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Halloween

FEATURES
By Bill Messenger | October 31, 1993
When I was a kid, nothing except opening Christmas presents held more excitement for me than the Highlandtown Halloween Parade. An endless procession marched, crept or slithered up Eastern Avenue from what was then called City Hospitals to what is still called Patterson Park. There, on a high wooden platform, four masked men passed judgment on the weird gathering below, handing out 10-dollar bills to the kids wearing the most unusual costumes.If those costume parades held a few thrills for me, they held much more for Tony Jacobs.
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NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 2001
ON A CRISP fall night last week, more than 500 people marched down Westminster's Main Street in the 57th annual Halloween Parade. Fairies, spiders, brides, butterflies, Indian princesses, Westminster resident Greg Williams walking as a "chick magnet" and many other characters took the traditional stroll for hundreds of onlookers. More than 20 members of the GFWC Junior Woman's Club of Westminster perched on a rollback truck (donated by Leckron's Towing employee Bobby Westerfield) and wrestled with decisions such as which costume was the most original, the most comical and the most elaborate.
FEATURES
October 4, 2005
We're looking for "high-concept" Halloween costumes - ones that are more abstract than literal. Dressing like a "Freudian slip" or as "static cling," for instance, takes a bit more imagination than going as an M&M. Think more in terms of ideas or states of mind than the usual ghosts, goblins and politicians. The most clever costumes will be considered for inclusion in an article in The Sun's Modern Life section. E-mail jpg photos - with your name, phone number and a brief explanation of your costume - to sun.features@baltsun.
NEWS
November 3, 1999
Last time, we asked: Should Halloween be observed on the last Saturday of October? Some people think so. When Oct. 31 falls on a weekday, children and parents must squeeze trick-or-treating and festivities in after school and work, often after dark, raising a safety issue. Celebrating on Saturday would allow earlier trick-or-treating and give families time to schedule other Halloween events, such as parties. What do you think?I definitely don't think that they should switch it to the last Saturday.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | October 30, 1992
ATLANTA -- On Halloween, Tasia Katapodis will dress as a witch to thrill young trick-or-treaters in her neighborhood. Ross Marland plans a resurrection as "dead Elvis" in sideburns and a sheet. And Ron Watson will transform himself into a singing Hank Williams Jr. -- with the help of a Stetson, some shades and a beer.In Atlanta and across the country, Halloween has become an excuse for adults to party."In the mid '80s, we began seeing a trend for adults and teens," says Betsy Helgager, a spokeswoman for Hallmark Cards.
NEWS
October 28, 1998
The Baltimore SAFE KIDS Coalition and University of Maryland Medical Center are urging parents to take precautions to make sure children have a safe Halloween.Parents are being urged to accompany children who are under 10 years of age, to use light, brightly colored costumes that are more visible, to teach children not to dart into streets from between parked cars and to keep candles, lighted jack-o-lanterns, matches and lighters out of their reach.Pedestrian injuries, burns and falls account for the majority of injuries on Halloween, which safety experts say is one of the most dangerous nights of the year for children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | October 20, 2005
The U.S. Naval Academy Choir's Halloween extravaganza, directed by Monte Maxwell, chapel organist and assistant director of music at the academy, arrives in Baltimore this week. The concert, which draws thousands to its Annapolis performancae each year, adds lighting and special effects to accompany a Fright Night kind of program, including Bach's spooky Tocatta and Fugue in D minor and music from Phantom of the Opera. The concert is at 8 p.m. Friday at Second Presbyterian Church, 4200 St. Paul St. Tickets are $15. Call 410-663-3052.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
In Carroll County, some towns tolerate Halloween, a few discourage it and the rest celebrate it.Most allow trick or treating, but restrict the hours and limit participants to costumed children under age 12. Residents who welcome young visitors Thursday night are urged to turn on outdoor lights.After a 20-year gap, Manchester will allow trick or treating again. The town threw its annual Halloween gala for all residents Saturday at Manchester Elementary School.Mayor Elmer C. Lippy, who arrived in a Roman toga, said he expected a few outsiders to crash the party.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2000
Be afraid. Be very afraid. Of ghosts and goblins. Of witches and black cats. Of Frankenstein's monster. Of things that go bump in the night. Halloween is nigh, and all manner of macabre events await the unprepared. So get a clue by reading this roundup of frightful Halloween events. But fear not; we've also included many happenings of a gentler nature, such as trick-or-treating, pumpkin-carving and apple-bobbing for kids of all ages. Anne Arundel County Halloween celebration. Oct. 28, 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Historic Annapolis Foundation, William Paca Garden, 186 Prince George St., Annapolis.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 1998
SATURDAY IS Halloween, bringing the excitement of neighborhood children donning costumes and rushing from door to door gathering candy treats.Use extra caution while driving Saturday and watch for little people.Here are family Halloween events.Family Harvest PartySt. Stephen's Reformed Episcopal Church in Eldersburg will hold its annual Family Harvest Party from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.The event is free and offers a safe, fun, family alternative to trick or treating. Costumes are optional.
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