Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHamburger
IN THE NEWS

Hamburger

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 18, 2005
On Wednesday, August 17, 2005, JOSEPH HAMBURGER; loving husband of Hermien Hamburger (nee Gomperts); beloved father of Coos Hamburger of Reisterstown, MD; devoted father-in-law of Sharon Goldsmith-Hamburger; loving grandfather of David and Yael Hamburger. Services at Sol Levinson and Bros., Inc., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Friday, August 19 at 10 A.M. Interment at Beth Tfiloh Congregation - Windsor Mill Road. Please omit flowers, contributions in his memory may be directed to the American Heart Association, 415 N. Charles Street (21201)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Bobby Flay has a theory about Father's Day: "All guys think they can grill," he said. "They're going to take the reins whether they have the skills or not. " But don't worry. Flay's not going to pass judgment on your burger — he'll even give you some tips. But when it comes to the hamburger he sells in his own restaurants, Flay isn't so forgiving. And it makes no difference whether it's prepared for guests at Bar Americain, his pricey Manhattan restaurant, or at one of his casual Bobby Burger Palace operations, he says.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 30, 2003
On November 28, 2003, CHARLESHAMBURGER; beloved husband of Jane Hamburger (nee Wetzler); beloved father of Carol Bernstein, of Owings Mills, MD and Anne Hamburger Jenney, of Los Angeles, CA; devoted father-in-law of Frank Bernstein and Rafe Jenney; loving grandfather of Susan Smith, Beth Trout, Hannah and Owen Jenney; loving great-grandfather of Ally and Connor Smith and Juliet Trout. Services at SOL LEVINSON AND BROS, INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mount Wilson Lane, on Sunday, November 30, at 10 A.M. Interment Har Sinai Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Remember the hamburger? I'm talking a plain old hamburger, the kind that says nothing about its local sourcing, its prime ingredients or its house-made toppings. This is not the kind of hamburger that could headline its own boutique or draw the attention of food and travel shows. And not a fast-food fantasy burger either but just a hamburger. Think of it as a baseline hamburger. I found such a hamburger, right across the street from the Baltimore Sun offices, at Kim's Deli Express , which is kind of like the de facto staff lunchroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
It's national hamburger month. Just trust me. I guess I better have a hamburger every day and blog about it. Ya with me? Let's get started. Have a look at this photo gallery from a few months back. Not all of them are hamburgers. Some of them are other kinds of burgers, made out of things like turkey, kangaroo and even vegetables. But a few of them are legitimately hamburgers.    
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | February 10, 1994
Ferdinand Hamburger Jr., a retired professor and chairman of the department of electrical engineering at Johns Hopkins University who established the university's archives that later were named for him, died Monday of Parkinson's disease at Church Home where he had been a resident since 1987.Dr. Hamburger, who was 89, joined the faculty in 1931 and focused his research on radio transmission and reception. He also taught courses in the theory of radio, electron tubes, electricity and magnetism.
NEWS
April 1, 1994
The latest Denny's incident doesn't involve racism so much as some of the most dubious customer relations ever documented. The customer is always right, yes? Not in the case of Sheryl Neal and Cashmere Hardy, who refused to pay a $7.09 bill after what they say was a disgusting food experience and were carted off to jail as a result.Ms. Neal alleges that on July 3, 1992, she found a long hair in her waffles at the Denny's restaurant in Severn and sent them back. Something like this has happened before in thousands of establishments.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 10, 1992
Even if you never shopped there, you probably got one of its ties or shirts as a gift.To the end, the store remains solid, uncomplicated, never a discount arena. Over the years, it has possessed an old-fashioned Baltimore respectability. The place traded on the quality of its wares and never worried too much about high fashion and design.If Hamburger's styles were a couple of years behind other designers, nobody fretted much.Bob Pullen, a suit salesman at the flagship store at Charles and Fayette streets, came to work for the firm in 1951.
NEWS
November 30, 2003
Charles Hamburger, owner and founder of the former Charles Men's Shops, died Friday of natural causes at North Oaks Retirement Community in Pikesville, where he resided for the past three years. The former Baltimore resident was 88. Mr. Hamburger was born and raised in Baltimore, and attended the University of Maryland. In 1940, he opened the Charles Men's Shop in Pimlico, and later opened a second store on Erdman Avenue. He ran both businesses until 1980, when he suffered a stroke. Throughout his four decades in the men's clothing industry, family members said, Mr. Hamburger prided himself in treating his customers with respect - working by the motto: "the customer is always right."
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | March 24, 1999
Item: Oscar Mayer Lunchables All Star Burgers and Hot Dogs kits What you get: One lunch Cost: About $2.50 Preparation time: Just open and eat Review: Burgers and hot dogs are the newest offerings in these refrigerated lunch kits. Each box includes chips or a beverage, with candy for dessert. Their success depends on whether your child is willing to eat a cold hamburger or hot dog. The package specifically says, "no need to heat." Our 5-year-old friend, Emily, said the cold burger -- while fun to put together by herself -- "did not taste real good."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
It's national hamburger month. Just trust me. I guess I better have a hamburger every day and blog about it. Ya with me? Let's get started. Have a look at this photo gallery from a few months back. Not all of them are hamburgers. Some of them are other kinds of burgers, made out of things like turkey, kangaroo and even vegetables. But a few of them are legitimately hamburgers.    
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 24, 2011
Since it opened last week, marking the comeback of a regional fast-food chain associated with the golden days of the Baltimore Colts, the new Gino's in Towson has been drawing long lines of customers who crave nostalgia with an order of fries. As of Tuesday at noon, the wait to get in the door was 25 minutes, the wait to order another five minutes, and the wait for your food - delivered to your table - another 25. So that's pushing an hour for a hamburger and fries. Some people give up and walk to the nearby Applebee's for lunch, figuring they'll return for a Gino's Giant after all the initial excitement dies down.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
So many taverns/sports bars serve the same popular menu within the same quality range — from palatable in a pinch to decent comfort food — that you can describe the kitchen as "good enough" and go on to the other attractions. Drink specials and big-screen TVs draw the target clientele. If the chow is presentable and familiar, that's enough. Frank & Nic's West End Grille serves wings and all the popular tavern fare. But it isn't your typical sports bar. Billed as a "casual restaurant and sports bar" and located more or less in the shadow of Camden Yards on Pratt and Paca streets, the vibe suggests it intends to take the flip-flops out of casual and the excess out of sports bar. Not only could you take your mom here, you could take a client.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 8, 2010
Sidney "Sid" Mandell, the gregarious former owner of a large, New York-style Woodmoor kosher delicatessen that for decades served up juicy, hot pastrami and corned beef sandwiches and was known for its famous "Mandell's Four by Four," died Tuesday in his sleep at his son's Stevenson home. He was 93. Mr. Mandell, the son of immigrant parents from Austria and Russia, was raised on Bond Street in East Baltimore. "They were difficult times and the family, as most immigrants, lived in cramped quarters with bare necessities," said his son, Steve Mandell.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2009
Orlando Brown insists he's a cream puff - on the inside, that is. The former Baltimore Ravens' offensive tackle said he "just looks scary" at 6 foot 7 and 350 pounds, but he's really "a gentle giant with a soft heart like my mother's." That compassion has already come into play at Fatburger, the new restaurant in Gateway Overlook Shopping Center where Brown is owner and frequent fry cook. Since opening the first Maryland location for the Los Angeles-based franchise in January, he devoted many hours trying to reprogram a chronically late employee before finally firing him. "I know what it's like to have someone take you under their wing and give you a second chance," said Brown, who alternated playing for Baltimore and the Cleveland Browns during a 14-year NFL career that ended in 2006.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 12, 2008
Former Baltimore Ravens offensive tackle Orlando Brown will open Maryland's first Fatburger hamburger joint in August at a franchise location in Columbia. The new restaurant, in the Columbia Gateway shopping center, will be one of five that Brown plans to open in Maryland. His franchise expects to open five additional Fatburgers around Washington, with a first location planned near Howard University, executives with the Santa Monica, Calif.-based chain said. A planned College Park location, originally to be the first Maryland location, has been delayed.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1998
Pauline "Paula" Elizabeth Hamburger, a longtime champion for mental health and aid to the poor, died of cancer Jan. 17 at her Baltimore home. She was 89.Trained as a social worker, Mrs. Hamburger helped found Johns Hopkins Hospital's Community Psychiatry Mental Health Program in 1969. Through it, she advocated providing better health and education services to children, especially those in the impoverished neighborhoods around the city hospital."She championed the cause of children and their need for mental health services," said Dr. William Breakey, a psychiatrist at Hopkins.
NEWS
July 13, 2003
Edward Howard Schultz, a manager for the old Hamburger's menswear shops who later brought the pleasures of pit beef to his Pennsylvania community, died July 6 at a Mechanicsburg rehabilitation center of complications after open-heart surgery. He was 61 and had lived in Lancaster since 1971. Mr. Schultz was born in Baltimore and graduated from Parkville High School, then served for two years in the Army. He worked briefly in a shoe store before joining Hamburger's in 1966. He was a salesman at the company's Reisterstown and Charles Center stores, and a manager at the Harundale and Eastpoint stores until 1971.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | February 14, 2008
Albert Berney, a retired president the old Hamburger's men's clothing store who served on numerous civic boards, died of respiratory disease Tuesday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The North Baltimore resident was 88. Born in Baltimore and raised in Reservoir Hill in the Esplanade apartments, he attended Park School and was a 1936 Polytechnic Institute graduate. He earned a degree in accounting at Antioch College in Ohio and was a lieutenant in the Navy in the South Pacific during World War II. In 1949, he became controller of the business founded by his great-grandfather Isaac Hamburger in 1850.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2008
Wendy's International Inc. Shares climbed 42 cents, closing at $23.57. Billionaire investor Nelson Peltz, who offered to buy Wendy's in November, plans to nominate six directors to the hamburger chain's board.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.