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By GAIL FORMAN | October 25, 1992
When I visited Alaska last summer, I ate halibut every day, sometimes twice a day, and not because there was nothing else to eat in the 49th state. It was just that, in my experience, the fish was so deliciously prepared.Halibut's snowy white flesh -- lean, firm textured and mild flavored -- lends itself to a variety of cooking methods. My favorite is grilled, but the fish is also delicious sauteed, fried, baked, poached or steamed. And halibut steaks are superb for kebabs and stews because the meat doesn't fall apart during cooking.
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By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | February 14, 2013
Brooke, Josh, and Sheldon remain, splayed out on the sofas and clearly exhausted. Brooke finds a note from Padma telling them to meet her at the Eagle Crest. Is that an Alaskan Leather Bar? I'm excited. They drive up a long mountain and are stopped by a helicopter in the middle of the road. A lady approaches the car and announces she's their pilot and they'll be taking the bird up the rest of the way to meet Padma. Brooke is not cool with this. The helicopter involves three of her biggest fears -- heights, being in an enclosed space, and having no control.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 2004
Geri Baird of Las Vegas requested a recipe for baked halibut in a sour-cream sauce that she had clipped from the Los Angeles Times many years ago, and since has lost. Jerry Barkdoll of Baltimore writes that she lived for 10 years in southeast Alaska and often prepares halibut with sour cream. She follows a recipe developed by Caddy Gantry, who herself lived and traveled all over Alaska with her husband, who operated crab and salmon canneries. This is a simple do-ahead preparation that produces a very tasty and moist fish as long as you are careful not to overcook it. The recipe would work well on almost any mild fish fillet.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
The Perfect Recipe for Losing Weight & Eating Great By Pam Anderson Weight Watchers All-Time Favorites Over 200 Best-Ever Recipes From the Weight Watchers Test Kitchens Wiley / $29.95 / 2008 This book has no inspiring back story, no narrative, nothing but 225 recipes. The Weight Watchers people don't even bother to tell you how they chose these best-ever ideas. But like Pam Anderson's, the recipes are not diet-y. And they're good. Here, too, the portions are small. The Mussels in Spicy Tomato Broth - easy to make and it turned out well - tells you to eat 30 mussels (OK)
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | October 10, 2007
Olives and fennel are two common ingredients of the Mediterranean region. I love to combine them with fresh fish, and though we may not get the same species found in that sun-dappled area of the world, we have our choice of plenty from our own coasts. I find halibut works well with these simple flavors, but red snapper or even fresh-water trout can shine here. Team the dish with ripe tomatoes, tossed in a salad, and a lemon tart from the bakery. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
This recipe comes from Chef Paul Jarrett of the Oceanaire Seafood Room in Harbor East. Jarrett particularly loves halibut from Alaska, which are now available. PAN-ROASTED HALIBUT FILLET WITH CURRIED PINEAPPLE SALSA MAKES 6 SERVINGS 6 8-ounce halibut fillets salt and black pepper to taste clarified butter or vegetable oil, as needed 4 scallions, thinly sliced on a bias 1 recipe Curried Pineapple Salsa (see below) Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Season halibut with salt and pepper. Heat a thin layer of clarified butter or oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 26, 2006
This recipe by chef Bridget Harrington of California's Fetzer Vineyards calls for using its Fetzer Valley Oaks Estate Grown Organic Olive Oil, which is available online at fetzer.com. The oil is used almost as a sauce. ROASTED HALIBUT WITH FRESH-PEA MASHED POTATOES MAKES 4 SERVINGS POTATOES: 4 russet potatoes 2 cups fresh or frozen peas 1 cup cream, half-and-half or milk 1 / 2 stick (1 / 4 cup) butter 1 / 2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil HALIBUT: 1 1 / 2 pounds halibut fillet, cut into 4 pieces 1 / 2 teaspoon sea salt Freshly ground pepper 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 8 herb sprigs, such as thyme, parsley or rosemary For the potatoes, place potatoes in a large saucepan; cover with water.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | September 20, 1998
While in Portland, Ore., a few months ago, I dined at Zefiro, an innovative restaurant serving cuisine with Mediterranean and Asian accents. The food was superb. In fact, my main course of Steamed Halibut With Indonesian Coconut Sauce was so impressive that I asked our waiter if the chef would tell me how it was prepared. Much to my surprise and delight, the server returned with a printed recipe.On my own, I would have never been able to unravel the different tastes in this delicious creation.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 7, 2000
The word light had a different meaning before Americans turned fat-gram counting into a national obsession. After a winter of stews, potatoes and heavy noodle dishes, cooks look forward to foods that feel physically or psychologically light. Cooks turn from the brown colors of winter cooking to the greens, reds and yellows of spring. Thanks to modern transportation, we don't have the rigid separation of seasons that our grandparents faced. During January, we can have potatoes followed by raspberries in cream.
NEWS
By RUSS PARSONS and RUSS PARSONS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2006
Seafood lovers who have been following fish news know that it's going to be a long spring. Salmon, the king of the season's fish, is missing in action and its prices are likely to stay high through the summer. But, as Momma used to say, there's never a door that closes without a window opening somewhere else. This season's silver lining is Pacific halibut, which, thanks to the salmon shortage, might finally get its moment in the spotlight. Halibut is a fish with charms all its own. While salmon is rich and assertive, halibut is mild-mannered.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | October 10, 2007
Olives and fennel are two common ingredients of the Mediterranean region. I love to combine them with fresh fish, and though we may not get the same species found in that sun-dappled area of the world, we have our choice of plenty from our own coasts. I find halibut works well with these simple flavors, but red snapper or even fresh-water trout can shine here. Team the dish with ripe tomatoes, tossed in a salad, and a lemon tart from the bakery. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Brad Schleicher | April 18, 2007
EVENTS Fundraiser -- Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland will hold a fundraiser featuring a cake competition with both professional and amateur bakers. Cakes will be judged, auctioned and available to taste at 2:30 p.m. April 29 at the Youth Center next to Woods Memorial Church, 617 Baltimore Annapolis Blvd., Severna Park. $12. Tickets can be purchased at the door or by calling 410-571-8341, or e-mailing lgoodman@fcsmd.org. Halibut wine dinner --A five-course wine dinner, prepared by executive chef Benjamin Erjavec, will feature dishes using halibut as the main ingredient at 6:30 p.m. April 27 at the Oceanaire Seafood Room, 801 Aliceanna St. $85. Reservations are required; call 443-872-0000.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | November 1, 2006
Cooking en papillote means baking something -- fish fillets often -- on a bed of aromatic vegetables in a pouch of parchment or foil. The contents of the pouch steam in their juices, their flavors mixing. We love the romance of en papillote: First, you cut a giant heart from the parchment or foil. Then, when you serve, each diner opens his own personal pouch to get a fragrant poof of steam. Very cool. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By RUSS PARSONS and RUSS PARSONS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2006
Seafood lovers who have been following fish news know that it's going to be a long spring. Salmon, the king of the season's fish, is missing in action and its prices are likely to stay high through the summer. But, as Momma used to say, there's never a door that closes without a window opening somewhere else. This season's silver lining is Pacific halibut, which, thanks to the salmon shortage, might finally get its moment in the spotlight. Halibut is a fish with charms all its own. While salmon is rich and assertive, halibut is mild-mannered.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
This recipe comes from Chef Paul Jarrett of the Oceanaire Seafood Room in Harbor East. Jarrett particularly loves halibut from Alaska, which are now available. PAN-ROASTED HALIBUT FILLET WITH CURRIED PINEAPPLE SALSA MAKES 6 SERVINGS 6 8-ounce halibut fillets salt and black pepper to taste clarified butter or vegetable oil, as needed 4 scallions, thinly sliced on a bias 1 recipe Curried Pineapple Salsa (see below) Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Season halibut with salt and pepper. Heat a thin layer of clarified butter or oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 26, 2006
This recipe by chef Bridget Harrington of California's Fetzer Vineyards calls for using its Fetzer Valley Oaks Estate Grown Organic Olive Oil, which is available online at fetzer.com. The oil is used almost as a sauce. ROASTED HALIBUT WITH FRESH-PEA MASHED POTATOES MAKES 4 SERVINGS POTATOES: 4 russet potatoes 2 cups fresh or frozen peas 1 cup cream, half-and-half or milk 1 / 2 stick (1 / 4 cup) butter 1 / 2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil HALIBUT: 1 1 / 2 pounds halibut fillet, cut into 4 pieces 1 / 2 teaspoon sea salt Freshly ground pepper 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 8 herb sprigs, such as thyme, parsley or rosemary For the potatoes, place potatoes in a large saucepan; cover with water.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
The Perfect Recipe for Losing Weight & Eating Great By Pam Anderson Weight Watchers All-Time Favorites Over 200 Best-Ever Recipes From the Weight Watchers Test Kitchens Wiley / $29.95 / 2008 This book has no inspiring back story, no narrative, nothing but 225 recipes. The Weight Watchers people don't even bother to tell you how they chose these best-ever ideas. But like Pam Anderson's, the recipes are not diet-y. And they're good. Here, too, the portions are small. The Mussels in Spicy Tomato Broth - easy to make and it turned out well - tells you to eat 30 mussels (OK)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | March 24, 2004
SPRING INSPIRES RASH behavior. At the first breath of tender weather, we throw on shorts, ride around in convertibles and fire up grills. All these activities make sense in July. But in the faux warmth of spring, they can inflict pain. Like the convertible riders who start off with their tops down but end up with their windows up and their heaters blasting, we backyard grillers have a tendency to push it, to pretend life is sunnier than it really is. This is especially true in March, the trickiest month for the backyard griller.
NEWS
August 24, 2005
Frozen fish fillets, always at the ready in your freezer, are quick to cook, low-calorie and quite nutritious - and if you purchase large packages with 10 or 12 fillets, they are economical as well. (Of course, if there's time, you can stop at the market and buy fresh fillets.) The downside: Alone, they can be bland. But seafood is so easy to dress up. Here, we're topping halibut fillets with a colorful, zesty salsa inspired by one from Robb Walsh's The Tex-Mex Cookbook. Don't be alarmed by the ingredient list: All you do is chop these items and combine them in a bowl.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 2004
Geri Baird of Las Vegas requested a recipe for baked halibut in a sour-cream sauce that she had clipped from the Los Angeles Times many years ago, and since has lost. Jerry Barkdoll of Baltimore writes that she lived for 10 years in southeast Alaska and often prepares halibut with sour cream. She follows a recipe developed by Caddy Gantry, who herself lived and traveled all over Alaska with her husband, who operated crab and salmon canneries. This is a simple do-ahead preparation that produces a very tasty and moist fish as long as you are careful not to overcook it. The recipe would work well on almost any mild fish fillet.
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