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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Army has abruptly reversed itself and decided to pay all of Halliburton Co.'s fees to house and feed U.S. troops in Iraq and Kuwait after the company threatened to legally challenge the effort to penalize it. The Houston oil-and-service company announced early Tuesday that the Army had decided to pay just 85 percent for services in the war zone after a dispute over how the company calculated its bills. But late Tuesday, a spokeswoman for the Army Field Support Command said the 15 percent penalty for the company's Kellogg Brown and Root subsidiary - amounting to an estimated $60 million a month - would not be levied.
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NEWS
November 23, 2013
Regarding commentator Jules Witcover's column on President Barack Obama's leadership, Mr. Obama's competence is in politics and campaigning; he is not a leader, a manager or even an administrator ( "His cool gone, Obama needs to show competence," Nov. 18). He has proven this time and time again with the IRS scandal, Benghazi, Operation Fast and Furious, NSA spying, journalists being spied upon, etc., etc. He has even made former Vice President Dick Cheney and his Halliburton connection look good.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - Pentagon auditors said Halliburton Corp. might have overcharged by more than $100 million on a contract to deliver fuel to Iraq in the early days of the war, according to a report released yesterday. Among other items, the Pentagon's Defense Contract Audit Agency said Halliburton charged $27.5 million to deliver $82,100 worth of liquefied petroleum gas. It called that "illogical." The report also faulted Halliburton for misleading auditors, poorly managing multimillion-dollar subcontracts and failing to deliver key documents to justify prices paid for fuel.
NEWS
October 20, 2012
It has been 50 years this month since the Cuban missile crisis, but I remember the terror of it. We were hours away from six missiles, each with the strength of eighty Hiroshima bombs, being launched against the eastern seaboard before Nikita Khrushchev called them back to Russia. Jack Kennedy was our President, and we will evermore be grateful for his handling of it. If there were ever again a crisis of such magnitude, which of the two presidential candidates would we want to make decisions: Barack Obama, who seems to carefully deliberate in his decision making ("leading from behind")
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 2004
HOUSTON - Halliburton said yesterday that it was severing all ties with Albert J. Stanley, until recently one of its highest-ranking executives, after investigations showed he secretly enriched himself by channeling as much as $5 million from an elaborate payment scheme for a Nigerian energy project to a Swiss bank account. Halliburton, one of the world's largest oil services companies, also said it was cutting ties with another executive involved in the scheme, William Chaudan. The two men retired from KBR, formerly known as Kellogg, Brown & Root, Halliburton's large engineering and construction unit, but continued to work for the company as consultants.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 24, 2004
Halliburton Co. said yesterday that it might shed the subsidiary being investigated for possible overcharges on a huge military services contract in Iraq because the business is a drag on its share price and profit. A sale or spinoff of KBR would end Halliburton's business in Iraq, where at least 45 employees supporting U.S. troops have been killed. Iraq contracts worth as much as $18.6 billion have made Halliburton and its former chief executive, Vice President Dick Cheney, a target for criticism by Democrats, including presidential candidate John Kerry.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - Halliburton Co., the biggest contractor for rebuilding Iraq, faced escalating scrutiny yesterday over allegations that it had systematically overbilled the U.S. government. The company absorbed sharp questions on Capitol Hill, and the Justice Department launched an inquiry that could bring civil or criminal charges. At issue is whether Halliburton, formerly led by Vice President Dick Cheney, overcharged $61 million for gasoline and routinely provided incomplete or inaccurate information on costs of gasoline and other services.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - Halliburton, the big contractor that has won a big share of government contracts to rebuild Iraq, significantly and systematically violated federal contracting rules by providing inaccurate and incomplete information about its costs, according to a Dec. 31 report by Defense Department auditors. But 16 days after the report and after a second warning by Pentagon auditors, the Army Corps of Engineers gave Halliburton, formerly headed by Vice President Dick Cheney, a new $1.2 billion contract.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - Halliburton Inc. was hit yesterday with some of the sharpest criticism yet over its work in Iraq and Kuwait, as government auditors faulted its control over subcontractors and as whistle-blowers alleged massive overspending. The Defense Contract Audit Agency found that Halliburton's system of billing the government for billions of dollars of contracts was "inadequate in part," failing to follow the company's own internal procedures or even determine whether subcontractors performed work.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - Halliburton, Vice President Dick Cheney's former company, said yesterday that it had fired two employees who allegedly accepted kickbacks in return for helping a subcontractor overbill the Pentagon's Iraq reconstruction program by $6.3 million. Halliburton officials said they informed Pentagon Inspector General Joseph Schmitz last week that an internal audit found that two employees of the company's Kellogg, Brown & Root subsidiary might have accepted improper payments from a Kuwaiti subcontractor as part of an effort to bilk the Pentagon.
NEWS
June 11, 2010
On April 20, a BP drilling rig on the Gulf Mexico exploded, causing the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The oil rig was leased to BP by Transocean, and Halliburton was working on sealing off the well before the blast. Everyone pointed fingers, and accusations flew back and forth. An entire investigation has been launched, but that is the least of our worries. Every day, 12,000 to 25,000 barrels worth of oil is leaking into the Gulf of Mexico. Animals wash up on shore black as night because they are covered in oil. The beaches that were once white from sand have turned black.
NEWS
May 7, 2008
Boomers contribute to nation's wealth If columnist Jay Hancock really wants to have an honest discussion about our nation's current fiscal mess, let's start with the facts ("Boomers planting a debt bomb," April 30). American workers and taxpayers who are between 44 and 62 years old (the baby boomers) didn't create our current budget crisis; the Bush administration and its allies in Congress did that. President Bush inherited a budget surplus and a Social Security trust fund built up in preparation for baby boomers' retirements.
NEWS
March 14, 2007
Halliburton officials say shifting the oil service giant's center of gravity from Texas to the Persian Gulf is just a "strategic" move to drum up more oil business. Chief Executive David Lesar even lanced the announcement that he was moving himself and his CEO headquarters to the United Arab Emirates city of Dubai into the middle of a weekend energy conference in Bahrain. The implication: It is no big deal, especially since Halliburton promises not to reincorporate overseas, which would have huge tax consequences, or to uproot its 4,000-employee Houston headquarters.
NEWS
By Bloomberg News | March 12, 2007
Halliburton Co., the world's second-largest oilfield services provider, will move Chief Executive Officer David Lesar to a new corporate headquarters in Dubai to help the company expand in the Middle East and Asia. The move is part of an effort to shift business outside North America, which provided 55 percent of Halliburton's profit last quarter, and to court national oil companies that pump most of the oil in the Middle East. The company will keep a corporate office in Houston, where it has its headquarters today, the company said in a statement.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When the Abu Ghraib prison scandal broke in early 2004, thanks to leaked photos taken by some of our soldiers, I suggested then that cameras should be issued to all of our soldiers. Then we wouldn't have to wait for the Pentagon or the White House to let us folks back home know what we should be outraged about. I wrote as a Vietnam-era veteran who was appreciating - more than Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld was - the ability of today's digital technology to empower ordinary GIs to get their side of war stories out, warts and all. Little did I know that filmmaker Deborah Scranton was in the process of providing video cameras to three National Guardsmen from New England so they could do what I was suggesting: record video journals of their unit's yearlong deployment in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - Congressional Democrats demanded yesterday an investigation into the demotion of a senior U.S. military contracting official who publicly criticized a no-bid contract awarded to Halliburton Corp. for work in Iraq. With more than 20 years experience in government procurement, Bunnatine Greenhouse had been the Army Corps of Engineers' top contracting officer until she was demoted Saturday to a lower-level staff position. A military report indicated that she was demoted for poor job performance.
BUSINESS
By NEWSDAY | May 30, 2002
Wendy Hall, WASHINGTON - An aggressive accounting maneuver adopted at Halliburton Co. when Vice President Dick Cheney directed the huge oilfield services business is being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission. By claiming added construction costs before they were received, the accounting change increasingly helped the company's bottom line grow from $89 million to $234 million over the past four years, bolstering a sagging profit picture at a company that had $13 billion in revenues last year.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon's comptroller said yesterday he saw "no basis whatsoever" to believe Vice President Dick Cheney's former company deliberately overcharged the Pentagon for oil deliveries to Iraq. Instead, the potential overcharge appeared to stem from an outdated accounting and cost-estimating system within Halliburton Co., said the comptroller, Dov Zakheim. The company's KBR unit, formerly known as Kellogg, Brown & Root Inc., failed to analyze fully the price it was charged by a Kuwaiti supplier, he said.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
KNOCKING Halliburton is easy. The defense contractor once headed by Vice President Dick Cheney has made a ton of money from the wars of the Bush administration. Criticizing U.S. abuse of prisoners from those wars is easy, too; in fact, it's like shooting fish in a barrel because the abuses have been so flagrant, the contrition has been so lacking, the useful intelligence gleaned from the detainees has been so scarce, and the damage to America's standing and honor has been so spectacular.
NEWS
May 27, 2005
WHAT TO DO? And whom to blame? These are the two time-honored questions that Russian revolutionaries used to pose when things went wrong. Now, they weren't thinking of power failures brought on by too much modern air conditioning in a booming city suffering through a 90-degree heat wave in May even though it's farther north than Ketchikan, Alaska - but they would have been no less trenchant if they had. Several million Muscovites lost their electricity Wednesday....
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