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By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
The hallucinogen in the "magic mushrooms" of the 1960s can produce terror, paranoia and schizophrenia, but it can also spark a religious and mystical experience that leaves the user feeling kinder and happier, Johns Hopkins University scientists reported today. In a federally funded study, Hopkins researchers gave 36 volunteers pills containing psilocybin, a hallucinogen occurring naturally in some species of wild mushrooms. The volunteers then slipped on eye covers, put on headphones playing classical music and followed instructions to "look inward."
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
Thousands of young adults have been showing up in Internet videos in recent years demonstrating the intense effects of salvia, a hallucinogenic drug used for centuries by Mexican shamans for spiritual healing. And in a video released Friday, pop star Miley Cyrus appears to be the latest. While lawmakers in Maryland and other states have responded by banning or restricting the drug, Johns Hopkins researchers say the first scientific study on humans seems to show the brief mind alteration is not harmful — and salvia may eventually lead to new medicines.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | August 4, 2009
The Ocean City Council voted overwhelmingly Monday night to approve an emergency proposal to weed out products made from salvia divinorum, a relative of herbal sage and common garden plants that is now sold openly at many shops along the Boardwalk. The police and a majority of the council members threw their support behind the move to make possession and sale of the hallucinogenic substance a misdemeanor with a possible penalty of six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. The final vote was 6 to 1 in favor of the ban, which takes effect immediately.
NEWS
By Austin Lopez | June 7, 2010
Patients and potheads alike rejoiced a few weeks ago when the District of Columbia Council voted to legalize medical marijuana use. The unanimous decision adds D.C. to the 13 states that have already circumvented national legislation in order to allow doctors to write prescriptions for the infamous herb. (Maryland does not sanction medical marijuana but allows drug defendants to cite medicinal need as a potential mitigating factor.) Although the issue of medical marijuana remains contentious, the council's decision reflects the drug's growing acceptance in the eyes of the voting population.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | October 13, 1998
Not long ago it seemed the world was intent on remembering Kary Mullis more for his public antics than for his science.Sure, his 1993 Nobel-winning discovery let scientists make unlimited copies of DNA samples, but that's not what put Mullis in the public eye.Surfing and taking LSD did that. Slipping slides of naked women into his lecture, calling the empress of Japan "sweetie," cornering an Esquire reporter at his bedroom door and suggesting a more intimate way of getting to know him -- that's what took Mullis from the pages of Science to Elle.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | July 21, 1992
Q: I've read reports that LSD use among teen-agers in parts of Maryland is on the rise. I thought the drug went out of style in the '60s.A: Although government statistics show an overall downward trend for drug use among high school seniors, such a trend is not so evident for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Since 1984, the percent of teens using this drug has gone up: 1.9 percent of high school seniors answered they had used it in the last 30 days. Reports of increased use have been noted throughout the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Leary and Mike Leary,Sun Staff | March 28, 2004
Hash, by Torgny Lindgren, (translated by Tom Geddes). Overlook Press. 236 pages. $23.95. If you were alone in some hut on the frozen tundra of northern Sweden, with only the aurora borealis for illumination and a flask of aquavit for comfort, you might write a novel something like Hash, which refers not to the hallucinogen but to an awful offal dish. Sometimes made from squirrels, spiced with nutmeg to mask its offensive smell, it can be partaken hot, or frozen, then sliced up in slabs.
NEWS
By Austin Lopez | June 7, 2010
Patients and potheads alike rejoiced a few weeks ago when the District of Columbia Council voted to legalize medical marijuana use. The unanimous decision adds D.C. to the 13 states that have already circumvented national legislation in order to allow doctors to write prescriptions for the infamous herb. (Maryland does not sanction medical marijuana but allows drug defendants to cite medicinal need as a potential mitigating factor.) Although the issue of medical marijuana remains contentious, the council's decision reflects the drug's growing acceptance in the eyes of the voting population.
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | January 9, 1992
*TC In his new movie, "Naked Lunch," David Cronenberg ("The Fly") fleshes out some pretty heady concepts.The Canadian writer-director has transformed William S. Burroughs' scandalous 1959 novel into a squishy, hallucinogenic odyssey, replete with hybrid insect-typewriters; a writhing, squiggly, crustacean-like beast that embodies runaway lust; and emaciated reptilian creatures known as "mugwumps," who represent the addictive pleasures and perils of sex...
NEWS
July 6, 2008
Timothy Leary is smiling somewhere. More than 40 years after the U.S. government banned hallucinogens - those dangerous hippie indulgences - and scoffed at the Harvard psychologist and anyone else who suggested they might have a legitimate use, federal officials have become enlightened. The Food and Drug Administration has rightfully changed its stance on the research of psychedelic drugs. Instead of continuing a policy of fear and loathing, the government is now open to the possibility that this class of drugs may have uses that don't involve turning on, tuning in and dropping out. A new Johns Hopkins University study suggests that wild mushrooms or LSD may be helpful for victims of trauma or other psychological problems.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | August 4, 2009
The Ocean City Council voted overwhelmingly Monday night to approve an emergency proposal to weed out products made from salvia divinorum, a relative of herbal sage and common garden plants that is now sold openly at many shops along the Boardwalk. The police and a majority of the council members threw their support behind the move to make possession and sale of the hallucinogenic substance a misdemeanor with a possible penalty of six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. The final vote was 6 to 1 in favor of the ban, which takes effect immediately.
NEWS
July 6, 2008
Timothy Leary is smiling somewhere. More than 40 years after the U.S. government banned hallucinogens - those dangerous hippie indulgences - and scoffed at the Harvard psychologist and anyone else who suggested they might have a legitimate use, federal officials have become enlightened. The Food and Drug Administration has rightfully changed its stance on the research of psychedelic drugs. Instead of continuing a policy of fear and loathing, the government is now open to the possibility that this class of drugs may have uses that don't involve turning on, tuning in and dropping out. A new Johns Hopkins University study suggests that wild mushrooms or LSD may be helpful for victims of trauma or other psychological problems.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2008
More than a year after they took the hallucinogen found in "magic mushrooms," volunteers in a Johns Hopkins study rated the experience as one of the most meaningful and spiritually important of their lives, researchers reported today. The results suggest that hallucinogenic compounds, long considered taboo after widespread abuse in the late 1960s, represent both an untapped resource to help people cope with trauma, and a scientific tool for exploring human spirituality, the authors said.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
The hallucinogen in the "magic mushrooms" of the 1960s can produce terror, paranoia and schizophrenia, but it can also spark a religious and mystical experience that leaves the user feeling kinder and happier, Johns Hopkins University scientists reported today. In a federally funded study, Hopkins researchers gave 36 volunteers pills containing psilocybin, a hallucinogen occurring naturally in some species of wild mushrooms. The volunteers then slipped on eye covers, put on headphones playing classical music and followed instructions to "look inward."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Leary and Mike Leary,Sun Staff | March 28, 2004
Hash, by Torgny Lindgren, (translated by Tom Geddes). Overlook Press. 236 pages. $23.95. If you were alone in some hut on the frozen tundra of northern Sweden, with only the aurora borealis for illumination and a flask of aquavit for comfort, you might write a novel something like Hash, which refers not to the hallucinogen but to an awful offal dish. Sometimes made from squirrels, spiced with nutmeg to mask its offensive smell, it can be partaken hot, or frozen, then sliced up in slabs.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Ecstasy, a drug popular at all-night dance parties known as "raves," appears to damage brain cells that release a chemical responsible for mood, memory and pain perception, a study has found.RTC Dr. George Ricaurte, a neurologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, conducted brain scans on people who had used the illicit drug an average of 200 times over a five-year period. The destruction was greatest among the most frequent users.The drug damaged cells that release serotonin, a natural chemical that is associated with feelings of well-being.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2008
More than a year after they took the hallucinogen found in "magic mushrooms," volunteers in a Johns Hopkins study rated the experience as one of the most meaningful and spiritually important of their lives, researchers reported today. The results suggest that hallucinogenic compounds, long considered taboo after widespread abuse in the late 1960s, represent both an untapped resource to help people cope with trauma, and a scientific tool for exploring human spirituality, the authors said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | August 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- He saw planets materialize in black space, then vanish. He saw his ancestors flee a European pogrom. He saw leaders felled by assassins, a bug devour a green leaf, his young daughter looking hopeful.In a darkened apartment in Holland, Adam Nodelman had taken a hallucinogenic drug called ibogaine, a plant extract used in Gabon, West Africa, to initiate people into a tribal religion. He was dreaming while awake, watching rapid-fire images replay the history of the world, the laws of nature, the events of his life.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | October 13, 1998
Not long ago it seemed the world was intent on remembering Kary Mullis more for his public antics than for his science.Sure, his 1993 Nobel-winning discovery let scientists make unlimited copies of DNA samples, but that's not what put Mullis in the public eye.Surfing and taking LSD did that. Slipping slides of naked women into his lecture, calling the empress of Japan "sweetie," cornering an Esquire reporter at his bedroom door and suggesting a more intimate way of getting to know him -- that's what took Mullis from the pages of Science to Elle.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | August 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- He saw planets materialize in black space, then vanish. He saw his ancestors flee a European pogrom. He saw leaders felled by assassins, a bug devour a green leaf, his young daughter looking hopeful.In a darkened apartment in Holland, Adam Nodelman had taken a hallucinogenic drug called ibogaine, a plant extract used in Gabon, West Africa, to initiate people into a tribal religion. He was dreaming while awake, watching rapid-fire images replay the history of the world, the laws of nature, the events of his life.
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