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Hamid Karzai

NEWS
March 23, 2006
An Afghan named Abdul Rahman, who converted to Christianity in the early 1990s, is now on trial for apostasy and faces the death penalty. His estranged family brought the lawsuit that put him in jeopardy. The courts in Afghanistan are controlled by extremely conservative Islamic judges, and though there is international pressure on President Hamid Karzai to intervene, it would be at great political cost, and he has declined to get involved. Mr. Rahman was told by the judge hearing his case that if he reconverts back to Islam, he will be let go. He says he would just as soon die for his faith; wary prosecutors are now exploring the idea that he is insane.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 27, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Afghan President Hamid Karzai and President Pervez Musharraf of Pakistan signaled an improvement in relations between their two countries after an unusually cordial meeting here yesterday and called for greater cooperation in fighting terrorism. Karzai was on a two-day visit to the Pakistani capital, where he would also meet with the opposition politician Benazir Bhutto, a statement from the Afghan president's office said. Bhutto is contesting parliamentary elections scheduled for January.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | November 3, 2009
KABUL, Afghanistan - - Electoral officials Monday canceled Saturday's planned Afghan presidential runoff and declared incumbent Hamid Karzai the victor. The decision, announced by the government-appointed Independent Electoral Commission, ended more than two months of uncertainty stemming from an election that was marred by fraud. The U.S. and the United Nations quickly lined up in support of Karzai, who is to serve another five-year term. "We congratulate President Karzai on his victory in this historic election and look forward to working with him," the U.S. Embassy said in statement.
NEWS
January 20, 2010
Endemic corruption in Afghanistan amounts to a virtual tax on poverty-stricken Afghans, robbing them of the equivalent of a quarter of the war-racked nation's annual gross domestic product, a new U.N. report states. The report, released Tuesday by the United Nations' Office on Drugs and Crime, found that nearly 60 percent of Afghans regarded corruption as their biggest worry, outpacing concerns about the insurgency or joblessness. As President Hamid Karzai's government prepares for an international aid conference in London on Jan. 28, it likely will face tough questions about measures under way to battle corruption.
NEWS
April 7, 2010
Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai's accusation that western interests were responsible for the massive voter fraud that occurred in the last presidential election should give us cause to re-evaluate our relationship with that country. If Mr. Karzai's claim is true, then what legitimate role is the U.S. playing there? If it is false, then it's obvious we do not have a reliable partner for what we are doing there. So far no U.S. officials have addressed the real bogeyman in Afghanistan, the drug trade that feeds the Karzai government's corruption.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - President Hamid Karzai removed Mohammad Arif Sarwari, head of the National Security Directorate, the Afghan intelligence service, yesterday in a move that many took as a sign of Karzai's growing confidence. The dismissal, announced by the official Bakhtar news agency, came amid a flurry of new appointments in the past week, including four new provincial governors and many new regional police chiefs. The appointments, coming soon after the approval of a new constitution, are part of a drive to improve efficiency and governance, aides to the president said, as well as an indication of Karzai's increasing influence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 4, 2011
It's been one week since the U.S. House of Representatives nearly voted to end the war in Afghanistan. In that time, the U.S. has apologized for a NATO air strike that killed 14 women and children , and Afghan president Hamid Karzai has issued a "last warning" for the U.S. to stop bombing houses.  "If after the Afghan government said the aerial bombing of Afghan houses is banned and if it continues, then their presence will change from...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan's foreign minister, Rangin Dadfar Spanta, lost a no-confidence vote in parliament yesterday after he was unable to stop the expulsion of tens of thousands of Afghan refugees and illegal workers from Iran in the past three weeks. Spanta was blamed for failing to find a diplomatic solution with Iran that would have prevented the expulsions. He won only 73 votes, while 141 legislators voted against him. Iran has expelled thousands of Afghans before. But the number it expelled this time, more than 50,000, was high for such a short period.
NEWS
June 2, 2012
The more I read about Afghanistan, the more concerned I become about the contending factions faced by President Hamid Karzai's government and the American forces trying to support it. We have spent $471 million to complete the Afghanistan Dam project, begun in the early 1950s to provide electricity, and the $6 billion we have spent over the past decade to combat the opium trade has helped finance the insurgency and fueled government corruption....
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Some day, we expect to see restaurants in Baltimore representing each of the 193 United Nations members. Till then, but here's a sampling of more dining destinations to explore. Afghan: The Helmand is so authentic, it's owned by Afghan President Hamid Karzai's brother, Qayum Karzai. 806 N. Charles St., Mount Vernon. helmand.com Australian: Corner BYOB Cafe isn't ethnic. But it does sometimes offer kangaroo meat. That counts, right? 850 W. 36th St., Hampden. cornerbyob.com Eastern European: Ze Mean Bean Cafe serves traditional dishes and light fare.
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