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NEWS
September 30, 2008
On September 28, 2008, DESSIE HALLEY. Friends may visit the family owned March Funeral Home West, Inc., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Wednesday after 8:30 A.M., where family will receive friends on Thursday at 11:30 A.M., followed by funeral service at 12 noon.
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NEWS
September 30, 2008
On September 28, 2008, DESSIE HALLEY. Friends may visit the family owned March Funeral Home West, Inc., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Wednesday after 8:30 A.M., where family will receive friends on Thursday at 11:30 A.M., followed by funeral service at 12 noon.
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NEWS
June 7, 2006
On June 1, 2006, THOMAS J., JR.; beloved husband of Sue B. Halley (nee Burkins); devoted father of Thomas J. Halley, III and his wife Tammy and Steven C. Halley and his wife Chryssa; loving grandfather of Steven, Emilee, Brian and Bradley. Family and friends are invited to a Gathering at the Loch Raven United Methodist Church, 6622 Loch Raven Blvd, on Thursday, June 8, from 10 to 11 AM at which time all are invited to the Memorial Service. A luncheon/reception will follow in the church hall.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
On June 1, 2006, THOMAS J., JR.; beloved husband of Sue B. Halley (nee Burkins); devoted father of Thomas J. Halley, III and his wife Tammy and Steven C. Halley and his wife Chryssa; loving grandfather of Steven, Emilee, Brian and Bradley. Family and friends are invited to a Gathering at the Loch Raven United Methodist Church, 6622 Loch Raven Blvd, on Thursday, June 8, from 10 to 11 AM at which time all are invited to the Memorial Service. A luncheon/reception will follow in the church hall.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
Robert M. Halley, a sailmaker and foreman of the rigging department at the Naval Academy who helped to build the first Pride of Baltimore, died Saturday of an aneurysm at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. He was 44 and lived in White Hall. Mr. Halley had been foreman of the rigging department, located at the Small Craft Facility across the Severn River from the academy, since 1977. Under his supervision were 20 sloops, 25 "knockabouts," and American Promise, a 60-foot sloop used as a training vessel for midshipmen.
NEWS
June 9, 2003
On June 6, 2003, WALTER PERRY BROWN; beloved husband of Olivia F. Brown (nee Stagnoli); loving father of Linda and David Rein, Bonnie and Michael Miller and Tammy and Thomas Halley; devoted grandfather of Susan and Abdul Shah, William and Christine Baxley, IV, Timothy and Tina Rein, Wendy Miller, Amy Miller, Rebecca Rein, Tracy Miller, Emilee Halley and Bradley T. Halley; great-grandfather of Kyle, Stephanie, Victoria, Johnathan, Rayaz, Justin and Andrew....
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 2, 2002
NEW GERMANY - Hampered by freezing temperatures, high winds and blowing snow, a search team failed to find a Cumberland man who was missing from a deer-hunting trip early Saturday in a wilderness area of Garrett County. Robert Halley Sr., 65, was reported missing about 12:45 a.m. yesterday by his son, said Heather Lynch, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. "He came home from work and realized his dad was not at home," Lynch said. Halley left his home between 6 a.m. and 6:30 a.m. Saturday to hunt in New Germany State Park, Lynch said.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 18, 2003
As tough as it is being a teen-ager, it's even tougher making a movie about teens that neither condescends nor oversimplifies. How to Deal does neither in its depiction of a young girl struggling with love, sex and independence, trying to find her place in the world at a time everyone insists she's too young to have one. The result is far from a great movie, but it's a noble effort that deserves plenty of credit for trying. Mandy Moore, playing a far more complex character than in her first film, A Walk to Remember, is Halley Martin, a conflicted and confounded 16-year-old who is certain of only one thing: She never wants to fall in love.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 17, 1997
Joe Halley is backstage in the dark at the Maryland Science Center planetarium, dodging cables as he wrestles a projector onto a shelf for a new star show. One down, 74 to go."It gets worse as you go along," says the chief technician, fiddling with the plug. "Some are an absolute nightmare to get up."Setting up projectors is one of the last hurdles in the rush to put on the program about the Underground Railroad's use of the night sky. It will start Jan. 25."Follow the Drinking Gourd: Stars of Freedom," partly based on a children's book, tells the tale of how the Big Dipper, also known as the Drinking Gourd, provided a sense of direction to escaping slaves.
NEWS
By Barbara Tufty | October 20, 1990
Washington. TOMORROW NIGHT the earth spins through the flaming wake of debris left by Halley's comet. Look up in the sky and you'll see a night slashed with shooting stars.Each year in October, the earth plows through the rock fragments, ice, and dust that mark Halley's ghostly orbit. Thousands of pieces of the comet's debris, called meteoroids while traveling in space, collide with the earth's atmosphere some 80 to 60 miles high and, ignited with the heat of friction, arc down the sky like falling stars.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2005
The first, and surely the biggest, blast on this Fourth of July will burst 83 million miles from the Inner Harbor. Just before 2 a.m. tomorrow, NASA scientists led by University of Maryland astronomer Michael A'Hearn will send an 820-pound projectile from their Deep Impact spacecraft into the path of an onrushing comet. They're hoping that the 23,000-mph collision - a wallop equivalent to igniting about 4 1/2 tons of TNT - will knock out some of the comet's stuffing, which scientists believe has not changed since the birth of the solar system.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 18, 2003
As tough as it is being a teen-ager, it's even tougher making a movie about teens that neither condescends nor oversimplifies. How to Deal does neither in its depiction of a young girl struggling with love, sex and independence, trying to find her place in the world at a time everyone insists she's too young to have one. The result is far from a great movie, but it's a noble effort that deserves plenty of credit for trying. Mandy Moore, playing a far more complex character than in her first film, A Walk to Remember, is Halley Martin, a conflicted and confounded 16-year-old who is certain of only one thing: She never wants to fall in love.
NEWS
June 9, 2003
On June 6, 2003, WALTER PERRY BROWN; beloved husband of Olivia F. Brown (nee Stagnoli); loving father of Linda and David Rein, Bonnie and Michael Miller and Tammy and Thomas Halley; devoted grandfather of Susan and Abdul Shah, William and Christine Baxley, IV, Timothy and Tina Rein, Wendy Miller, Amy Miller, Rebecca Rein, Tracy Miller, Emilee Halley and Bradley T. Halley; great-grandfather of Kyle, Stephanie, Victoria, Johnathan, Rayaz, Justin and Andrew....
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 2, 2002
NEW GERMANY - Hampered by freezing temperatures, high winds and blowing snow, a search team failed to find a Cumberland man who was missing from a deer-hunting trip early Saturday in a wilderness area of Garrett County. Robert Halley Sr., 65, was reported missing about 12:45 a.m. yesterday by his son, said Heather Lynch, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. "He came home from work and realized his dad was not at home," Lynch said. Halley left his home between 6 a.m. and 6:30 a.m. Saturday to hunt in New Germany State Park, Lynch said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
Robert M. Halley, a sailmaker and foreman of the rigging department at the Naval Academy who helped to build the first Pride of Baltimore, died Saturday of an aneurysm at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. He was 44 and lived in White Hall. Mr. Halley had been foreman of the rigging department, located at the Small Craft Facility across the Severn River from the academy, since 1977. Under his supervision were 20 sloops, 25 "knockabouts," and American Promise, a 60-foot sloop used as a training vessel for midshipmen.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2000
Halley meets Haley on Sunday at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, when actor John Amos presents his one-man play, "Halley's Comet," in a benefit performance for the Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation. Amos, who portrayed enslaved African Kunta Kinte in "Roots," the television miniseries based on the late Haley's Pulitzer Prize-winning family chronicle, has toured internationally with the play he wrote about an 87-year-old man witnessing the passing of Halley's comet for the second time.
NEWS
By Cheryl L. Tan and Cheryl L. Tan,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1997
COLLEGE PARK -- Comet Hale-Bopp played celestial hide-and-seek early yesterday, teasing an audience of 50 who showed up at 4 a.m. in College Park to catch a glimpse of one of the brightest comets in centuries.Instead of burning gloriously in the sky, the comet remained hidden by clouds for half the time, flashing now and then. But the eager watchers were undeterred."There's a certain bizarre romance to getting up at 4 in the morning and seeing this," said John Trasco, associate director of the University of Maryland astronomy department, who organized the event.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2005
The first, and surely the biggest, blast on this Fourth of July will burst 83 million miles from the Inner Harbor. Just before 2 a.m. tomorrow, NASA scientists led by University of Maryland astronomer Michael A'Hearn will send an 820-pound projectile from their Deep Impact spacecraft into the path of an onrushing comet. They're hoping that the 23,000-mph collision - a wallop equivalent to igniting about 4 1/2 tons of TNT - will knock out some of the comet's stuffing, which scientists believe has not changed since the birth of the solar system.
NEWS
By Cheryl L. Tan and Cheryl L. Tan,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1997
COLLEGE PARK -- Comet Hale-Bopp played celestial hide-and-seek early yesterday, teasing an audience of 50 who showed up at 4 a.m. in College Park to catch a glimpse of one of the brightest comets in centuries.Instead of burning gloriously in the sky, the comet remained hidden by clouds for half the time, flashing now and then. But the eager watchers were undeterred."There's a certain bizarre romance to getting up at 4 in the morning and seeing this," said John Trasco, associate director of the University of Maryland astronomy department, who organized the event.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 17, 1997
Joe Halley is backstage in the dark at the Maryland Science Center planetarium, dodging cables as he wrestles a projector onto a shelf for a new star show. One down, 74 to go."It gets worse as you go along," says the chief technician, fiddling with the plug. "Some are an absolute nightmare to get up."Setting up projectors is one of the last hurdles in the rush to put on the program about the Underground Railroad's use of the night sky. It will start Jan. 25."Follow the Drinking Gourd: Stars of Freedom," partly based on a children's book, tells the tale of how the Big Dipper, also known as the Drinking Gourd, provided a sense of direction to escaping slaves.
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