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By Mohamad Bazzi and Mohamad Bazzi,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2003
TEHRAN, Iran - Before prison and torture, before life in exile, before surviving seven assassination attempts and the execution of dozens of his relatives, Ayatollah Muhammad Bakr al-Hakim wished only to become a Muslim theologian. By the age of 25, al-Hakim had achieved his goal and was teaching Islamic law in Baghdad. The choice he made to become a Shiite Muslim cleric - like his grandfather, father and older siblings - set him on a lifelong confrontation with the secular Iraqi regime and a life in which religion and politics were inextricably linked.
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NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The Shiite heir apparent to a key U.S. political ally added his voice yesterday to calls for the division of Iraq into semiautonomous regions based on sect and ethnicity, throwing down a gauntlet on an issue that has stirred fierce emotions in Iraq. Ammar Hakim's statement before hundreds of supporters gathered for prayers marking the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan came just weeks after passage of a nonbinding Senate resolution calling for a devolution of power to three self-governing regions for Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1997
A convicted drug smuggler from Anne Arundel County who authorities say has been a fugitive for nearly a decade has been arrested in Georgia and will now serve the 13-year prison sentence he has avoided, federal officials announced yesterday.Members of the U.S. Marshal's Fugitive Task Force said they arrested Abdul M. Hakim last night outside his wife's home in Decatur, Ga., a residential neighborhood in suburban Atlanta.Deputy U.S. Marshal Matt Burke said the 53-year-old suspect, who was born Calvin Tyrone Fleming in Cleveland, tried to pass himself off as a West African and produced a passport from Ghana.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- With a blue-ribbon commission about to urge President Bush to seek help from Iran and Syria in Iraq, a Iraqi Shiite leader with ties to Tehran said in the Oval Office yesterday that his country's problems could not be solved through such regional or international efforts. Bush has balked at inviting Iran and Syria to help end the civil war there. Yesterday's remarks by Abdelaziz Hakim, leader of the largest Shiite bloc in the Iraqi parliament, gave the president an important Iraqi ally on the question two days before the bipartisan Iraq Study Group is scheduled to deliver its report.
NEWS
By Azadeh Moaveni and Azadeh Moaveni,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2003
NAJAF, Iraq - Ending a homecoming tour through southern Iraq, a leading Shiite Muslim arrived yesterday in his native town, Najaf, where he was greeted by a crowd of several thousand people eager to know what role he intends to play now that Saddam Hussein is gone. After 23 years in exile in Iran, Ayatollah Mohammed Bakr Hakim told the crowd that the new Iraq should be Islamic and democratic. Islam "achieves independence for us," he said, adding that the future of Iraq must be built around free elections.
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The Shiite heir apparent to a key U.S. political ally added his voice yesterday to calls for the division of Iraq into semiautonomous regions based on sect and ethnicity, throwing down a gauntlet on an issue that has stirred fierce emotions in Iraq. Ammar Hakim's statement before hundreds of supporters gathered for prayers marking the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan came just weeks after passage of a nonbinding Senate resolution calling for a devolution of power to three self-governing regions for Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds.
NEWS
May 2, 2003
Albert A. Hakim, 66, an Iranian-born former Silicon Valley businessman who was a central figure in the Reagan administration's Iran-Contra scandal of the 1980s, died of a heart attack April 25 in Inchon, South Korea, where he moved a few years ago. Charged with five felony counts of conspiracy to divert funds illegally to the Nicaraguan contras and theft of government property, Hakim pleaded guilty in 1989 to a single misdemeanor count of making an...
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | December 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- One day after returning from Middle East meetings that defined anew the depths of his administration's problems in Iraq, President Bush invited two key Iraqi leaders to the White House in the coming weeks, expanding his contacts among the Shiite Muslim and Sunni Arab communities. Bush plans to meet on Monday with Abdelaziz Hakim, leader of the United Iraqi Alliance, one of the two main parties in the majority Shiite governing alliance, and in January with Iraqi Vice President Tariq Hashimi, the head of the largest party representing Iraq's Sunni minority.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- With a blue-ribbon commission about to urge President Bush to seek help from Iran and Syria in Iraq, a Iraqi Shiite leader with ties to Tehran said in the Oval Office yesterday that his country's problems could not be solved through such regional or international efforts. Bush has balked at inviting Iran and Syria to help end the civil war there. Yesterday's remarks by Abdelaziz Hakim, leader of the largest Shiite bloc in the Iraqi parliament, gave the president an important Iraqi ally on the question two days before the bipartisan Iraq Study Group is scheduled to deliver its report.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
SAN DIEGO -- Less than a month ago, San Diego State senior wide receiver Az-zahir Hakim sat in a California jail, uncertain not only of his football future, but of his life.The All-America candidate had been arrested on suspicion of joining two teammates in the gang rape of an 18-year old woman at his home in El Cerrito and was being held on $1 million bail. After two days of turmoil and negative publicity, Hakim was released when the district attorney ruled there was insufficient evidence.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | December 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- One day after returning from Middle East meetings that defined anew the depths of his administration's problems in Iraq, President Bush invited two key Iraqi leaders to the White House in the coming weeks, expanding his contacts among the Shiite Muslim and Sunni Arab communities. Bush plans to meet on Monday with Abdelaziz Hakim, leader of the United Iraqi Alliance, one of the two main parties in the majority Shiite governing alliance, and in January with Iraqi Vice President Tariq Hashimi, the head of the largest party representing Iraq's Sunni minority.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraq's most powerful Shiite leader rejected yesterday making major changes to the new constitution, diminishing Sunni Arab hopes of amending the charter to avoid being shut out of the nation's vast oil wealth. Sunnis were reluctant to sign on to the constitution last fall, fearing that provisions granting wide powers to autonomous regions would leave oil in the hands of Kurds in the north and Shiites in the south. Sunnis dominate in western, and much of northwestern and north-central Iraq, but the oil lies beneath Kurdistan and parts of southern Iraq that one day may be subsumed in a semi-independent region controlled by Shiites.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2003
NAJAF, Iraq - Amid grief-enraged crowds, police in this holy city arrested several suspects yesterday in the car-bomb attack that killed about 100 people, including a leading Shiite cleric, and shook Iraq to its core. Officials with the U.S.-led occupation authority said in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, that at least four of the suspects were believed to have ties to al-Qaida. The officials declined to offer details. If true, it would establish a critical link between the widely reported presence in Iraq of foreign subversives and a specific act of terrorism.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 2003
NAJAF, Iraq - A top Shiite leader and more than 90 other people were killed yesterday in a huge car bomb explosion outside a mosque in this Shiite holy city soon after Friday prayers. The explosion occurred moments after the Shiite leader, Ayatollah Mohammed Bakir al-Hakim, had left the site, which houses the tomb of Imam Ali and is considered the holiest shrine in Shiite Islam. Witnesses at the scene indicated the casualty toll could be far larger. But beyond the scale of human losses, the blast was particularly significant because of who its target apparently was. Al-Hakim was an important Shiite ally of the American occupying force, and his death will likely undermine the coalition's efforts to build stability in Iraq.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The car bombing that killed one of Iraq's most important spiritual leaders yesterday was met by an apparent political vacuum in the nation's capital, where the Iraqi and U.S. officials charting the country's future seemed unsure who should respond and how. Ayatollah Mohammed Bakir al-Hakim, a symbol of moderation in this restive land, was dead. Religious leaders called for blood and vengeance, and in some places the ayatollah's mourners took to the streets. Yet here in Baghdad, the Iraqi and U.S. officials charged with shepherding this country toward democratic rule went about their business as if little had changed.
NEWS
By Azadeh Moaveni and Azadeh Moaveni,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2003
NAJAF, Iraq - Ending a homecoming tour through southern Iraq, a leading Shiite Muslim arrived yesterday in his native town, Najaf, where he was greeted by a crowd of several thousand people eager to know what role he intends to play now that Saddam Hussein is gone. After 23 years in exile in Iran, Ayatollah Mohammed Bakr Hakim told the crowd that the new Iraq should be Islamic and democratic. Islam "achieves independence for us," he said, adding that the future of Iraq must be built around free elections.
NEWS
By Michael Slackman and Michael Slackman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran - Iraq's main opposition forces have begun coordinating their military efforts and would welcome U.S. air support in their bid to topple President Saddam Hussein, according to the leaders of one of the groups. Speaking from a guarded compound in Tehran, where he has been in exile for more than two decades, Shiite opposition leader Ayatollah Mohammed Bakr Hakim said last week that his organization opposes a full-blown U.S. invasion but supports the idea of a mission in which bombing paves the way for local forces to fight on the ground.
NEWS
By Maureen Fitzgerald and Maureen Fitzgerald,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 19, 2000
PENNSAUKEN, N.J. -- Several students rushed up to Joy Hakim as she entered their eighth-grade classroom at Phifer Middle School in Pennsauken. They thrust their history notebooks before her, asking for her autograph. One student lifted his textbook, "A History of U.S.," into the air, pointed to it, and gave her a thumbs-up sign. It was a novel day for these students of the electronic generation. The author of their history book -- the thing with printed words they lug to class and home in their backpacks -- was standing before them, like, live and in person.
NEWS
May 2, 2003
Albert A. Hakim, 66, an Iranian-born former Silicon Valley businessman who was a central figure in the Reagan administration's Iran-Contra scandal of the 1980s, died of a heart attack April 25 in Inchon, South Korea, where he moved a few years ago. Charged with five felony counts of conspiracy to divert funds illegally to the Nicaraguan contras and theft of government property, Hakim pleaded guilty in 1989 to a single misdemeanor count of making an...
NEWS
By Mohamad Bazzi and Mohamad Bazzi,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2003
TEHRAN, Iran - Before prison and torture, before life in exile, before surviving seven assassination attempts and the execution of dozens of his relatives, Ayatollah Muhammad Bakr al-Hakim wished only to become a Muslim theologian. By the age of 25, al-Hakim had achieved his goal and was teaching Islamic law in Baghdad. The choice he made to become a Shiite Muslim cleric - like his grandfather, father and older siblings - set him on a lifelong confrontation with the secular Iraqi regime and a life in which religion and politics were inextricably linked.
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