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By Karol V. Menzie | November 20, 1994
Bob Ribbler has always made brownies, so when he was looking for a new career recently, he decided to bake his exotic, luxurious brownies for a living. "They've got tons of chocolate in them. They're very rich," Mr. Ribbler says. They also have a creamy, truffle-like texture.You can try Bob's Brownstone brownies in Grand Marnier, white chocolate, mocha, peanut butter, mint or other flavors by mail order. Call (718) 369-2627.You'll flipSome of the cleverest cookbooks I've seen lately are the "stand up and flip over" series from Oliver Books.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 1, 2000
When I reviewed Lynn's at 554 E. Fort Ave. this spring, about the only critical thing I said was, "It's an expensive restaurant for a blue-collar neighborhood." Now that's changed with the arrival of a new chef, 28-year-old Charles Warner. He was most recently assistant chef and banquet chef at the Polo Grill, and before that executive chef at the now-closed Harvey's in Green Spring Station. Warner's new menu at Lynn's is a fusion of Asian and American. "I have a long history of Asian cooking because I started off at the Pimlico," he explains.
NEWS
By New York Times | July 16, 1991
The boundless harvests of the sea are not so limitless anymore, researchers say.Nearly one-fifth of the world's annual fish and shellfish harvests is caught within 200 miles of the United States coastline. Bays, estuaries and wetlands appear to be among the most imperiled habitats.Only 15 percent of the major fish species are yielding stocks near their potential level, according to a report by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation."The 1990s will definitely be a time of reckoning in the fishing industry," said Brian J. Rothschild, a biologist at the University of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 28, 2001
Z'Tejas Southwestern Grill opened this week next to P. F. Chang's at The Mall in Columbia. It's another one of those classy chains, with handsome decor and a bustling atmosphere. Z'Tejas' co-founder is Paul Fleming, the "P. F." in P. F. Chang's. It seems to be something of a trend: branches of joint-partnership chains nestling together. (Another example is Outback Steakhouse and Carrabba's Italian Grill.) Z'Tejas is a little different from other Southwestern restaurants because Louisiana food is part of the mix. You can get ancho pork tenderloin and Cajun grilled chicken, for instance.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | October 25, 2006
Even avowed fish lovers often shy away from cooking seafood at home. Chief among the reasons for this piscaphobia are worries about freshness and confusion about cooking methods. But two studies released last week give fish fans new incentive to move past those doubts in the name of good health. A Harvard School of Public Health study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that eating one to two servings of fish a week could reduce by a third the chances of dying from a heart attack, and that the health benefits of eating seafood strongly outweigh the risks.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 29, 1999
During the past 10 years, my husband and I have been fortunate enough to spend a few weeks each summer in southern France. Celebrated for its natural beauty, the region boasts rugged mountains, beautiful beaches and endless fields of lavender and flowers.For art lovers, there are myriad museums that house masterpieces of painters who lived and worked in Provence. Then, of course, there's the perfect summer weather -- warm and almost always sunny.But my reason for returning time and again to this area is to savor the delicious yet unpretentious food.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
Who said there are no second acts in American dining? Clyde's of Columbia has been an anchor on the Columbia lakefront since 1975. That's impressive, but time has a way of catching up with everything. And now that Columbia is in the middle of a multi-year downtown revitalization, it was time to freshen up Clyde's, too. So Clyde's closed in late 2012, gave itself a $5 million renovation, and reopened in April. The renovations are both structural and cosmetic. Returning patrons might not notice things like the new sprinkler system, but they'll note that Clyde's has moved closer to the lake - an extension has added both breathing room and additional booth seating.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | January 18, 1995
Fish and citrus fruit. It's a perfect marriage of flavors.And the time is ripe.I long to match citrus with fish, a symbiotic pairing that makes fish taste fabulous. Even "fishy" fish becomes mild-mannered when complemented with citrus.Fried calamari become a delicacy with a generous squeeze of lemon juice.Sauteed scallops can make your palate snap to attention when a splash of orange juice is lightly drizzled on top.Better yet, poach salmon fillets in a mixture of orange juice, shallots and a little fish stock (or clam juice)
NEWS
By Marion Winik and Marion Winik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 2003
For most of us, champagne is less a beverage than a symbol of celebration: the sparkling glass we lift to toast the new year, a marriage, a promotion. The question of whether it goes better with lobster or lamb might never occur to us. "People don't even think of champagne as wine," says Baltimore wine expert Al Spoler, co-host of Cellar Notes on WYPR-FM. "Certainly not as something you'd see on the table with dinner." OK, then, let's start with breakfast. "One of the great food-and-wine pairings is scrambled eggs with smoked salmon and champagne," says Serena Sutcliffe, the British director of wine for Sotheby's auction house and the author of Champagne: The History and Character of the World's Greatest Wine (Simon & Schuster, 1988)
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
At the turn of the Jewish New Year, who can resist signs of renewal, or even miracles? With the New Year beginning Friday night, imagine the sense of wonder in turning to page 26 of a new cookbook, Kosher by Design, to find a vision in green, orange and white, a triple-layer wedge of delight and delicacy that could proudly be served by the finest cake baker. But wait a minute, it's not a slice of cake. It's ... Gefilte fish? The page heading, Tricolor Gefilte Fish, appears above this picture of loveliness, a disconnect of word and image that perhaps demands translation here.
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