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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
UPDATE: Alas, it's not her. "Not even close," according to spokesman Ryan O'Doherty. Oh well. I'm sure Rawlings-Blake threw down back in the day. Just not in this photo. Take a look at the woman in the turquoise shirt at the bottom left-hand corner of this photo. Is it current Baltimore mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, partying at Hammerjacks in 1997? The resemblance is striking. The photo is dated March 28, 1997 -- less than two months before they tore town the iconic Baltimore club.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Baltimore's liquor board on Thursday revoked the license of a massive Southeast Baltimore dance club, citing incidents in which a patron was shot on the dance floor and the club's owner released pepper spray into a large crowd while riding on a golf cart. The Voltage club, which billed itself as the city's largest, operated out of an old Greyhound bus terminal in the Baltimore Travel Plaza on O'Donnell Street. Voltage, which has been open for about 16 months, ran afoul of police and the liquor board on consecutive weekends in November and into December.
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BUSINESS
By Justin Fenton and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Developers want to bring back Hammerjacks in a new concert and club venue near M&T Bank Stadium and the new Horseshoe casino. They have proposed locating the new Hammerjacks in the 600 block of W. West St. in what is now parking lot "N" for Ravens games. The plans, presented to Pigtown residents at a community meeting Tuesday night, call for a 50,000-square-foot, two-story building with a club and 2,500-person concert space. They also include a parking garage with about 400 spaces, which would be developed by the current owner of the property.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Su | February 22, 2014
The gleaming new Horseshoe Casino Baltimore that greets visitors entering the city on Russell Street rises from gritty surroundings, flanked by a Holiday Inn Express and a concrete bunker-like block of storage units. Those two neighboring properties tell different stories about the possibility of a casino-powered transformation of the gas station-lined corridor, which links the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Interstate 95 with M&T Bank Stadium, Camden Yards and downtown. The hotel owners and others say the $442 million casino will put the Carroll Camden section of South Baltimore on the map and hope it will bring spillover development to the largely industrial area.
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan | March 3, 1993
Brian May of Queen will be at Hammerjacks Friday. The free show will kick off WIYY-FM's 16th anniversary celebration, Don Wehner of Upfront Productions announced yesterday. Mr. May, who has been touring with Guns N' Roses, will play Queen material. His band includes Cozy Powell, Spike Edney, Neil Murray, and Jamie Moss. Doors open at 9 p.m. and the show begins at 10 p.m. Call (410) 659-ROCK for more information.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Hammerjacks, Baltimore's shrine to big hair, loud dresses and heavy metal, is plotting a comeback. An Anne Arundel County man has bought the trademark to sell Hammerjacks-related merchandise. And, he said he's negotiating with developers for a new branded club near the planned Baltimore slots casino off Russell Street. His plans are the second time a revival of the iconic megaclub has been attempted since it closed in 1997; a 2000 reincarnation failed to win over the original's legions of fans, which included, over the years, the likes of Bret Michaels and the classy lady pictured above.  Kevin Butler, a 47-year-old mortgage executive from Anne Arundel County, was a regular at the Howard Street location of Hammerjacks; the club originally opened in 1977 on South Charles Street, but it was the club under an Interstate 395 overpass that became iconic.
NEWS
November 21, 1991
Louis J. Principio Jr., a founder of Hammerjacks, the South Baltimore nightclub and concert hall, died at St. Agnes Hospital Tuesday of cancer. He was 67 and lived on Oakland Terrace Road in Arbutus.A mass of Christian burial for Mr. Principio will be offered at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Roman Catholic Church of the Ascension, Potomac and Poplar avenues in Halethorpe.A native Baltimorean, he became a partner in the business, which now concentrates on concerts in its building at 1101 S. Howard St., when it opened as a tavern on South Charles Street in the late 1970s.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | March 13, 2008
A concert venue and club could open this summer at the former Hammerjacks nightclub, a Baltimore icon of heavy metal and rock that closed nearly two years ago to make way for a development now stalled in the housing slump. The new club, Bourbon Street Live, would occupy both floors of the Hammerjacks building at 316 Guilford Ave. and feature live music, said James J. Temple Jr., an attorney who served for many years as legal counsel to the old nightclub and who is planning to operate the new club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 11, 1992
If you spend a lot of time listening to hard rock, either on the radio or in the concert hall, odds are that you think of Skid Row primarily as a party band. Sure, the band had some success with slow songs like "18 and Life" or "I Remember You," but as anyone who has ever caught their stage show knows, mostly what they do is make a lot of noise and have a lot of fun -- pretty much what you'd expect from a band specializing in songs like "Monkey Business."So if you heard that Skid Row was in town to play a benefit for the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, you might think the story was somebody's idea of a joke.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 12, 1990
Listen to Poison's current single, "Something to Believe In," and you'll hear singer Brett Michaels lament the abundance of social injustice in America today, from homeless people starving in the streets to Vietnam vets dying lonely and forgotten. "If there's a Lord above," he sings, "please give me something to believe in."Sit down and talk with the singer, though, and it quickly becomes obvious that he does have something to believe in -- the fans."Because the fans are always there," says Michaels over the phone from his home in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
By Justin Fenton and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Developers want to bring back Hammerjacks in a new concert and club venue near M&T Bank Stadium and the new Horseshoe casino. They have proposed locating the new Hammerjacks in the 600 block of W. West St. in what is now parking lot "N" for Ravens games. The plans, presented to Pigtown residents at a community meeting Tuesday night, call for a 50,000-square-foot, two-story building with a club and 2,500-person concert space. They also include a parking garage with about 400 spaces, which would be developed by the current owner of the property.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Developers of a revived Hammerjacks laid out their plans for a concert venue near M&T Bank Stadium Tuesday night at a community meeting in Pigtown as they court community support. The new Hammerjacks would be located in the 600 block of W. West St. in what is now parking lot N for Ravens games. The plans call for a 50,000-square-foot, two-story building with a capacity of 2,500 people and a parking garage with 350 spaces, and the developers said it will complement the new Horseshoe casino.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
There are many ways to describe Merriweather Post Pavilion 's M3 Rock Festival - passionate, sweaty, loud, over-the-top, sartorially questionable. Sometimes, it's even romantic. Just ask the Australian couple that got engaged while in attendance and returned the following year as part of the honeymoon. "We did a toast from the stage with a couple of the artists," said Brad Canfield, the festival's producer and general manager of Merriweather Post Pavilion . Now in its fifth year, the M3 Festival (which stands for May Merriweather Metal)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Hammerjacks, Baltimore's shrine to big hair, loud dresses and heavy metal, is plotting a comeback. An Anne Arundel County man has bought the trademark to sell Hammerjacks-related merchandise. And, he said he's negotiating with developers for a new branded club near the planned Baltimore slots casino off Russell Street. His plans are the second time a revival of the iconic megaclub has been attempted since it closed in 1997; a 2000 reincarnation failed to win over the original's legions of fans, which included, over the years, the likes of Bret Michaels and the classy lady pictured above.  Kevin Butler, a 47-year-old mortgage executive from Anne Arundel County, was a regular at the Howard Street location of Hammerjacks; the club originally opened in 1977 on South Charles Street, but it was the club under an Interstate 395 overpass that became iconic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
UPDATE: Alas, it's not her. "Not even close," according to spokesman Ryan O'Doherty. Oh well. I'm sure Rawlings-Blake threw down back in the day. Just not in this photo. Take a look at the woman in the turquoise shirt at the bottom left-hand corner of this photo. Is it current Baltimore mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, partying at Hammerjacks in 1997? The resemblance is striking. The photo is dated March 28, 1997 -- less than two months before they tore town the iconic Baltimore club.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Baltimore police have identified one of the victims of the multiple stabbings that occurred early Saturday inside the downtown nightclub Bourbon Street. Charles Johnson , 24, died of his injuries. The three other victims were transported to local hospitals and are expected to survive, according to spokesman Detective Jeremy Silbert. Police responded at 1 a.m. to Bourbon Street, on the 300 block of Guilford Avenue, to find four men stabbed inside the club, Silbert said. A couple of events were scheduled Friday night at the club.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 10, 2000
For many Baltimoreans, the name Hammerjacks evokes the big-hair, hard rockin' '80s, a time of spandex and torn jeans, mascara and mousse, black leather and pink lace. Hammerjacks was home to glam bands and hard-rock honeys, where Guns N' Roses made its local debut and Bret Michaels of Poison went to hang. It was the place to see Kix, Ratt, Skid Row or Extreme. Well, get over it, Baltimore. The new Hammerjacks is a different experience altogether. "Hammerjacks 1980 was then, and Hammerjacks 2000 is now," says Louie Principio, owner of the new club, which celebrates its grand opening tonight.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | March 13, 2008
A concert venue and club could open this summer at the former Hammerjacks nightclub, a Baltimore icon of heavy metal and rock that closed nearly two years ago to make way for a development now stalled in the housing slump. The new club, Bourbon Street Live, would occupy both floors of the Hammerjacks building at 316 Guilford Ave. and feature live music, said James J. Temple Jr., an attorney who served for many years as legal counsel to the old nightclub and who is planning to operate the new club.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | January 2, 2007
A development plan that includes a tower to rival the city's tallest skyscrapers could mean the demolition of yet another vestige of downtown's historic architecture. Setting up what would be downtown Baltimore's third preservation face-off in less than a year, a Washington-area development team is in early talks with the city about building a mixed-use project near the end of the Jones Falls Expressway, including a tower that could rise as high as 60 stories. To make that happen, the developers would need to raze the Terminal Warehouse, an unimposing brick edifice that has stood on the Guilford Avenue site since 1894 - and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1975.
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