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SPORTS
November 18, 2012
Creating a distraction Keith Groller Morning Call Nice move by Andrew Bynum. With 76ers fans frustrated that the savior who was going to lead the franchise back to the days of Moses is out until January, Bynum has distracted them with his new 'do. After all, who can hate Captain Kangaroo? Bynum beware. Bizarre hair did nothing to soften Don King's image as someone who would shave his mother's head if he could make a buck. The worst? Troy Polamalu, because while others like Dennis Rodman needed their hair for hype, Polamalu has become more famous for his locks than his licks on the field.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 21, 2013
News of the closing of Simon "Cy" Avara's hair-styling academy - a Baltimore institution - arrives just as we enter the 50th anniversary of the start of the British Invasion of rock music. I make the connection because the British Invasion was as much about hair as it was about music, and one of the most notable things about Avara's career was his ability to adjust from crew cuts to mop tops. Not every barber was so flexible. First things first, regarding the British Invasion: A lot of people mark the start in early February 1964, when 73 million Americans tuned in to "The Ed Sullivan Show" to see the Beatles' debut on national television.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
There are two kinds of people in this country, and forget that blue-state, red-state thing. You're either for a mullet or against a mullet. What's a mullet? Do not mock us. Yes, a mullet is a spiny-finned, feeble-toothed fish, but we all know it's so much more. A mullet is a hairstyle characterized by the hair cut short in front and on the sides but kept long down the back. It's not a cutting-edge style. But recently, the mullet has re-emerged as a pop culture object of praise and derision.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
It's dyeable. It's bleachable. And it's highly sought after by thieves targeting shops in the Baltimore area and around the country. Unprocessed human hair - prized for providing women with long, flowing, natural-looking locks - has been swiped from half a dozen area beauty supply stores. The high-end hair, often sewn or glued in place to add length or volume, costs nearly $200 a bundle. Such steep prices have made the fashionable locks desirable among thieves , much like Nike Air Jordan Concords and Helly Hansen jackets.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder Tribune | December 8, 1996
Today's Topic is: Your HairstyleIs your hairstyle important?To answer that question, let's consider the starkly different career paths of two individuals: Albert Einstein and Tori Spelling.Tori Spelling is a top celebrity and highly successful television star, despite having the natural acting prowess of a Salad Shooter.Why?Because she always has a neat, modern hairstyle. Also, her father produces every show on television except the test pattern. But her hair is surely a factor.In contrast, Albert Einstein -- despite being a genius who not only discovered the Theory of Relativity ("E equals H2O")
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 30, 1999
It has been said that those who cannot remember history's bad hairstyles are condemned to repeat them. Or so claims the Internet magazine Charged.com (www.charged.com) in a humorous article on the top hairdos of all time.Leading the pack is "the emperor of all haircuts," the Julius Caesar, which scores points for practicality ("Your mom can give it to you using a salad bowl and a Flowbee") as well as versatility ("It looks just as sassy at the Roman orgy in December as it does at the execution on the Ides of March")
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | August 21, 1992
A funny thing happened to Tanya Carol on the way to work the other day. She was waiting for the No. 15 bus, glancing around Mount Holly Street, when she noticed something odd."I looked to the left and looked to the right and saw my haircut," says the 23-year-old magazine editor.Well not exactly her haircut. The short, layered bob that's become the style of the summer really belongs to Halle Berry, the fresh-faced actress in the Eddie Murphy movie, "Boomerang." But thanks to recent trips to the beauty salon, it also has turned up on Venel and Wanda and Melanie and . . .Not since Dorothy Hamill donned her bouncy wedge in the late '70s have so many women sought the same 'do. Simple and sexy, Ms. Berry's cut has caught on particularly among young black women, many of whom wouldn't mind if a few snips of the scissors made them look more like the model-turned-movie-star.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | October 7, 2005
It's baseball's postseason, so you know what that means for the discerning television sports viewer. Yes, it's the annual Jeanne Zelasko Hairstyle Watch. Hey, we kid. And welcome back to the postseason for the Fox studio host after the birth of her second child this summer. Actually, it's time to hang on every word uttered by game announcers and then unfairly parse them in this space. Or to talk about their hair. During Tuesday's St. Louis Cardinals-San Diego Padres game, ESPN's Joe Morgan tried to give a fresh take on the obvious point of not giving a team extra outs with shoddy defense.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 29, 1993
I'll tell you what Nancy and I can't talk about without a huge fight: her hair.Hair sounds like an innocuous subject, right? Like the weather? Something you can kick around without anyone getting all huffy and stomping out of the room? Hah! Don't try it. Really. It's just not worth it.Here's what I mean. Nancy comes home the other day, right? I hear the car pull in the driveway and I look out the window and there she is. And then I notice something that just chills me to the bone. She's had something done to her hair.
NEWS
By Susan Carpenter and Susan Carpenter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2000
It's a look worn by trendy teens, late boomers and shoe salesmen at Barneys -- a hairstyle that originated in England but is now making waves stateside. It's called the fin, and it may be coming to a salon near you, if it hasn't already washed up. What's the fin? "It's hair that's cut real short, and up on top it all gets pushed toward the center so it looks almost like a Mohawk," says David Petersen, co-owner of Rudy's Barbershop, a trend-setting salon in Los Angeles that does the cut. Gabrielle Hart, artistic director of Studio 1612 in Mount Washington, says the look has been steadily gaining popularity in the area for the past two months, although not everyone calls it "the fin."
SPORTS
November 18, 2012
Creating a distraction Keith Groller Morning Call Nice move by Andrew Bynum. With 76ers fans frustrated that the savior who was going to lead the franchise back to the days of Moses is out until January, Bynum has distracted them with his new 'do. After all, who can hate Captain Kangaroo? Bynum beware. Bizarre hair did nothing to soften Don King's image as someone who would shave his mother's head if he could make a buck. The worst? Troy Polamalu, because while others like Dennis Rodman needed their hair for hype, Polamalu has become more famous for his locks than his licks on the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Elly Jackson doesn't just channel hits from the '80s — she also has the hair. The 22-year-old lead singer of British electro-pop duo La Roux has one serious 'do. It's a quasi-quiff, a tidal wave of red hair that stands at rigid attention several inches above her scalp. More impressive still: It stays that way, even in the middle of a show. The La Roux 'do (it doesn't have an official name) will be on full display at Rams Head Live on Wednesday, when Jackson rolls through hits such as "Bulletproof," "In for the Kill" and "Quicksand.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Questions to AskUsNow!, the state's 24-hour, online library information service, run the gamut — from what to do when the pipes burst to where to find the latest fashion sensation and how to renew a book. Jim DeArmey, Baltimore County Library's information services coordinator, recently answered one contact who could not locate his insurer and another seeking photos of "emo" hairstyles. He was at the North Point library in Dundalk on Thursday to celebrate the program's 300,000th question, then spent the rest of the day tracking down a 25-year-old audiocassette of the popular novel "Love Story" to fulfill another AskUsNow!
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,special to the sun | October 8, 2006
On the first day of practice, C. Milton Wright cross country coach Donnie Mickey was thrilled to see that Steve Otradavec had gotten a haircut. It's not that Mickey thought Otradavec looked bad before he got a buzz cut. It's just that he had trouble telling Steve and his identical twin, Paul, apart. Mickey could use similar help with some other Mustang runners because this year's team has three sets of twins - making the team one to watch for several reasons. In addition to the Otradavecs, fraternal twins Nick and Tyler Baxter returned this season.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | October 7, 2005
It's baseball's postseason, so you know what that means for the discerning television sports viewer. Yes, it's the annual Jeanne Zelasko Hairstyle Watch. Hey, we kid. And welcome back to the postseason for the Fox studio host after the birth of her second child this summer. Actually, it's time to hang on every word uttered by game announcers and then unfairly parse them in this space. Or to talk about their hair. During Tuesday's St. Louis Cardinals-San Diego Padres game, ESPN's Joe Morgan tried to give a fresh take on the obvious point of not giving a team extra outs with shoddy defense.
NEWS
By Michael Hoffman and Michael Hoffman,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2005
Perched in a hairstyling chair, curlers and combs running through her dark tresses to form two sculpted braids, Brehms Lane Elementary School fifth-grader Miranda Maye was enjoying the fruits of classroom success. Enjoying a complimentary hairstyling session at Diamonds and Divas salon on Belair Road, Miranda was the latest pupil at the Northeast Baltimore school to cash in on an unconventional academic incentive called Smart is Beautiful. Salon owner Cherie Smith started the program last fall to reward a fifth-grader each month at the neighborhood school to encourage academic achievement.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | August 20, 1992
Looking back over the news stories that have appeared in the last month or so, several items stand out as candidates for the most-talked-about events currently on the American agenda:* The Mia Farrow-Woody Allen scandal.* The semi-tragic love story of Republican strategist Mary Matalin and Democratic strategist James Carville.* George Bush's alleged affair.* A reprise of Bill Clinton's alleged "skirt-chasing" and "draft dodging."* Hillary Clinton's alleged comparison of marriage to slavery.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | July 9, 2000
Step aside, brides. It's time for your attendants to get some attention. Tomorrow at Bibelot in Timonium, bridesmaids can dump those dowdy dresses from weddings past and even enter them in a contest with such categories as "dress with the biggest bows" and "most upholstery-like dress fabric." They'll also be treated to a fashion show of flattering bridesmaid frocks. The "Bridesmaid's Appreciation Bash," hosted by WPOC 93.1's Laurie DeYoung, is a party-cum-book signing for "The Bridesmaid's Survival Guide," a primer for playing second banana with style and dignity and most important, a sense of humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
There are two kinds of people in this country, and forget that blue-state, red-state thing. You're either for a mullet or against a mullet. What's a mullet? Do not mock us. Yes, a mullet is a spiny-finned, feeble-toothed fish, but we all know it's so much more. A mullet is a hairstyle characterized by the hair cut short in front and on the sides but kept long down the back. It's not a cutting-edge style. But recently, the mullet has re-emerged as a pop culture object of praise and derision.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
We like the coat, the Hermes Birkin bag, even the haircut. But Martha, are you sure that swept-away look is what you should be going for in federal court? After all, you've been charged with securities fraud and other unseemly crimes. Do you think obstruction of your left eye could be construed as obstruction of justice? It's all part of Martha Stewart's act, says Jerry Oppenheimer, who wrote Just Desserts: The Unauthorized Biography, a dishy account of the craft queen's life. "Martha's a great actress," he says.
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