Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHamid Karzai
IN THE NEWS

Hamid Karzai

NEWS
March 7, 2012
Some day, we expect to see restaurants in Baltimore representing each of the 193 United Nations members. Till then, but here's a sampling of more dining destinations to explore. Afghan: The Helmand is so authentic, it's owned by Afghan President Hamid Karzai's brother, Qayum Karzai. 806 N. Charles St., Mount Vernon. helmand.com Australian: Corner BYOB Cafe isn't ethnic. But it does sometimes offer kangaroo meat. That counts, right? 850 W. 36th St., Hampden. cornerbyob.com Eastern European: Ze Mean Bean Cafe serves traditional dishes and light fare.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - Twenty-one people, including two senior Defense Ministry commanders, were killed in heavy factional fighting overnight in the western province of Herat, in another upset for Afghanistan as it prepares for elections, Afghan officials said yesterday. In what appeared to be coordinated attacks, forces from three neighboring provinces moved on districts in Herat Province, the fief of the powerful warlord Ismail Khan. Fighting involving artillery and tanks was continuing south of the city of Herat, around Shindand yesterday afternoon, said Mohammadullah Afzali, the Foreign Ministry representative in Herat.
NEWS
By M. Karim Faiez and Laura King and M. Karim Faiez and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan's last king, Mohammed Zahir Shah, died yesterday, plunging his battered country into mourning and inspiring a wave of wistful nostalgia for better days. He was 92. Zahir Shah, an ineffectual yet beloved monarch, spent nearly three decades in genteel exile after being ousted in a palace coup in 1973. He returned to Afghanistan in 2002 after the fall of the Taliban, and although he played no significant political role, he served for many as an emblem of the country's yet-unrealized hopes for rebuilding.
NEWS
March 20, 2013
From media accounts, the war in Afghanistan has hit a disturbing snag which was precipitated by President Hamid Karzai's recent remarks following the U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's visit, when he accused the Taliban terrorists and America of being in cahoots with each other ("Hagel's shaky Afghan debut," March 12). This should solidify President Barack Obama's plans to withdraw our troops from this area by the end of 2014, and I would suggest even sooner after hearing Mr. Karzai's stinging remarks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - President Hamid Karzai removed Mohammad Arif Sarwari, head of the National Security Directorate, the Afghan intelligence service, yesterday in a move that many took as a sign of Karzai's growing confidence. The dismissal, announced by the official Bakhtar news agency, came amid a flurry of new appointments in the past week, including four new provincial governors and many new regional police chiefs. The appointments, coming soon after the approval of a new constitution, are part of a drive to improve efficiency and governance, aides to the president said, as well as an indication of Karzai's increasing influence.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
The Obama administration's policies toward Afghanistan are emblematic of its monumental incompetence in foreign affairs ("Pulling the plug on Karzai," July 10). As wrongheaded and harmful as its domestic policies are, at least on the domestic side, the administration knows where it wants to go. In foreign affairs, its ignorance, naivete and indecision have resulted in the loss of one of our strongest allies in the Middle East (Egypt), the death of our ambassador in Benghazi, a total misreading of the "Arab Spring," vacillation in Africa and now the consideration of a path in Afghanistan that would essentially gut any headway that has been made at the cost of thousands of American lives.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 2003
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Deputy Secretary of State Richard L. Armitage made a short stop in Afghanistan yesterday on his way between Pakistan and India, to bear a personal message from the White House that the United States would not forget Afghanistan. "President Bush has asked me to come to Afghanistan to dramatically make the point that the United States, although we may at present be occupied by Iraq, is not going to forget our responsibilities in Afghanistan," Armitage said at a brief news conference yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 2003
KABUL, Afghanistan - Suspected Taliban fighters killed at least seven people and wounded two in a bold attack early yesterday on a government district office in the southern Afghan province of Zabul, local security officials said. An American soldier was wounded in a separate attack yesterday when gunmen opened fire on a Special Forces unit training the Afghan National Army on a firing range on the edge of Kabul, the capital. NATO peacekeepers in Kabul captured a man suspected of being one of the three gunmen, said a spokesman for the U.S. military at Bagram Air Base.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 23, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- NATO forces said yesterday that they were investigating reports that 25 Afghan civilians were killed in overnight airstrikes in southern Afghanistan. The mounting civilian casualty toll in Afghanistan is eroding public support for the Western-backed government of President Hamid Karzai. After the report of the latest deaths, Karzai told the BBC that accidental killings and injuries of civilians at the hands of coalition forces are "difficult for us to accept or understand."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2008
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A suicide bomber and gunmen attacked a drug-eradication team in eastern Afghanistan yesterday, killing at least 19 people and injuring more than 40, authorities said. Twelve police officers were among the dead in the assault, the latest in a string of attacks by militants against government teams responsible for destroying the lucrative opium poppy crop during the planting season. The insurgency is fueled with profits from the drug trade. The seven other people killed were civilians, the Interior Ministry said in a statement.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.