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By Asahi News Service | November 20, 1992
TOKYO -- Men the world over seem to worry about receding hairlines and thin hair. Men with certain characteristics may have to worry more about losing their hair if results from a recent survey by a major Japanese cosmetics company is any indication.The survey conducted by Shiseido Co. this summer showed that men who are pessimistic, methodical and irritable are more likely to have thin hair.That connection was made based on street-side interviews of men in various parts of Tokyo on Aug. 31 and Sept.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Hairstylist Reggie Dowdy has found himself time and time again doing emergency hair repair on women whose tresses have been damaged by weaves and extensions. They come in with bald spots, also known as alopecia, and thinning hair caused by heavy weaves pulling at their scalps. Sometimes their real hair is so unkempt underneath the weave that it becomes matted and breaks off if they try to comb it. Or they break out in rashes because of the glue some stylists use to apply weaves. Dowdy doesn't oppose weaves and extensions — the hair practice makes up 50 percent of the business at his salon, Geometrics Hair Studio in Canton.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff | November 29, 1998
Several years ago, Sara Taggart started noticing she was losing a lot of hair whenever she took a shower. As she combed it, more hairs would end up in the sink. Then one day she noticed a patch of bare skin on the back of her head - a bald spot.Taggart, who manages a private estate in Baltimore County, was distraught. Her mother had lost a lot of her hair in her 60s and 70s, gradually becoming bald. But Taggart was only 53."I was afraid this was going to happen to me, too," she says. "My family started noticing I was losing my hair.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2008
The term "male pattern baldness" is familiar to most people. But many women, too, suffer from hair loss, says Lisa Earnest Ishii, assistant professor for facial plastic and reconstructive surgery in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's department of otolaryngology and neck surgery. Everyone "sheds" or loses some hair; what do doctors consider "hair loss" that could lead to thinning of the hair or balding? In general, hair loss greater than 100 hairs a day is considered abnormal. Otherwise, it is based upon what you see: Obviously, if you start to see the scalp showing through the hair, that is abnormal.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1997
When her long, brown hair began falling out in clumps, Carolynne Dorsey wore baseball caps or hats to cover the bald patches. And she cried a lot."It was devastating," said Dorsey, a mother of three who was diagnosed with alopecia, an unexplained, often permanent total or partial loss of hair. "You can't even imagine what that does to your self-esteem. I'd see a picture of me with hair and burst out crying. I didn't want my husband to look at me. My son told me, 'Don't come to school unless you have something on your head.
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By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | December 3, 1996
Beth Stein, a 39-year-old New Jersey advertising copywriter, began losing her hair at 19 -- presumably because of the genes that affect everyone in her family, male and female.Eventually, her hair became so thin it was hard to style in a way that covered her head."When this happens to people, especially to a woman, it's extremely emotionally distressing and socially crippling," she 11 says. "I tried a lot of phony treatments. I cried a lot. It was pretty devastating."Then, several months ago, she spotted an ad in the Yellow Pages for a New York doctor touting a new way to make hair grow.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
Bill Gilmore's head is ground zero for what is shaping up as one of the drug industry's hardest fought battles for the hearts -- and wallets -- of American men.The 43-year-old Baltimore resident is one of the estimated 40 million American men experiencing hair loss, and willing to pay good money for treatments to address it.On one side of the battle line is Pharmacia & Upjohn, the British drug giant, and its new Rogaine Extra Strength topical solution for...
NEWS
By Mia D. McNeil and Mia D. McNeil,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Loretta Bullen watched large sections of her silverish-gray hair tumble to the floor in April as she combed, brushed or even ran her fingers through it. "It all came out in two weeks because of the chemotherapy," said Bullen, 78, who is being treated for breast cancer. "I didn't want to look like a baldy. " Yesterday, Bullen, a Gardenville resident, and other cancer patients joyously cut a pink and white sheet cake to celebrate a new state law that will give cancer patients who have suffered hair loss a $350 break on buying wigs.
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By Patricia McAdam and Patricia McAdam,Medical Tribune News Service | August 31, 1994
African-American children are at increased risk of a relatively new form of ringworm of the scalp, which is more difficult to treat than a previous type that caused epidemics among white children in the 1940s and 1950s, a Washington expert warns.Currently about 90 percent of those infected with this form of ringworm -- called Trichophyton tonsurans (T. tonsurans) -- are African-American, according to Dr. Rebat M. Halder, chairman of the department of dermatology at Howard University College of Medicine.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1994
The way Dennis Fallon sees the Baltimore-Washington area, there are a lot of men out there needlessly suffering the bane of hair loss, baldness and wigs that just won't stay put.Mr. Fallon, and the company he works for, Kansas City, Mo.-based Apollo International, believe all that lost hair could be found money.That's why Apollo, which develops and markets non-surgical human hair additions and hair care products, recently opened its northeast headquarters in Columbia. The office will serve Apollo salons from Northern Virginia to Boston.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | July 17, 2008
You have written columns suggesting use of sunscreens with microparticles of zinc or titanium. I read that some scientists are concerned about nanoparticles found in products such as sunscreen. These particles are so tiny, they could get into places in our bodies that larger particles can't. No one knows how dangerous this might be, but some experts suggest we exercise caution and avoid nanotechnology in products such as sunscreen. Shouldn't you warn people about the danger? The Environmental Working Group is a collaborative group of scientists that first raised a red flag about nanoparticles in sunscreens.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | June 2, 2006
My husband and I want to start a family, so I take my temperature every day before I get out of bed. The record I keep lets us know when I have ovulated. The problem is the thermometer. It is an old-fashioned mercury thermometer we "borrowed" from his parents. He's very sweet about shaking it down and bringing it to me, but I am afraid he might break it. I worry that being exposed to mercury just before I get pregnant would be dangerous for the baby. He says other thermometers aren't as accurate.
NEWS
September 19, 2004
Baldness can be the result of heredity, certain medications or an underlying medical condition. The most common type - pattern baldness - accounts for about 95 percent of hair loss from the scalp and can be attributed to heredity. - Mayo Clinic
NEWS
By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 12, 2003
My 28-year-old son has a receding hairline. I hate to see him look middle-aged before he is in his 30s. Which baldness medicine works better, Rogaine or Prope-cia? Would they work better together than either alone? He can't afford either drug, but I could subsidize a six-month trial. A small study recently appeared in the Archives of Derma-tology comparing topical minoxidil (Rogaine) with oral finasteride (Propecia). Initially, minoxidil seemed more effective. But after two years, the two medications were "equally effective."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
After an automobile accident that fractured my sternum and ribs and resulted in a herniated disk, I searched diligently for pain relief. Conventional over-the-counter pain relievers all had side effects. Then I discovered that evening primrose oil provided the pain relief I needed, with no bad reactions. Additional benefits include stopping hair loss. Since then I have found that my two cats will stop eating to have their daily dose of evening primrose oil. Their fur is very beautiful, and they don't shed nearly as much as they did before.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2003
There's one comfort that Carole Ferguson wishes she could have provided for her mother before she died of breast cancer two years ago. "I regret that I did not know how to knit when she was sick. I was in the hospital so often with nothing to do with my hands," Ferguson said. She learned the craft months after her mother's death and developed such a strong love for it that she opened the Celtic Knot Yarn Shop on Ellicott City's Main Street earlier this year. Now, Ferguson knits "chemo caps" for patients receiving treatment for cancer.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2008
The term "male pattern baldness" is familiar to most people. But many women, too, suffer from hair loss, says Lisa Earnest Ishii, assistant professor for facial plastic and reconstructive surgery in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's department of otolaryngology and neck surgery. Everyone "sheds" or loses some hair; what do doctors consider "hair loss" that could lead to thinning of the hair or balding? In general, hair loss greater than 100 hairs a day is considered abnormal. Otherwise, it is based upon what you see: Obviously, if you start to see the scalp showing through the hair, that is abnormal.
NEWS
September 19, 2004
Baldness can be the result of heredity, certain medications or an underlying medical condition. The most common type - pattern baldness - accounts for about 95 percent of hair loss from the scalp and can be attributed to heredity. - Mayo Clinic
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 24, 2002
My mother has Alzheimer's disease and hasn't spoken coherently in more than two years. She fell and broke her hip and was given a shot for pain. Like magic, she became lucid and responsive. This continued after surgery for several days. We had a hard time convincing the hospital that she actually had Alzheimer's, but after several days she gradually slipped back into the mists and fogs of her brain. I wish researchers would investigate this amazing phenomenon. Your experience is not unique.
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