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By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 17, 1996
CONCORD, N.H. -- In 1964, the Republican presidential primary here was supposed to be a contest between conservative Barry M. Goldwater and liberal Nelson A. Rockefeller.But a month before the vote, two young men, Paul Grindle and David Goldberg, opened an office across from the state Capitol and began a campaign to draft Henry Cabot Lodge, then ambassador to South Vietnam. While the two "serious" candidates built campaign organizations, the two amateurs sent postcards to every Republican household in the state, on which they could pledge support for Mr. Lodge and mail it in.It seemed like a pointless exercise until Mr. Grindle and Mr. Goldberg invited skeptical reporters to open the mail with them.
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | January 9, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The night of the living dead in New Hampshire was the dawn of a new campaign. Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and John McCain, once written off as primary losers, resurrected their candidacies last night and set the presidential race on a new, potentially longer course that few would have predicted. Clinton's comeback, even more astonishing than her husband's in 1992, when he finished second, reshaped a Democratic contest in which Illinois Sen. Barack Obama had begun to look unstoppable.
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- George Bush could scarcely find a more demoralized place than recession-wracked New Hampshire to test his re-election campaign, a new poll confirms.The state's voters feel worse about the way things are going in the nation and in their own lives than do other Americans, give Mr. Bush a lower job rating and think the political system needs more shaking up, according to the survey by the Times Mirror Center for the People & the Press, a foundation financed by Times Mirror, which publishes The Baltimore Sun and other newspapers.
NEWS
January 3, 2008
Surely no one would set out to create the absurd presidential nomination process that finally gets under way today with the Iowa caucuses. Yet the surrogates standing in there and in New Hampshire next week for the vast majority of American voters who won't have direct contact with candidates have done a good job of separating the corn from the husk while probably not signaling the final choice. In fact, both Republican and Democratic contests are so close, odds are the competition will continue in earnest for at least a few more weeks - maybe not until Maryland votes on Feb. 12, but longer than usual.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | February 13, 1992
CONCORD, N.H. -- Encouraged by Gov. Mario M. Cuomo's unwillingness to ask them to stop, organizers of the draft-Cuomo drive here released television and radio ads yesterday urging New Hampshire voters to write in his name in next Tuesday's Democratic presidential primary.In the television ad, the New York governor is seen and heard on the left side of a split screen speaking about the recession, as his name is slowly printed, white on black for a blackboard effect, on the right side. The radio ad features a longer segment of the same remarks.
NEWS
By Robert A. Jordan | May 27, 1999
IN NEW Hampshire, the candidacy of presidential hopeful Bill Bradley in 1999 is looking more like the candidacy of Paul Tsongas in 1991 -- with a few key exceptions.Vice President Al Gore, the acknowledged front-runner for the Democratic nomination, would be wise to familiarize himself with the surprise victory Tsongas pulled off in the New Hampshire primary in 1992. If Mr. Gore did, he might take Mr. Bradley a little more seriously.The little-known advantage that Tsongas, the former U.S. senator from Massachusetts who died in 1997, had eight years ago is basically the same advantage Mr. Bradley will have in the 2000 primary: He's considered a long-shot (a special appeal to voters seeking a fiscally conservative liberal)
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 20, 2004
MANCHESTER, N.H. - Survivors of last night's Iowa caucuses will be hitting the icy ground here today to find a vastly different state than the New Hampshire of just a week ago, with Sen. John Kerry and retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark surging and former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean scrambling to retain his front-runner status. Kerry, a four-term senator from neighboring Massachusetts, hopes to parlay his smashing come-from-behind victory in Iowa into the kind of political momentum that until last week had eluded him in the Granite State.
NEWS
January 3, 2008
Surely no one would set out to create the absurd presidential nomination process that finally gets under way today with the Iowa caucuses. Yet the surrogates standing in there and in New Hampshire next week for the vast majority of American voters who won't have direct contact with candidates have done a good job of separating the corn from the husk while probably not signaling the final choice. In fact, both Republican and Democratic contests are so close, odds are the competition will continue in earnest for at least a few more weeks - maybe not until Maryland votes on Feb. 12, but longer than usual.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 29, 1999
HANOVER, N.H. -- The five Republican rivals nipping at the heels of front-running George W. Bush attacked the absent Texas governor at a nationally televised candidate forum last night in the leadoff primary state.With Bush deciding to skip the "town meeting," the remaining candidates answered questions from New Hampshire voters on issues ranging from health care and the flat tax to gay rights and abortion.Bush's absence, which almost certainly reduced viewership for the event as well as its importance, rankled his opponents -- and at least one of the audience members, who said she had hoped to ask him about the influence of big money in his campaign.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 9, 1999
ALTON, N.H. -- On a cold, drizzly morning this week, Bill Davies woke up itching for a candidate fix. So he jumped out of bed to get to a 7: 45 a.m. town hall meeting where Sen. John McCain was speaking.Then he followed the Republican presidential hopeful in the rain to American Legion Post 72 here. By lunch, he had gripped McCain's hand and had looked him in the eye. Twice."He showed me the man behind the politician," Davies said. "That's important."Only in New Hampshire is a candidate's personal touch considered a voter's birthright.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 25, 2004
CLAREMONT, N.H. - She watched. She waited. She read up. And now, just days before primary day, Cheryl Hayes is finally getting around to deciding whom to vote for in Tuesday's Democratic primary here. But she won't be rushed. "I leave it open until right before - and I mean right before," Hayes, 50, of Charlestown, said while waiting for Howard Dean to show up at the opera house that doubles as this town's city hall. "That's why I'm here." In the final days before the primary, as many as one in four New Hampshire voters, like Hayes, has yet to decide on a candidate, polls show.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 20, 2004
MANCHESTER, N.H. - Survivors of last night's Iowa caucuses will be hitting the icy ground here today to find a vastly different state than the New Hampshire of just a week ago, with Sen. John Kerry and retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark surging and former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean scrambling to retain his front-runner status. Kerry, a four-term senator from neighboring Massachusetts, hopes to parlay his smashing come-from-behind victory in Iowa into the kind of political momentum that until last week had eluded him in the Granite State.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 6, 2000
MILFORD, N.H. - The foliage is long past its prime here, and so is the presidential campaign of 2000. Just over nine months ago, New Hampshire was the nation's political capital, the scene of bitterly contested primaries in both parties. This was the place where Sen. John McCain, riding his Straight Talk Express bus, electrified the political world by defeating George W. Bush by 18 percentage points in the Republican primary. This was also the place where Bill Bradley, the former senator from New Jersey, threw a scare into Vice President Al Gore in the Democratic primary before losing narrowly after committing a series of campaign blunders.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 9, 1999
ALTON, N.H. -- On a cold, drizzly morning this week, Bill Davies woke up itching for a candidate fix. So he jumped out of bed to get to a 7: 45 a.m. town hall meeting where Sen. John McCain was speaking.Then he followed the Republican presidential hopeful in the rain to American Legion Post 72 here. By lunch, he had gripped McCain's hand and had looked him in the eye. Twice."He showed me the man behind the politician," Davies said. "That's important."Only in New Hampshire is a candidate's personal touch considered a voter's birthright.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 29, 1999
HANOVER, N.H. -- The five Republican rivals nipping at the heels of front-running George W. Bush attacked the absent Texas governor at a nationally televised candidate forum last night in the leadoff primary state.With Bush deciding to skip the "town meeting," the remaining candidates answered questions from New Hampshire voters on issues ranging from health care and the flat tax to gay rights and abortion.Bush's absence, which almost certainly reduced viewership for the event as well as its importance, rankled his opponents -- and at least one of the audience members, who said she had hoped to ask him about the influence of big money in his campaign.
NEWS
By Robert A. Jordan | May 27, 1999
IN NEW Hampshire, the candidacy of presidential hopeful Bill Bradley in 1999 is looking more like the candidacy of Paul Tsongas in 1991 -- with a few key exceptions.Vice President Al Gore, the acknowledged front-runner for the Democratic nomination, would be wise to familiarize himself with the surprise victory Tsongas pulled off in the New Hampshire primary in 1992. If Mr. Gore did, he might take Mr. Bradley a little more seriously.The little-known advantage that Tsongas, the former U.S. senator from Massachusetts who died in 1997, had eight years ago is basically the same advantage Mr. Bradley will have in the 2000 primary: He's considered a long-shot (a special appeal to voters seeking a fiscally conservative liberal)
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | February 19, 1996
BEDFORD, N.H. -- Three questions hold the key to tomorrow's New Hampshire primary .Can Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole hang on to enough Republicans to achieve the 28 to 30 percent of the vote needed to succeed? Polls show him with a hard core of 20 to 22 percent of the vote among party activists but little evidence of enthusiasm among less involved Republicans. In short, he still has some persuading to do.Second, is Patrick J. Buchanan a threat to win here or just the flavor of the week?
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | February 19, 1996
BEDFORD, N.H. -- Three questions hold the key to tomorrow's New Hampshire primary .Can Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole hang on to enough Republicans to achieve the 28 to 30 percent of the vote needed to succeed? Polls show him with a hard core of 20 to 22 percent of the vote among party activists but little evidence of enthusiasm among less involved Republicans. In short, he still has some persuading to do.Second, is Patrick J. Buchanan a threat to win here or just the flavor of the week?
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