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NEWS
March 26, 2004
Edward G. Zubler, a General Electric Co. research chemist who developed the halogen lamp in 1959, died Saturday at a Cleveland hospital after his heart stopped during recovery from surgery for a herniated disc. A decorated combat medic in Europe during World War II, Mr. Zubler began experimenting with halogen lighting technology when he joined the company's lighting research lab in 1953. "I was assigned to the project and told, `See what's going on, see what's making it work or not work,'" Mr. Zubler told the Smithsonian Institution, which lists his work among 20th- century inventions.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | June 22, 2008
Outdoor living once meant a grill, sticky webbed chairs, a crackling boom box and maybe a floodlight - a concept that has since morphed into a sophisticated outdoor kitchen, soft furniture and a fire pit to chase away the late-season chill. But with the expansion of cocooning, outdoor rooms and backyard entertaining now means good music and lighting are as much a part of the mood-making and fun of these living spaces as is the food. "Instead of traveling as much, you find more folks are staying home.
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NEWS
By GREG GARLAND | May 21, 2007
Nine families at an Edgemere apartment complex were displaced after a fire about 6:45 p.m. Saturday that started when a halogen lamp tipped over, a Baltimore County Fire Department spokesman said yesterday. The blaze was under control within about half an hour, but caused smoke damage throughout the three-story apartment building on Loring Court and heavy fire damage in the unit where it started, said spokesman Glenn Blackwell. "One person was trapped on the second floor and was rescued," he said.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND | May 21, 2007
Nine families at an Edgemere apartment complex were displaced after a fire about 6:45 p.m. Saturday that started when a halogen lamp tipped over, a Baltimore County Fire Department spokesman said yesterday. The blaze was under control within about half an hour, but caused smoke damage throughout the three-story apartment building on Loring Court and heavy fire damage in the unit where it started, said spokesman Glenn Blackwell. "One person was trapped on the second floor and was rescued," he said.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Bob Erlandson and Ross Hetrick and Bob Erlandson,Staff Writers | December 12, 1992
Bethlehem Steel Corp. said yesterday that a devastating fire at its No. 1 halogen tin-plating line early yesterday would have no immediate impact on its production of the steel used for tin cans and other containers.The line had been shut for repairs for the past three weeks, and the No. 2 halogen line for tin-plating would continue meeting customer demand, spokesman G. Ted Baldwin said.The effect on employment was not known, he said.The company, which employs 5,780 workers at its Baltimore County steel mill, just spent $3.5 million renovating the No. 1 halogen line in January and February, Mr. Baldwin said.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | September 14, 1997
AFTER WHAT might gently be characterized as the world's longest rain delay, work is once again under way on Karol's kitchen. She lived through half the winter with tarps for roofing and through the whole winter with a plywood wall between the existing space and the unfinished addition. But two weeks ago, the windows went in, the siding went on and the plywood came down.Now that she can look out, the view is not spectacular -- a big maple tree and the garage. But the windows are spectacular.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | June 22, 2008
Outdoor living once meant a grill, sticky webbed chairs, a crackling boom box and maybe a floodlight - a concept that has since morphed into a sophisticated outdoor kitchen, soft furniture and a fire pit to chase away the late-season chill. But with the expansion of cocooning, outdoor rooms and backyard entertaining now means good music and lighting are as much a part of the mood-making and fun of these living spaces as is the food. "Instead of traveling as much, you find more folks are staying home.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 3, 1993
Some designers -- I among them -- regard lighting as one of the most important but least understood elements in interior design. Almost everyone knows that ample amounts of natural light make a room a pleasant environment. Consequently, a good deal of thought is usually given to how daylight can enhance the look and feel of a particular setting. But far fewer people give the same degree of attention to artificial lighting. And only a very small number know how to integrate the two types of lighting so that they best serve the functional and aesthetic needs of an interior design.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 3, 2000
Better Homes and Gardens' editors have used technology to develop an "intelligent kitchen" that is both high-tech and livable. The kitchen was designed with input from the magazine's readers, according to Joan McCloskey, the magazine's executive building editor."
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 30, 1999
IF A LIGHT BULB burns out, does anyone change it? No one I live with.When the lights go out at our house, I begin to wonder if these people I live with are actually related to me.They seem to be creatures of darkness. If they encounter a lamp with a burned-out bulb, they keep moving, plunging into the abyss as if nothing were the matter.I, however, am a creature of light, a compulsive changer of bulbs, a lighter of lamps.As soon as a bulb fizzles, I feel the need to immediately replace it. If I don't have the right type of replacement bulb in storage I get irritated.
NEWS
March 26, 2004
Edward G. Zubler, a General Electric Co. research chemist who developed the halogen lamp in 1959, died Saturday at a Cleveland hospital after his heart stopped during recovery from surgery for a herniated disc. A decorated combat medic in Europe during World War II, Mr. Zubler began experimenting with halogen lighting technology when he joined the companys lighting research laboratory in 1953. I was assigned to the project and told see whats going on, see whats making it work or not work, Mr. Zubler told the Smithsonian Institution, which lists his work among 20th-century inventions.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 3, 2000
Better Homes and Gardens' editors have used technology to develop an "intelligent kitchen" that is both high-tech and livable. The kitchen was designed with input from the magazine's readers, according to Joan McCloskey, the magazine's executive building editor."
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | September 14, 1997
AFTER WHAT might gently be characterized as the world's longest rain delay, work is once again under way on Karol's kitchen. She lived through half the winter with tarps for roofing and through the whole winter with a plywood wall between the existing space and the unfinished addition. But two weeks ago, the windows went in, the siding went on and the plywood came down.Now that she can look out, the view is not spectacular -- a big maple tree and the garage. But the windows are spectacular.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 3, 1993
Some designers -- I among them -- regard lighting as one of the most important but least understood elements in interior design. Almost everyone knows that ample amounts of natural light make a room a pleasant environment. Consequently, a good deal of thought is usually given to how daylight can enhance the look and feel of a particular setting. But far fewer people give the same degree of attention to artificial lighting. And only a very small number know how to integrate the two types of lighting so that they best serve the functional and aesthetic needs of an interior design.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Bob Erlandson and Ross Hetrick and Bob Erlandson,Staff Writers | December 12, 1992
Bethlehem Steel Corp. said yesterday that a devastating fire at its No. 1 halogen tin-plating line early yesterday would have no immediate impact on its production of the steel used for tin cans and other containers.The line had been shut for repairs for the past three weeks, and the No. 2 halogen line for tin-plating would continue meeting customer demand, spokesman G. Ted Baldwin said.The effect on employment was not known, he said.The company, which employs 5,780 workers at its Baltimore County steel mill, just spent $3.5 million renovating the No. 1 halogen line in January and February, Mr. Baldwin said.
SPORTS
August 12, 2000
Quote: "It's a good environment, and you can tell it lights a fire under our fans, too. That's better than the normal sound you hear during the game, which is those halogen lights going buzzzzzzzz." - Angels' Darin Erstad, on the prospect of large crowds at Edison Field this weekend to see the Yankees It's a fact: The Tigers have four first basemen on the disabled list: Hal Morris (broken finger), Tony Clark (back), Gregg Jefferies (torn hamstring) and Robert Fick (separated shoulder).
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