Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHampshire Primary
IN THE NEWS

Hampshire Primary

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 2000
NASHUA, N.H. -- With the same dizzy energy that characterized his insurgent campaign, Sen. John McCain heralded his surprise landslide victory last night as a message of change and a challenge to big money in politics. "Today, the Republican Party has recovered its heritage of reform," a beaming McCain told hundreds of buoyant supporters here. "My friends, a wonderful New Hampshire campaign has come to an end, but a great national crusade has begun." In 73 days of campaigning, 114 town hall meetings and countless road trips from early spring through snowy winter, McCain attacked the New Hampshire primary with the zeal of a prizefighter in his last bout.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | January 9, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The night of the living dead in New Hampshire was the dawn of a new campaign. Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and John McCain, once written off as primary losers, resurrected their candidacies last night and set the presidential race on a new, potentially longer course that few would have predicted. Clinton's comeback, even more astonishing than her husband's in 1992, when he finished second, reshaped a Democratic contest in which Illinois Sen. Barack Obama had begun to look unstoppable.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 2000
BEDFORD, N.H. -- John McCain's runaway triumph in the New Hampshire primary sends two messages to the Republican Party and the nation. The first, and more obvious, is that the voters of 2000 prize a candidate who projects authenticity and gravitas and that they are largely unmoved by the advice of other politicians. The second message to all those Republican leaders who have been embarrassed by the result here -- far more menacing -- is that their candidate, Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, might be incapable of selling himself as a national political leader in the general election in November.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | January 8, 2008
HANOVER, N.H. -- "The Comeback Kid is always uppermost in my mind," Sen. John McCain said the other day, with a gleam in his eye. "I look forward to that name." Tonight, he just might get it. "We're going to win," the Arizona Republican told a couple of hundred voters yesterday on the snow-covered town square in Keene, N.H., "because [voters] have seen me. They've seen me at 101 town hall meetings. They've seen me, and they've been able to ask the questions." Left for dead beside the presidential campaign highway last spring, McCain has pulled himself back into contention.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | January 8, 2008
HANOVER, N.H. -- "The Comeback Kid is always uppermost in my mind," Sen. John McCain said the other day, with a gleam in his eye. "I look forward to that name." Tonight, he just might get it. "We're going to win," the Arizona Republican told a couple of hundred voters yesterday on the snow-covered town square in Keene, N.H., "because [voters] have seen me. They've seen me at 101 town hall meetings. They've seen me, and they've been able to ask the questions." Left for dead beside the presidential campaign highway last spring, McCain has pulled himself back into contention.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 2000
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Former Sen. Bill Bradley, calling his strong, though losing effort in the New Hampshire primary "a re markable turnaround" from his lopsided loss to Vice President Al Gore last week in Iowa, vowed last night that he was "better prepared and eager to continue the fight" for the Democratic presidential nomination. His showing keeps him in the thick of their contest. "We leave New Hampshire and head south and west," he said, asking supporters to remember that "the new politics began here," a reference to his campaign theme calling for an end to old special-interest and negative politics.
TOPIC
By Alec MacGillis | November 12, 2000
WHATEVER the final count in Florida, it will be months before Democrats get over the shock of seeing all that Republican red creeping over the electoral map late Tuesday night. It wasn't a trick of tired, bloodshot eyes: George W. Bush had taken West Virginia and Al Gore's home state of Tennessee, and was perilously close to seizing the Democratic strongholds of Wisconsin, Iowa and Oregon. Everywhere, disbelieving Democrats thought to themselves, "It shouldn't be this close." The candidate who had been primed for the presidency his whole life, with a strong economy at his back, shouldn't be on the verge of losing to a man with five years of on-the-job experience.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jack Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 1996
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- A month ago, only two reporters showed up when Steve Forbes spoke to a Rotary Club luncheon in Portsmouth.This week, Mr. Forbes arrived for a 7:30 a.m. speech at a Rotary Club here and was met by six television crews and more than two dozen reporters from state and national news organizations.The message in this contrast is that Steve Forbes has suddenly become a hot political property, with the New Hampshire primary just a month away.Nor is his new celebrity reflected only in press attention.
TOPIC
By Joseph R.L. Sterne | January 30, 2000
THIRTY-SIX YEARS later, with the clarity of hindsight, it is apparent that the 1964 Republican primary in New Hampshire was one of the last hurrahs of the party's eastern establishment. Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona, otherwise known as Mr. Conservative, went on to win the GOP presidential nomination, suffer overwhelming defeat in November and reorient his party to the West and South for the remainder of the century -- and beyond. But before those momentous events, he had to lose New Hampshire, and lose it painfully.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN REPORTER | January 7, 2008
CONCORD, N.H. -- The traffic-clogging lines that curl into Barack Obama's rallies contain a diverse group, from mothers toting young children to bearded professionals in sturdy all-weather boots. But perhaps most desirable are voters like Lynn Xie, who waited in a quarter-mile-long line last week to hear the Illinois senator speak. "It's really exciting for me," said the Dartmouth College student, boning up for her first presidential election. "I just turned 19." Obama turned the Democratic contest on its ear last week with a decisive victory in the Iowa caucuses, generated in large part by overwhelming support from voters younger than 30. Nearly six in 10 in that age bracket supported Obama - more than five times the number that voted for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN REPORTER | January 7, 2008
CONCORD, N.H. -- The traffic-clogging lines that curl into Barack Obama's rallies contain a diverse group, from mothers toting young children to bearded professionals in sturdy all-weather boots. But perhaps most desirable are voters like Lynn Xie, who waited in a quarter-mile-long line last week to hear the Illinois senator speak. "It's really exciting for me," said the Dartmouth College student, boning up for her first presidential election. "I just turned 19." Obama turned the Democratic contest on its ear last week with a decisive victory in the Iowa caucuses, generated in large part by overwhelming support from voters younger than 30. Nearly six in 10 in that age bracket supported Obama - more than five times the number that voted for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York.
NEWS
By Kristin Jensen and Heidi Przybyla and Kristin Jensen and Heidi Przybyla,Bloomberg News Service | January 6, 2008
The stakes in the U.S. presidential election may be the highest in decades, with danger spots multiplying around the world and economic threats looming at home. The election process - the first in 56 years that doesn't involve an incumbent president or vice president - has moved into high gear after Barack Obama's upset of national front runner Hillary Clinton in the Iowa Democratic caucuses and a similar defeat in Iowa of Republican leader Mitt Romney by Mike Huckabee, a former governor of Arkansas.
NEWS
By JOHN MCCORMICK AND JEFF ZELENY and JOHN MCCORMICK AND JEFF ZELENY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 19, 2006
CHICAGO -- Upending decades of tradition, Democrats are expected to approve today a presidential nominating calendar that will add further importance to states that vote early and will make January 2008 an extremely busy month for politics. Members of the Democratic National Committee are poised to insert the Nevada caucuses between the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary, the traditional starting points on the road to the White House. South Carolina's primary is expected to follow closely behind.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 23, 2006
The Democratic Party intends to add Nevada and South Carolina to the opening chapter of the 2008 presidential campaign, with a key panel deciding yesterday to introduce the voice of Western and Southern voters to the Iowa-New Hampshire duet. At a meeting yesterday in Washington, the rules and bylaws committee of the Democratic National Committee voted to place Nevada between the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary, the two contests that traditionally have launched the race. The group voted to add a South Carolina primary soon after New Hampshire's.
NEWS
January 1, 2006
A commission of Democrats has worked up the nerve to propose that voters in one or two other states make known their presidential preferences before New Hampshire holds its zealously guarded first-in-the-nation primary. The horrified reaction in the Granite State might suggest real reform is afoot in the dysfunctional primary process. But no. The likely result -- doubtless after a knock-down, drag-out battle next spring in the Democratic Central Committee -- would be a subtle change at best.
NEWS
By ART PINE.. and ART PINE..,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2005
Former U.S. Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy, whose surprisingly strong showing in the 1968 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary dramatized deepening public opposition to the Vietnam War and effectively ended President Lyndon B. Johnson's political career, died yesterday. He was 89. Mr. McCarthy, a Democrat who represented Minnesota, died at a retirement home in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C., where he had lived for several years. A relatively obscure senator who turned sour on the war as the United States escalated its troop buildup in the mid-1960s, Mr. McCarthy entered the New Hampshire primary partly to fill a vacuum: More prominent anti-war politicians, assuming that Mr. Johnson was unbeatable, had decided not to run against him. Mr. McCarthy's candidacy was initially dismissed as hopelessly quixotic.
NEWS
By ART PINE.. and ART PINE..,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2005
Former U.S. Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy, whose surprisingly strong showing in the 1968 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary dramatized deepening public opposition to the Vietnam War and effectively ended President Lyndon B. Johnson's political career, died yesterday. He was 89. Mr. McCarthy, a Democrat who represented Minnesota, died at a retirement home in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C., where he had lived for several years. A relatively obscure senator who turned sour on the war as the United States escalated its troop buildup in the mid-1960s, Mr. McCarthy entered the New Hampshire primary partly to fill a vacuum: More prominent anti-war politicians, assuming that Mr. Johnson was unbeatable, had decided not to run against him. Mr. McCarthy's candidacy was initially dismissed as hopelessly quixotic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
CONCORD, N.H. -- The 48 bits of cardboard read like a Who's Who of American presidential politics: John F. Kennedy, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon, Colossus G. Benson.Yes, Colossus G. Benson. And Billy Joe Clegg, Georgiana Doerschuck and Arthur O. Blessitt, all people -- or at least primates -- with one-time presidential ambitions and now stars of New Hampshire Presidential Primary Trading Cards.First printed last year as a civics lesson for the state's fourth-graders, the trading cards have become keepsakes for political junkie types who mainline C-SPAN and know Edmund S. Muskie's middle name (it's Sixtus)
NEWS
By Jill Zuckman and Jill Zuckman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - Eager to amass a voter army for the fall, Sen. John Kerry's presidential campaign will embark this week on an ambitious plan to mobilize voters through a series of national house parties similar to those popularized by former rival Howard Dean. The first wave of house parties is scheduled to take place next Saturday, with Kerry addressing the gatherings in a 6 p.m. conference call, according to the candidate's Web site. "We want to take advantage of the energy out there and get people invested," said Jeanne Shaheen, a former governor of New Hampshire and Kerry's national chairwoman.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.