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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 1, 2000
When I reviewed Lynn's at 554 E. Fort Ave. this spring, about the only critical thing I said was, "It's an expensive restaurant for a blue-collar neighborhood." Now that's changed with the arrival of a new chef, 28-year-old Charles Warner. He was most recently assistant chef and banquet chef at the Polo Grill, and before that executive chef at the now-closed Harvey's in Green Spring Station. Warner's new menu at Lynn's is a fusion of Asian and American. "I have a long history of Asian cooking because I started off at the Pimlico," he explains.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 29, 1999
During the past 10 years, my husband and I have been fortunate enough to spend a few weeks each summer in southern France. Celebrated for its natural beauty, the region boasts rugged mountains, beautiful beaches and endless fields of lavender and flowers.For art lovers, there are myriad museums that house masterpieces of painters who lived and worked in Provence. Then, of course, there's the perfect summer weather -- warm and almost always sunny.But my reason for returning time and again to this area is to savor the delicious yet unpretentious food.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | October 25, 2006
Even avowed fish lovers often shy away from cooking seafood at home. Chief among the reasons for this piscaphobia are worries about freshness and confusion about cooking methods. But two studies released last week give fish fans new incentive to move past those doubts in the name of good health. A Harvard School of Public Health study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that eating one to two servings of fish a week could reduce by a third the chances of dying from a heart attack, and that the health benefits of eating seafood strongly outweigh the risks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
Who said there are no second acts in American dining? Clyde's of Columbia has been an anchor on the Columbia lakefront since 1975. That's impressive, but time has a way of catching up with everything. And now that Columbia is in the middle of a multi-year downtown revitalization, it was time to freshen up Clyde's, too. So Clyde's closed in late 2012, gave itself a $5 million renovation, and reopened in April. The renovations are both structural and cosmetic. Returning patrons might not notice things like the new sprinkler system, but they'll note that Clyde's has moved closer to the lake - an extension has added both breathing room and additional booth seating.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX and CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 10, 2006
Poaching fish in liquid is an age-old method that ensures moist, tender results. But chefs of late have been experimenting with poaching seafood in olive oil, claiming you get the same moist results but with the boost of flavor that comes from the oil. We tried the method with a salmon fillet. The key is low heat and slow cooking. The fillet came out moist throughout with an almost but not quite flaky texture. Any type of sturdy fish fillets or steaks may be cooked with this simple method.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - Thomas Keller is watching me slice an onion, and he is not pleased. "Get closer to the food," he says and demonstrates that instead of keeping my distance, I should be hovering over the onion and the knife. Closer is safer, Keller says. Then, with a flash of humor, he tells me you can't show fear in the kitchen, otherwise the knives will sense it and trouble will follow. "It is like dogs," he says. "They know when you are afraid." As a former paperboy, Keller knows about dogs.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | January 18, 1995
Fish and citrus fruit. It's a perfect marriage of flavors.And the time is ripe.I long to match citrus with fish, a symbiotic pairing that makes fish taste fabulous. Even "fishy" fish becomes mild-mannered when complemented with citrus.Fried calamari become a delicacy with a generous squeeze of lemon juice.Sauteed scallops can make your palate snap to attention when a splash of orange juice is lightly drizzled on top.Better yet, poach salmon fillets in a mixture of orange juice, shallots and a little fish stock (or clam juice)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Hamilton Tavern, on the corner of Harford Road and Wisteria Avenue, is a rare thing - a true neighborhood tavern with citywide appeal. The official city-designated neighborhood for this address is Glenham-Belhar, but as Tom Creegan, the Brewer's Art partner who runs Hamilton Tavern, noted, everybody up there calls this neighborhood just plain Hamilton. I know folks from all over Baltimore who have adopted Hamilton Tavern as their own, and the nice folks who run the place and the Hamilton residents that frequent it have been more than decent about sharing it with the city at large.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2003
Who says you can't go home again? For lots of folks, Peerce's Plantation was like a second home - the place to celebrate birthdays, anniversaries, graduations, bar mitzvahs, weddings. Or just to enjoy dinner out. When Peerce's closed 2 1/2 years ago, many mourned its passing. Guess what reopened this week? New owners Eric and Jackson Dott, with the help of general manager Peter Weston, have spent months renovating the old building to bring back the feeling of Peerce's glory days. Weston says they've entirely rebuilt and revamped the structure but kept the basic design the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Aggio, the serenely pretty new restaurant at Power Plant Live, invites you to take a pleasure cruise through contemporary Italian cuisine. Your captain is Bryan Voltaggio, the genial chef who first gained national exposure as a contestant on "Top Chef. " If Voltaggio is not a name in your household, know that it is in those that follow dining news as entertainment. He is, to put it plainly, a celebrity chef. But don't let that stop you. In culinary circles, Voltaggio is better known for his flagship restaurant Volt, which he opened in 2008 in his hometown of Frederick, and which continues to operate, six summers later, as a modernist dining mecca, the kind of place that diners plan their visits for months in advance.
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