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Hammond Middle School

NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2000
LIKE MANY school groups, the Bollman Bridge Elementary PTA holds a year-round fund-raising drive, selling frozen foods. To encourage the participation of schoolchildren, a prize is offered to the class that sells the most or meets a challenge to sell a certain amount of items by a certain date. The trick to such selling is to have a great incentive. The Bollman Bridge PTA is lucky that Principal Pamela Butler is such a good sport. Last year, she kissed a pig when the children sold enough pies.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2000
It took a year for a group of seventh-graders to research history, lobby government officials and raise $16,500 to save a 19th-century one-room schoolhouse in Howard County. It's taken 11 years for government officials to fulfill their promise to restore the building. Known as Pfeiffer's Corner School, the building sits in its "temporary" spot on Route 108 outside Clarksville, deteriorating as the gears of bureaucracy slowly turn. The activist pupils from Hammond Middle School are college graduates, some with careers influenced by the project.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Karen Keys and Tanika White and Karen Keys,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2000
Yesterday was the first day of school at all 66 Howard County schools, and all the early risers -- from Hammond High in the east, to Running Brook Elementary in the heart of the district, to Mount View Middle on the county's edge -- fought back their drab-day yawns and vacation hangovers to usher in the new year with enthusiasm. At the high school, 1,300 students swarmed in. There was hootin', hollerin', "Hey-Girl"-n' and high-fivin'. "Saaammm!" screamed freshman Nancy Tewell, delighted to spot Hammond Middle School classmate Samantha Koshgarian, in a crowded hallway.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2000
Dori Tempio's English class at Hammond Middle School has an unusual new classmate. His name is Sullivan and he is very quiet, but not shy. Sully is no ordinary student: Four legs, a tail, a shiny black coat and a red bandanna set him apart from others at the North Laurel school. And Tempio is no ordinary teacher. Born with a neuromuscular disorder, she uses a wheelchair, and Sully has been her service dog in the school since March 21."He's become a big part of our class. He's even quieter than us," said RaadhaRaswant, a sixth-grader in Tempio's class.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2000
BROWNIE TROOPS are required to perform community service work every year. Troop 1345 of Bollman Bridge Elementary in Jessup recently earned a community service badge for its efforts to help three area families. Assistant Principal Kimberlyn Pratesi learned that three local families needed help with groceries and asked the troop to help. Under the organization of Sue Marino, a Brownie mother, the girls gathered two baskets of pantry items and one basket of cleaning supplies. On March 23, they met with Brownie parents Bob Dodson, Betsy Diehl and Clara Hendrick to assemble the goods.
NEWS
By Chrystal Clifford and Chrystal Clifford,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 31, 2000
Hammond Middle School in North Laurel has been named a model "Peace School" because of its sharp reduction in the number of fights and suspensions, state officials announced yesterday. The Maryland Alternative Dispute Resolution Commission, chaired by Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the state Court of Appeals, said the school also was honored for its higher Maryland School Performance Assessment Program scores in every category. "Hammond Middle School's singular achievements illustrate the critical need for peace initiatives in all of our schools," Bell said in a statement.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 1998
IT'S THAT time of year again when young scholars publicly complain -- and secretly rejoice -- about returning to school.The structure of school days, the opportunity to make new friends, learn new things and make mistakes away from the scrutiny of parents frightens and beckons.School lunches may be acceptable to some, although saying so is an unacceptable breach of the unspoken student code.Murray Hill Middle School will begin its second year this month.Returning staff and students are veterans, who will blend with the year's new crop of students.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 1998
MICHELLE GLEDHILL of Hammond Middle School called to report on the achievements of eighth-graders this spring.The eighth-graders decided to make a difference in the community.They've been involved in activities such as food drives. But the students wanted to try something different.They decided to pay for a bassinet for Howard County General Hospital's neonatal unit -- by bowling.Two bowling alleys donated time, footgear and expertise.The 208 members of the eighth grade collected pledges for pins knocked down.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 1998
IT'S BEEN a while since this column reported on the plans and achievements of the Hammond High School community.Finals kept staff and students preoccupied, and much too busy for other activities.Now that finals are over and the winter term begun, Hammond's PTSA is selling entertainment books.You can purchase one in time for Valentine's Day. The books, which cost $35, contain two-for-one coupons to restaurants and events.It's a pleasant gift -- especially when backed by a commitment to one's partner to make good use of the coupons.
NEWS
January 30, 1996
An article in Sunday's Howard County edition incorrectly stated the location of tomorrow's presentation on the county schools' technology magnet program. It will be held at 7 p.m. at Hammond Middle School.The Sun regrets the error.
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