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By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | June 30, 2007
Following advice from the city's attorney, Mayor Sheila Dixon said yesterday that she was convinced that Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm followed the "intent and letter of the law" when he requested an early pension for his former top deputy, who left in January for a state job. But the mayor ordered that all city agencies comply with new guidelines crafted by City Solicitor George A. Nilson on handling early-pension requests that include consulting with...
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 27, 2007
Baltimore police Commissioner Leonard Hamm is dying in increments. "When the pager goes off and I look at the location of [a homicide]," Hamm said yesterday, "I know [the victims] are black men and I know the perps are black men. A little bit of me dies each time it happens - as a black man, as a father, as an uncle and also as a police commissioner." Death was the topic yesterday when I spoke with Hamm at police headquarters. At the time we met, Baltimore's homicide count was 152 compared with 133 at the same time last year.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Doug Donovan and Gus G. Sentementes and Doug Donovan,SUN REPORTERS | June 26, 2007
For two years Marcus L. Brown quietly served as the steady hand in a Baltimore Police Department whose top job had been beset by political turmoil and turnover. Through it all, the former deputy commissioner worked behind the scenes to execute then-Mayor Martin O'Malley's policing policies while largely avoiding the distracting scrutiny leveled against police commissioners. Until now. When O'Malley took over as governor in January, he picked Brown to lead the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, at a salary of $127,500.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | June 22, 2007
City Councilman and mayoral candidate Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. called yesterday for the resignation of Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm, stepping up the political battle over what has become the defining theme in this year's city elections. The call for Hamm's resignation came after a night marked by yet another homicide - this time in Better Waverly - pushing Baltimore steadily toward 300 killings, a total not reached in almost a decade. Mitchell, a mayoral candidate, made his announcement after a private meeting with the police commissioner, and he refused to offer any specific criticisms of Hamm.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
With the city on pace to record nearly 300 homicides this year, Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon and Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm announced plans yesterday to have area police agencies help with traffic patrols in the city. "You're going to see in Baltimore City different uniforms enforcing the city," Hamm said. "In the past, the Baltimore Police Department was different. We thought we were the end all and be all of law enforcement. Now we're allowing our friends to help us out. Instead of driving by and saying, `That's the city's problem,' they're going to address it."
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Greg Garland and Jamie Stiehm and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTERS | May 21, 2007
Jonathan Victor Hamm had told family members he enlisted in the Army to steer away from the streets of West Baltimore, where he was raised. Last week, the private first class died in Baghdad at the age of 20 - killed by what the Defense Department described as "indirect enemy fire." A young man who had struggled in school, kept to himself and initially failed an Army test in seeking to enlist, Private Hamm tried again and succeeded a few months before his 18th birthday, relatives in Baltimore said yesterday.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,sun reporter | May 20, 2007
An infantryman from Baltimore was killed in Iraq on Thursday -- just a month after he was deployed to the country, the Defense Department announced yesterday. Pfc. Jonathan V. Hamm, 20, was at a forward base in Baghdad when he was struck by "indirect enemy fire," according to the department. The soldier is not related to Baltimore Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm, a department spokesman said. Joseph Piek, an Army spokesman at Fort Lewis, Wash., said he was likely hit by mortar fire or an artillery round.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 2, 2007
My first inkling that Mayor Sheila Dixon had a different crime strategy than her immediate predecessor came when I saw the foot patrolmen on Garrison Avenue, between Beaufort and Elmer avenues. Before Dixon addressed reporters at a news conference Monday, I talked briefly with Baltimore Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm about foot patrolmen, at long last, coming to that part of Garrison Avenue. "The neighborhood knucklehead contingent seems to be absent," I told Hamm.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2007
After a deadly weekend with six city homicides, Mayor Sheila Dixon outlined yesterday her long-awaited crime-fighting strategy, which includes targeting the most dangerous offenders, cracking down on illegal guns and strengthening community partnerships. Many of the proposals expand on existing initiatives, such as the city's safe zones, and resurrect old crime-fighting strategies, such as zeroing in on Baltimore's most violent offenders - an approach heralded by noted criminologist David Kennedy, who worked with the city in the late 1990s and was consulted on the current plan.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | April 19, 2007
The Board of Estimates approved yesterday a 5.9 percent pay raise for Baltimore Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm, increasing his salary to $162,000 a year. Hamm was named acting police commissioner in November 2004, after Mayor Martin O'Malley fired Kevin P. Clark. Hamm's salary was set at $153,000 a year and had remained unchanged until now. "Mayor Dixon has faith and confidence in Commissioner Hamm," said Anthony McCarthy, a spokesman for the mayor. "She demands a lot from him; he's responsive to her."
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