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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
With little more than an hour remaining before the deadline to accomplish one of their top priorities, the Ravens on Tuesday reached agreement on a five-year, $61 million deal with Haloti Ngata, ensuring that one of the game's most dominant interior linemen will be a fixture on their defense for the foreseeable future. Ngata's deal runs through 2015 and includes $40 million over the first two years that is essentially guaranteed. The pact makes Ngata one of the highest-paid defensive linemen in the NFL and shares some similarities with the five-year, $68 million ($40 million guaranteed)
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
If you're among the Ravens fans discouraged by the inconsistent play of Lee Evans and Domonique Foxworth , you have company in head coach John Harbaugh . Harbaugh said Monday that it's clear the lingering injuries to Evans and Foxworth are affecting their ability to make plays, and the Ravens are going to have to make a difficult decision about whether it would be better to shut them down until their healthy rather than continue to...
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By Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
General manager Ozzie Newsome said talks on a long-term deal with defensive tackle Haloti Ngata will begin in three or four days. "The Ravens have had talks with the representatives for Haloti Ngata, and as soon as the dust of training camp settles, we will begin talks on a contract extension," Newsome said Friday. If the Ravens can strike a deal with Ngata, they would create cap room to fill other needs on the team. Ngata, who currently accounts for 10 percent of the Ravens' cap, isn't concerned about the situation.
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By Mike Preston | June 23, 2011
When the NFL owners' lockout was first announced, there was fear that some of the league's biggest players would get bigger, because they wouldn't have the discipline to remain fit without the various mini-camps. But the Ravens' Haloti Ngata has shrunk. The giant defensive tackle out of Oregon has lost 25 pounds, down to 325. He is faster, stronger, quicker and poised to have a third straight Pro Bowl season. And the strike has helped. "I've used the time off to spend more time with my family," said Ngata, who is living Salt Lake City.
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By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2011
Prohibited by NFL rules to sign Haloti Ngata to a long-term deal, the Ravens secured the two-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle for next season by placing the franchise tag on him. If the Ravens' track record holds up, this is the first step to making him "a Raven for life. " The last two players who have received the franchise tag from the Ravens — cornerback Chris McAlister and linebacker Terrell Suggs — eventually signed muti-year deals that were among the richest for their positions at the time.
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By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2010
If the Ravens can clinch a playoff berth today at Cleveland Browns Stadium, Haloti Ngata will once again remember how his NFL prayers were answered by a hang-up. During the 2006 draft, Ngata thought the Browns were going to select him in the first round. He was on the phone with Cleveland officials when they were on the clock with the 12th pick and was told he would be their choice unless a trade happened. Then, the call abruptly ended. "They just hung up," Ngata said.
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By MIKE PRESTON | November 2, 2009
Quarterback B+ Joe Flacco was 20-for-25 for 175 yards. He didn't make a lot of tight, big-play throws, but he was nimble in the pocket, getting the ball off with bodies hurling around him. The touchdown pass to Derrick Mason was high and tight. It was perfect. Running backs B Every time Ray Rice touches the ball, he is a threat to score. He has great acceleration and the ability to burst through tackles. Fullback Le'Ron McClain has become a good lead blocker, and it was nice seeing him get carries down the stretch.
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September 18, 2009
1 Dominate Chargers offensive line. This is where the Ravens need to cause problems because San Diego could be without center Nick Hardwick (ankle) and right guard Louis Vasquez (knee). The Ravens' Haloti Ngata and Kelly Gregg are licking their chops. 2 Secondary has to get in sync. If running back LaDainian Tomlinson is sidelined, quarterback Philip Rivers will be flinging the ball all over the field. That means the Ravens need to correct their lapses from the season opener. 3 Keep spreading the ball around.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
Like most NFL defensive tackles, Haloti Ngata has an insatiable appetite. The 6-foot-4, 345-pound Ravens lineman loves to devour Italian food (except during the season when he tries to keep healthy), anything with curry and his latest favorite - Maryland steamed crabs. At Glen Burnie's Seaside Restaurant, Ngata will go through a dozen of the largest crabs without breaking a sweat. If you try to interrupt him, the affable Ngata has been known to strike a glare that would make Kansas City Chiefs running back Larry Johnson shudder, showing he has become a true Baltimore guy. "When he's eating crabs, you don't really get many words out of him," said his wife of two years, Christina.
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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | August 25, 2009
One of the popular phrases among reserves on the Ravens' vaunted defense is, "Don't be the weak link." Jameel McClain, a second-year linebacker, was the weak link one moment Monday night against the New York Jets and a defensive hero the next. McClain was badly out of position on a 19-yard touchdown pass from Mark Sanchez to Leon Washington with 5:50 left in the first half. On the sideline, middle linebacker Ray Lewis told McClain to get over the play quickly. Some five minutes later, McClain intercepted Sanchez's replacement, Kellen Clemens, and ran 16 yards untouched to the end zone for a touchdown.
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