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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | April 12, 1994
David Halberstam had been planning to speak about the 1950s for the Frank R. Kent Memorial Lecture at Johns Hopkins University tonight. But Tonya Harding changed his mind.Rather, it was the media's overheated coverage of the Olympic skater's trials and tribulations that got him concerned -- along with what he sees as the increasing tendency of the press to concentrate on the trivial at the expense of the important.So he's shelved his original topic, "The Fifties -- Then and Now," in favor of a speech that will pointedly criticize much of modern journalism, he said in a phone conversation from his New York home.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Once heralded as "The Jewish Jordan," Tamir Goodman never lived up to the hype. A national celebrity at 17 as a junior at the Talmudical Academy in Pikesville, Goodman faded out of the spotlight by the time he turned 20. Without his disappointments in basketball, Goodman said in an interview this week, he would not be as prepared for the end of his professional playing career in Israel and the beginning of a new one. He will announce his retirement at...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By William K. Marimow and William K. Marimow,Sun Staff | January 17, 1999
Almost 15 years after Michael Jordan and Buzz Peterson became close friends, the two men were golfing in Chicago when Jordan -- out of the blue -- thanked his college teammate for making him a "very, very good basketball player."Peterson, who never made it to the National Basketball Association, was mystified: Why would Jordan be thanking him? Because, as Jordan explained, Buzz had been the golden boy of North Carolina high school basketball, so at every practice in college, Jordan was telling himself, "You've got to be better than Buzz.
SPORTS
December 30, 2007
Last hurrah With his wild beard, love for beer and passionate gesticulations from the upper deck, Wild Bill Hagy taught a generation of Baltimoreans what it meant to be a fan. Hagy, who died in August at 68, was the face of a rowdy Memorial Stadium crowd that helped propel the Orioles to improbable comebacks in the late 1970s and early 1980s. When he stood and began forming with his arms the letters "O-R-I-O-L-E-S," thousands knew it was time to deliver some magic. Hagy was a cabdriver by day but rarely missed a game by night, until he stormed out to protest a new rule preventing fans from bringing beer to the park.
NEWS
April 13, 1995
In his mind, Jacob Halberstam, a bright 6-year-old who attends Hampstead Elementary School in Carroll County, doesn't have a disability. Though he was born with stumps for arms and one leg half the length of the other, young Jacob plays soccer, hockey, draws, reads, rides horses and keeps up with his classmates and siblings. There seems to be little he cannot do.The youngster, in fact, can't understand why anyone would single him out for an award. When the Foundation for Exceptional Children bestowed on Jacob a "Yes I Can" award in the category of independent living, his mother, Bonnie Halberstam, explained to her son that he was being recognized for all the things he could do that come easier to children without physical handicaps, such as going to the bathroom alone.
NEWS
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Mr. Kusnet was a speech writer for former Democratic presidential candidates Walter Mondale and Michael Dukakis | June 9, 1991
THE NEXT CENTURY.David Halberstam.Morrow.126 pages. $16.95. Perhaps more than any other living journalist, Pulitzer Prize winner David Halberstam has covered the stories that shaped our times. Sometimes he's paid the price for being right too soon.As a young reporter covering the Vietnam War, Mr. Halberstam made enemies in high places when he refused to accept the official story that everything was going just fine. Later, he was kicked out of Poland for writing stories about the abject failure of the communist system.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | June 5, 1993
New York -- When David Halberstam began working on his big book on America in the 1950s, one thing he did not have to do was reorient his thinking about the decade. No one had to tell him it wasn't a time of "Happy Days" and a grandfatherly president who played golf while the rest of America had cookouts in the backyards of their new suburban homes.Then, as now, David Halberstam was on the outside, looking in. A son of Jewish immigrants, he felt an outsider while at Waspy Harvard in the mid-'50s.
NEWS
April 13, 1995
"October 1964," David Halberstam's chronicle of the end of the nearly all-white New York Yankee dynasty, will be reviewed at the next session of "Books Sandwiched In" at noon April 20 at Western Maryland College in McDaniel Lounge.Greg Alles, associate professor of religious studies, will share his views of the work, which focuses on the different racial attitudes of the National and American leagues.The Cardinals, a Southern team, welcomed black players while the Yankees had only token integration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | September 23, 2001
War in a Time of Peace: Bush, Clinton, and the Generals, by David Halberstam. Scribner. 544 pages. $28. For an author who wrote the hugely acclaimed earliest book defining the Vietnam War, it surely took considerable courage to undertake a sequel 30 years later. Yet that is what David Halberstam has produced, and he has pulled it off wonderfully well. His new book exploring the intractable tensions between the political and military cultures of America is every bit as good as The Best and the Brightest.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | April 25, 2007
The news of David Halberstam's death hit me like a sharp jab in the chest. It was strange because I don't generally experience strong feelings at the passing of public people. But I had only to stare at my bookcase to know the reason. When you own every book a man has written and you've pored over some of them until the covers are smudged and the corners worn, you feel you know him a little. I started my reminiscences by pulling Summer of '49 from an upper shelf. It was the first Halberstam book I owned, bought for me by my mother when I was 13. I was already a devout baseball nut by then, and I could've told anyone that the Yankees won the World Series that year.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | September 23, 2007
The Coldest Winter America and the Korean War By David Halberstam Hyperion / 736 pages / $35 The Korean War was a tragedy of errors. It began because Secretary of State Dean Acheson removed Korea from the defensive perimeter of the United States. Convinced that America would not intervene, the Soviet Union approved the plan of Kim Il Sung to attack South Korea. President Harry S. Truman then sent U.S. troops to the divided nation, under a United Nations mandate agreed to at a meeting boycotted by the Russians.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | April 25, 2007
The news of David Halberstam's death hit me like a sharp jab in the chest. It was strange because I don't generally experience strong feelings at the passing of public people. But I had only to stare at my bookcase to know the reason. When you own every book a man has written and you've pored over some of them until the covers are smudged and the corners worn, you feel you know him a little. I started my reminiscences by pulling Summer of '49 from an upper shelf. It was the first Halberstam book I owned, bought for me by my mother when I was 13. I was already a devout baseball nut by then, and I could've told anyone that the Yankees won the World Series that year.
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Sun Reporter | April 24, 2007
David Halberstam, a tireless reporter who produced richly detailed chronicles of some of the great stories in modern American history - from the struggle for civil rights to Vietnam to the decline of the Detroit auto industry - as well as biographies of an array of sports heroes, was killed in a car crash yesterday morning in Menlo Park, south of San Francisco. He was 73. Mr. Halberstam died at the scene of the accident, after the car in which he was a front-seat passenger was broadsided by another vehicle.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | January 24, 2006
The Education of a Coach David Halberstam Hyperion Books/277 pages It should be noted somewhere that no author of any real regard ever went broke attempting to romanticize the sport of baseball, or the men who played it. For decades, through the media of fiction, nonfiction and occasionally film, writers such as John Updike, W.P. Kinsella, Gay Talese, Roger Angell, Bernard Malamud and Roger Kahn have waxed poetic about the sport, telling us, occasionally...
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Fallujah. Kirkuk. Najaf. Ramadi. Even Baghdad. For some observers, this week's coverage of the widespread, intensified armed resistance to the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq has summoned up ghosts of a past conflict: the January 1968 Tet Offensive during the Vietnam War. U.S. forces ultimately quelled that uprising, which led to battles for control of cities throughout South Vietnam. But its depth and sophistication - reflected on the networks' nightly news in millions of homes throughout the country - shook the confidence of many Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | September 23, 2001
War in a Time of Peace: Bush, Clinton, and the Generals, by David Halberstam. Scribner. 544 pages. $28. For an author who wrote the hugely acclaimed earliest book defining the Vietnam War, it surely took considerable courage to undertake a sequel 30 years later. Yet that is what David Halberstam has produced, and he has pulled it off wonderfully well. His new book exploring the intractable tensions between the political and military cultures of America is every bit as good as The Best and the Brightest.
NEWS
By Bruce Clayton | May 30, 1993
THE FIFTIES.David Halberstam.Villard.800 pages. $28.David Halberstam's big, luminous book on America during the 1950s makes the decade seem like only yesterday. Elvis Presley and James Dean hit the scene then; so did television, the Marlboro Man, Holiday Inns, Dr. Kinsey, "double ugly" tail fins on Detroit's gas guzzlers, "I Love Lucy," Marilyn Monroe and Marlon Brando, Playboy magazine, hoop skirts for girls, flattops or greaser haircuts for boys, gray flannel suits for organization men, the Pill for women, and McDonald's 10-cent hamburgers and golden arches for everybody.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | September 23, 2007
The Coldest Winter America and the Korean War By David Halberstam Hyperion / 736 pages / $35 The Korean War was a tragedy of errors. It began because Secretary of State Dean Acheson removed Korea from the defensive perimeter of the United States. Convinced that America would not intervene, the Soviet Union approved the plan of Kim Il Sung to attack South Korea. President Harry S. Truman then sent U.S. troops to the divided nation, under a United Nations mandate agreed to at a meeting boycotted by the Russians.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | April 1, 2001
When his father died, Jim Fitzsimmons was devastated -- and surprised by the depth of his sadness. His dad, a longtime mason, had been the "king of the family," as solid and dependable as the bricks he had fashioned into homes for much of his life. For months after the funeral, Jim's allergies worsened. An ankle injury throbbed. He couldn't bring himself to drive down the street of his 84-year-old father's old house, a mere three blocks from his Arbutus home. "It was more than I had expected," recalls Jim, a job counselor to disabled people.
NEWS
August 3, 2000
Solomon Halberstam, 92, the grand rabbi who led the Bobov sect of Orthodox Hasidic Jews out of Europe after World War II and oversaw its rebirth, gaining tens of thousands of followers, died yesterday in New York. Thousands of mourners had started gathering after Mr. Halberstam was taken to a hospital late Tuesday with internal bleeding. Mr. Halberstam, a descendant of one of the first Hasidic leaders in Europe, survived the purge of Jews by the Nazis, along with his son, Naftali. The rest of his family was killed, including his father, his youngest brother and three brothers-in-law.
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