who spotted the suspicious activity about 3 a.m. Saturday, got detailed descriptions, enabling a state trooper to spot a stolen vehicle that the men apparently had been using. With help from a state police helicopter and a police dog on the ground, troopers found one suspect under a tree in a nearby neighborhood. The other was arrested at his residence, where a second stolen vehicle was found nearby, police said.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | January 19, 1992
A town government plan to save water with conservation kits appears to be a dry well.Despite several bans the last six years on outdoor water use, there is no groundswell of support for town efforts to conserve the resource."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1998
To the delight of many Hampstead residents, Maryland Midland Railway Inc. has contributed $500 to the restoration of the town's historic train depot.In a letter April 24, Paul D. Denton, Maryland Midland's president and chief operations officer, promised to contribute more after Maryland Midland completes its purchase of the line that runs through Hampstead. CSX Transportation Inc. owns the line."When our offer to purchase that line becomes reality, we'll double the amount in the attached check, and I'll deliver the second one personally by riding to Hampstead in one of our locomotives," Denton wrote.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
Mike Jones moved to a 3-acre farm near Hampstead nine years ago so his children could experience a rural lifestyle. But with shopping plazas, warehouses and subdivisions sprouting up around Hampstead, he worries this lifestyle might be in jeopardy. "As a Wal-Mart goes in, as the place grows bigger, we're losing that [rural] atmosphere," said Jones, who moved to North Carroll from Arbutus. "We're losing that ability to know people in the area." Jones was among nearly 20 Hampstead-area residents who attended a workshop Monday night to discuss proposals for the town's comprehensive community plan.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
Indifferent to - or perhaps unaware of - a proposed 179 percent sewer connection fee increase and new sewer maintenance fee, Hampstead residents were sparsely represented at a public hearing last night to discuss the planned changes with county commissioners. County staff, elected county and town officials and newspaper reporters outnumbered the handful of residents at the half-hour meeting in the Town Council chambers where county Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman explained the proposed changes.
NEWS
November 11, 1994
Something is out of kilter when the chairman of the planning and zoning commission in the town of Hampstead says that public comment isn't "required" at commission meetings. Just because residents have been rambunctious in recent meetings is no reason to eliminate public input on matters before the commission. Far from discouraging broad discussion of planning matters, town officials would be better off to encourage more of it.Isn't the commission a "public" body acting on behalf of the townspeople of Hampstead?
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1994
A state administrative judge yesterday granted Hampstead residents Dorothy and Herbert Hewlett more than a month's delay for their appeal of a water appropriation permit granted in November to the Black and Decker plant 100 yards from their house.The Hewletts sought the delay after the town and county dropped their appeals last week, after reaching a settlement with Black and Decker (U.S.) Inc. Mr. Hewlett said yesterday that the couple, who had planned to rely on town and state experts for testimony, need time to find and subpoena new witnesses.
NEWS
February 19, 2003
Hampstead is asking for residents' continued cooperation during the cleanup of this week's snowstorm. Because of the forecast of heavy rain for the weekend, town officials are asking residents to help by shoveling snow away from storm drains and fire hydrants, so melting snow and rain can run off properly and prevent icing conditions when temperatures drop at night. Officials also remind residents that shoveling, plowing and putting snow in the street with snow blowers slow snow clearing.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Hampstead residents will have a second opportunity tonight to register their distress over a planned extension of Boxwood Drive that many say would turn the residential street into a high-speed throughway. As part of a general public hearing on Hampstead's reworked comprehensive plan, residents will plead their case to a panel of county and town officials. The Boxwood extension, an approved and funded project, hadn't caused many ripples in Hampstead before a Town Council meeting Feb. 12, when about 30 residents showed up with stories of how their children would be in danger traversing the extended road.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
A 3-year-old Rottweiler named Enigma will lose either his home or his life. His owner, Linda Wrobleski, said she will move. Enigma's latest victim, a 9-year-old golden retriever named Sam, rests at home, covered with nasty bites. So ends a week when residents of Century Street in Hampstead have felt terrorized by the specter of a vicious dog. Beverly Haugh said she and the 70-pound Sam were standing in their yard in the 800 block of Century St. about 9:30 a.m. Aug. 10 when Enigma and a yellow Labrador approached.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
Mike Jones moved to a 3-acre farm near Hampstead nine years ago so his children could experience a rural lifestyle. But with shopping plazas, warehouses and subdivisions sprouting up around Hampstead, he worries this lifestyle might be in jeopardy. "As a Wal-Mart goes in, as the place grows bigger, we're losing that [rural] atmosphere," said Jones, who moved to North Carroll from Arbutus. "We're losing that ability to know people in the area." Jones was among nearly 20 Hampstead-area residents who attended a workshop Monday night to discuss proposals for the town's comprehensive community plan.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
Indifferent to - or perhaps unaware of - a proposed 179 percent sewer connection fee increase and new sewer maintenance fee, Hampstead residents were sparsely represented at a public hearing last night to discuss the planned changes with county commissioners. County staff, elected county and town officials and newspaper reporters outnumbered the handful of residents at the half-hour meeting in the Town Council chambers where county Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman explained the proposed changes.
NEWS
March 22, 2000
Edwin Way of Hampstead, a senior at Friends School in Baltimore, will compete for a scholarship through the 2000 National Merit Scholarship Corp. program. He was one of 10 Friends students to continue the competition for scholarships totaling more than $28 million. Fire Manchester: Firefighters from Manchester, Hampstead and Lineboro responded at 12: 11 a.m. yesterday to a chimney fire in the 3200 block of Main St. Units were out 21 minutes.
NEWS
October 3, 1994
It seems as though polite debate over how to best control growth in Hampstead may no longer be possible. At the most recent meeting of the town's Planning and Zoning Commission, an obviously frustrated member of the commission lost control and inappropriately berated a town resident for criticizing the public body. The incident was quite ugly and some members of the audience feared that a fistfight would break out.At the root of the controversy is how to ensure that Hampstead's explosive growth doesn't destroy the town's quality of life.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1996
After more than a year of legal wrangling, a Manchester developer has won court approval to begin expanding North Carroll Farms, a Hampstead subdivision.In the same Jan. 5 decision, Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. also ruled that a recent Hampstead law allowing any taxpayer to appeal decisions of the town's Planning and Zoning Commission is invalid.Before the law was passed last summer, only adjacent property owners or residents deemed "aggrieved" had standing to appeal commission decisions to the town's Board of Zoning Appeals.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2000
A Hampstead man, one of three arrested in the severe beating of an off-duty Sykesville police officer last summer, was sentenced yesterday to nine months in the county jail. Clinton E. Shamer, 23, of the 2600 block of Hoffman Mill Road was found guilty in Carroll Circuit Court on Dec. 26 after entering a not-guilty plea to the first-degree assault of Officer Shawn Kilgore and the second-degree assault of Kelli Dickerson, a friend of the policeman. The attack occurred at 1: 38 a.m. July 25 outside Taco Bell in the 600 block of Baltimore Blvd.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1998
About 60 people gathered at Hampstead's Volunteer Fire Hall last night for a town meeting and presentation of a plan to revitalize Main Street.Refreshments and door prizes were added to sweeten the attraction to an open house for the preliminary draft of the Main Street Revitalization Plan.Residents were invited to help:Create a vibrant downtown.Strengthen downtown's economic climate.Enhance its visual appearance.Improve vehicular and pedestrian circulation.The Hampstead Main Street Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee held the event, more than a year after its first question-and-answer session.
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