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By N.Y. Times News Service | August 7, 1991
NEW YORK -- Halston, a designer whose personal life attracted as much attention as his fashions, will be examined from both sides this fall. "Simply Halston," a biography by Steven Gaines, is scheduled for publication in September.Advance copies of the book, which is an account of stormy business and personal relationships, drug use in the heyday of Studio 54 and a successful battle with cancer years before he contracted AIDS, have been sent out by the publisher, Putnam's. Halston died in March 1990.
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NEWS
By Booth Moore and Booth Moore,Special to the Sun | January 26, 2003
Most people who recognize the name Bradley Bayou probably know him for his daytime TV persona: He's a regular guest on the estrogen-fueled kaffeeklatsch known as The View on ABC. On Lifetime, he rescues the aesthetically challenged in a show called Operation Style. But he is also a fashion designer, and recently he was named creative director for the American fashion house Halston, which might be just the thing the long-suffering brand needs. Then again, it might be yet another futile attempt to rescue Halston from licensing obscurity.
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FEATURES
October 30, 1991
NEW YORK - A fascinating view of an American fashion legend, "Halston: Absolute Modernism," went on exhibit Tuesday the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City.The show has been mounted to suggest that Halston, who died last year, was an enormously clever, deceptively simple designer. There are 105 outfits: fluid jersey dresses, ankle-length cashmere sets, swimsuit-back jump suits and slinky evening numbers. They are simplicity itself.But on the walls, the patterns for the dresses elaborate, origami-like shapes have been framed like abstract paintings.
NEWS
By Holly Hanson and By Holly Hanson,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- It should have been the best moment of Kevan Hall's life.Instead, when he was named to the top design post at Halston last year, the response from fashion's elite was uniform and pointed: Who's he?Never mind that Hall had survived 20 years in the fickle fashion industry, heading his own Los Angeles company for 11 years and working as a free-lance designer for many others. He had dressed celebrities, done movie costumes, received a Great American Designer award from the NAACP and created a dress for Absolut Vodka's long-running series of ads.But he was virtually unknown, especially on New York's insular Seventh Avenue.
NEWS
By Booth Moore and Booth Moore,Special to the Sun | January 26, 2003
Most people who recognize the name Bradley Bayou probably know him for his daytime TV persona: He's a regular guest on the estrogen-fueled kaffeeklatsch known as The View on ABC. On Lifetime, he rescues the aesthetically challenged in a show called Operation Style. But he is also a fashion designer, and recently he was named creative director for the American fashion house Halston, which might be just the thing the long-suffering brand needs. Then again, it might be yet another futile attempt to rescue Halston from licensing obscurity.
NEWS
By Holly Hanson and By Holly Hanson,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- It should have been the best moment of Kevan Hall's life.Instead, when he was named to the top design post at Halston last year, the response from fashion's elite was uniform and pointed: Who's he?Never mind that Hall had survived 20 years in the fickle fashion industry, heading his own Los Angeles company for 11 years and working as a free-lance designer for many others. He had dressed celebrities, done movie costumes, received a Great American Designer award from the NAACP and created a dress for Absolut Vodka's long-running series of ads.But he was virtually unknown, especially on New York's insular Seventh Avenue.
FEATURES
By Chicago TribuneEdited by Catherine Cook | November 7, 1991
A new face on fashionBlue jeans at Octavia? Satin bomber jackets? What is the world coming to?Fans of the elegant separates and party dresses for which thCross Keys boutique has been known, need not panic. The store, founded in 1965, has not abandoned its classic customer, but merely reached out to include those with a younger spirit as well. Hence, you'll now see here quilted metallic miniskirts, funky big shirts with miniature football buttons, and designer denim pieces.The changes began gradually about a year and a half ago when Octavia Dugan's 27-year-old grandson, Hammond Jay Dugan IV, took over the business reins.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 9, 1995
Stand up tall, put hands on hips and press. Fashion says that what you feel will be the focus of excitement next spring. If you pressed more flesh than hipbone, there is time to diet down. Designers who showed next season's collections in New York last week have their money riding on the hip and it is a liberating thought.There wasn't a tight waistband or corset to be seen as pants and skirts dropped to the hipbone or below, hanging gently on that curve much the way a skirt slips easily with the loss of some extra pounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2009
Raphael Langford has always been known as one of the most elegant figures on Baltimore's social scene. Even getting sidelined by a serious illness last year didn't knock the 64-year-old Mount Vernon resident off his "classic" style track, as evidenced by his air of sleek sophistication at a recent party at Baltimore's Ritz-Carlton. The semiretired chief operating officer of Unibec Inc. says he learned years ago, while working for fashion designer Halston, the importance of always looking good.
FEATURES
By Christopher Andersen and Christopher Andersen,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 13, 1993
For months Donald Cammell, an expatriate American painter, an accomplished womanizer in his own right, had been pestered by one young female acquaintance who wanted desperately to meet his famous friend. He finally relented, escorting her to the Olympia concert and to the party af- terward. As soon as Mick Jagger entered the room, Cammell cornered him."Mick, this is Bianca," he said, noticing for the first time thstriking resemblance between them. "You two are going to have a great romance," Cammell declared.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 9, 1995
Stand up tall, put hands on hips and press. Fashion says that what you feel will be the focus of excitement next spring. If you pressed more flesh than hipbone, there is time to diet down. Designers who showed next season's collections in New York last week have their money riding on the hip and it is a liberating thought.There wasn't a tight waistband or corset to be seen as pants and skirts dropped to the hipbone or below, hanging gently on that curve much the way a skirt slips easily with the loss of some extra pounds.
FEATURES
By Chicago TribuneEdited by Catherine Cook | November 7, 1991
A new face on fashionBlue jeans at Octavia? Satin bomber jackets? What is the world coming to?Fans of the elegant separates and party dresses for which thCross Keys boutique has been known, need not panic. The store, founded in 1965, has not abandoned its classic customer, but merely reached out to include those with a younger spirit as well. Hence, you'll now see here quilted metallic miniskirts, funky big shirts with miniature football buttons, and designer denim pieces.The changes began gradually about a year and a half ago when Octavia Dugan's 27-year-old grandson, Hammond Jay Dugan IV, took over the business reins.
FEATURES
October 30, 1991
NEW YORK - A fascinating view of an American fashion legend, "Halston: Absolute Modernism," went on exhibit Tuesday the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City.The show has been mounted to suggest that Halston, who died last year, was an enormously clever, deceptively simple designer. There are 105 outfits: fluid jersey dresses, ankle-length cashmere sets, swimsuit-back jump suits and slinky evening numbers. They are simplicity itself.But on the walls, the patterns for the dresses elaborate, origami-like shapes have been framed like abstract paintings.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | August 7, 1991
NEW YORK -- Halston, a designer whose personal life attracted as much attention as his fashions, will be examined from both sides this fall. "Simply Halston," a biography by Steven Gaines, is scheduled for publication in September.Advance copies of the book, which is an account of stormy business and personal relationships, drug use in the heyday of Studio 54 and a successful battle with cancer years before he contracted AIDS, have been sent out by the publisher, Putnam's. Halston died in March 1990.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | January 28, 2007
The red zone You'll be seeing red at the Textile Museum in Washington. The new exhibit Red, on display Friday-July 8, will blanket the museum with red textiles and photographs and will showcase the many uses and meanings of the bold color in clothing and fabrics around the globe and throughout the ages. Textiles on view come from the museum's collection of about 17,000 items and include a 6th-century Egyptian fragment, a 19th-century Navajo rug, a 1970s Halston ball gown, the current self-portrait tapestry Tommy USA by Thomas Cronenberg (shown at right)
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | August 28, 1991
J. Schoeneman Inc., the local clothing manufacturer best known for its private labels carried by Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus, has been sold to its managers and a foreign investment group.Plaid Holdings Corp. and senior managers of Schoeneman announced yesterday Bidermann Industries Corp. had agreed to sell its subsidiary.Schoeneman was was part of Bidermann's acquisition last year of Cluett, Peabody & Co. The New York-based Bidermann is also a manufacturer of men's and women's designer clothing.
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