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By Arda Ocal | March 13, 2013
Looking at his overall resume, you could say that David Otunga is one of the most successful people among the WWE Superstars. Aside from achieving the near impossible task of cracking the WWE roster, Otunga graduated from Harvard with a law degree. Now, he has added another big item to his resume - actor. A lifelong dream of his, Otunga can now claim he has shared the big screen with Hollywood darling and Academy Award winner Halle Berry in "The Call," WWE Studios' latest release.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
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FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 6, 2008
The earth moved! Eric Benet, promoting his new Love & Life CD, showed up at the Manhattan offices of Essence magazine last week, and wowed a roomful of female journalists by launching into an a cappella version of his new song, "Chocolate Legs." At the climatic musical moment when it seemed like Eric had made 20 intimate friends for life, news came of the L.A. earthquake. Eric put an instant stop to the mass swoon, and called his 16-year-old daughter, India, frantically. She was fine. "Oh, Daddy, it was no big deal!"
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | March 13, 2013
Looking at his overall resume, you could say that David Otunga is one of the most successful people among the WWE Superstars. Aside from achieving the near impossible task of cracking the WWE roster, Otunga graduated from Harvard with a law degree. Now, he has added another big item to his resume - actor. A lifelong dream of his, Otunga can now claim he has shared the big screen with Hollywood darling and Academy Award winner Halle Berry in "The Call," WWE Studios' latest release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Gerston and Jill Gerston,New York Times News Service | March 17, 1995
When considering Halle Berry, it is almost impossible not to focus on her beauty: The exquisite cheekbones, the flawless cafe au lait skin, the eyes like two huge dark caramels and the wrists so narrow they look as if they could almost fit through the hole of a doughnut.Her hair is shorn to her skull and slicked back in a style that only super models can carry off. Twinkling in her ear lobes are large diamond studs, an anniversary gift from her husband, the Atlanta Braves outfielder David Justice.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 21, 2002
Halle Berry gave one of Oscardom's longest and most moving speeches in March when she became the first black woman to win the best-actress accolade. And she still has something to say. Her Oscar was for Monster's Ball, a small but harrowing film that was shot in four weeks in the Deep South. Starting tomorrow, she'll be seen in Die Another Day, a James Bond opus that's anything but small. It required six months of location shooting in Iceland, England and Spain. She plays Jinx, the good/bad girl who gives Pierce Brosnan's 007 more than he bargained for. What Berry wants us to know is that Jinx is one Bond girl who doesn't swoon.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | February 17, 1993
Before Sunday night and the start of "Queen," she was known primarily for her work in the film "Boomerang," her haircut and her recent marriage to Atlanta Braves right-fielder David Justice.Suddenly, millions of people, some of whom never heard of her a week ago, are debating her performance in the title role as Alex Haley's grandmother in the CBS miniseries that concludes tomorrow night at 9 on WBAL (Channel 11). Halle Berry's got people talking."I hope people will like me," Berry said in an interview in Los Angeles before the miniseries aired.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Szymanski and Mike Szymanski,ZAP2IT.COM | July 22, 2004
LOS ANGELES -- Halle Berry is the cat's meow these days. Or, at least, she is with Catwoman. "I have watched my cat, and I listen to how he purrs and plays and walks and when he gets angry," Berry says. "And there's a sound that he makes that I've tried to use, too." Her cat is one of the 60 homeless cats used in a scene in her last film, Gothika, with Robert Downey Jr. In that film, she played a successful psychiatrist who is accused of brutally killing her husband. Berry's mother worked as a psychiatric nurse, and she helped her with the role.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 11, 2005
Given all that has happened in his very public private life over the past five years or so, it's easy to forget that Eric Benet was once a promising recording artist. The R&B singer's last album, 1999's A Day in the Life, went gold, spurred by the success of two singles: a funky remake of Toto's "Georgy Porgy," featuring Faith Evans, and the charming ballad "Spend My Life With You," a duet with Tamia. Then in 2001, Benet married actress Halle Berry, one of the most celebrated beauties in Hollywood.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 19, 2002
As the emotionally spent and psychologically tattered wife who unwittingly seeks solace in the arms of the racist white prison guard who oversaw her husband's final days, Halle Berry gives what may be the year's rawest, most devastating performance in Monster's Ball. It finally should elevate the 33-year-old actress above the ranks of the simply beautiful. It may even win her an Oscar. Leticia Musgrove couldn't have been an easy part to play. She's a woman without a tether. Her husband has been executed.
NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun news services | October 8, 2008
Esquire dubs Halle Berry 'sexiest woman alive' "I don't know exactly what it means, but being 42 and having just had a baby, I think I'll take it," says Halle Berry, about her being named the sexiest woman alive by Esquire magazine in its November issue. Berry, who gave birth to daughter Nahla in March, says she can't claim the honor all for herself. "I share this title with every woman, because every woman is a nominee for it at any moment," she says. Funniest man - this year Larry Doyle, a former TV writer-producer for The Simpsons, was named the winner Monday of this year's Thurber Prize for American Humor.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 6, 2008
The earth moved! Eric Benet, promoting his new Love & Life CD, showed up at the Manhattan offices of Essence magazine last week, and wowed a roomful of female journalists by launching into an a cappella version of his new song, "Chocolate Legs." At the climatic musical moment when it seemed like Eric had made 20 intimate friends for life, news came of the L.A. earthquake. Eric put an instant stop to the mass swoon, and called his 16-year-old daughter, India, frantically. She was fine. "Oh, Daddy, it was no big deal!"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 19, 2007
Sometimes a foreign director wins the attention of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, swiftly gets a shot at big-time American moviemaking - and reveals himself or herself to be a modest talent when the work is stripped of subtitles. That's the case with Rendition's Gavin Hood (the South African Oscar-winner for Tsotsi) and also the Danish writer-director Susanne Bier. She has followed the American art house successes of Open Hearts (2002) and her Oscar-nominated After the Wedding (2006)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 15, 2007
PHILADELPHIA Few were surprised when Halle Berry was named 2004's Worst Actress at the Razzie Awards, an annual lambasting of the year's worst films held the night before the Oscars. But what happened after her "win" for playing the title character in Catwoman surprised nearly everyone. "Ladies and gentlemen," Razzies founder John Wilson intoned from the stage of Hollywood's Ivar Theatre, "Halle Berry." When Berry herself appeared, wearing a Cheshire-cat grin on her face, the Oscar she'd won for 2001's Monster's Ball in her left hand and the Razzie in her right, the audience gave her a standing ovation.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 13, 2007
No one is who they seem in Perfect Stranger, but the promise of the unexpected comes across as a boast, not a challenge. Instead of heightening the intrigue in this psychological thriller, the labored twists and out-of-leftfield turns will leave audiences more weary than wary. Halle Berry, in her most challenging role since Monster's Ball, for which she won an Oscar, is Rowena Price, who opens the film as one seriously ticked-off investigative journalist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 4, 2005
American television's first Muslim hero arrives tonight on Showtime in a 10-part series that takes dead aim at post-9/11 jitters. The question, however, is do we really want our worst national nightmares played out as prime-time entertainment? Set in Los Angeles and shot-through with acts of intense violence, Sleeper Cell tracks an al-Qaida cell and the FBI agent who penetrates it. Think Donnie Brasco meets The Sopranos - only instead of a mob family, it's a terrorist group that the FBI is trying to crack.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2002
With his shimmering gowns and rich brocade dresses, Lebanese designer Elie Saab's haute couture pieces have adorned Arabian queens and celluloid stars from Catherine Deneuve to Bo Derek. But until Halle Berry stepped onto Oscar's magical red carpet in a spectacular, burgundy Elie Saab gown Sunday, the little-known designer was hardly a regular in the pages of Vogue, much less a household name. One night, however, can make all the difference. After dressing Hollywood's new Cinderella on the biggest night of her career, the question in America's fashion industry this week has been, "Who's Elie Saab?"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2002
Two and a half hours into the 74th annual Academy Awards, the extravaganza reached an emotional highpoint when veteran actor Sidney Poitier took the stage to accept his honorary Oscar and the entire Academy took to its feet. But it would be just one golden moment in a historic night that welcomed the Oscars into their new home and saw some old ghosts laid emphatically to rest, with Halle Berry and Denzel Washington joining Poitier as the only African-Americans ever to win best acting Oscars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 11, 2005
Given all that has happened in his very public private life over the past five years or so, it's easy to forget that Eric Benet was once a promising recording artist. The R&B singer's last album, 1999's A Day in the Life, went gold, spurred by the success of two singles: a funky remake of Toto's "Georgy Porgy," featuring Faith Evans, and the charming ballad "Spend My Life With You," a duet with Tamia. Then in 2001, Benet married actress Halle Berry, one of the most celebrated beauties in Hollywood.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Whether drawn as a cartoon or disguised as Catwoman, the striking features of Halle Berry are readily recognized by movie fans. That recognition is achieved by a surprisingly small group of brain cells, an international team of researchers reports in today's edition of the journal Nature. Most researchers had thought that specific memories were spread out over large groups of brain cells, or neurons. However, the new study showed that small clusters of cells responded to specific people or objects, such as Jennifer Aniston or the Sydney Opera House, regardless of changes in their appearance, and sometimes just by seeing the name of the objects.
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