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NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
HAIFA, Israel -- Hezbollah militants launched a barrage of rockets at Israel's third-largest city yesterday, scoring a direct hit with a new, longer-range missile on a railway maintenance building filled with workers, killing eight people, wounding two dozen others and quickly bringing an Israeli counterattack. Israeli warplanes carried out a round of airstrikes on southwestern Beirut, targeting Hezbollah headquarters, and on a Lebanese civil defense building in the southern port city of Tyre, killing about 45 people and wounding more than 100 others, according to wire service reports from southern Lebanon.
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NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 26, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraq's Shiite prime minister exchanged heated words with a Sunni lawmaker over the country's new security plan yesterday, leading parliament to temporarily suspend debate and Iraqi television to abort its coverage. The argument underscored the deep divides that have bedeviled attempts to quell Iraq's deadly sectarian conflict. As the legislators debated, the violence continued, with more than 80 Iraqis and at least one U.S. soldier killed in a string of bombings and other attacks.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 3, 2001
JERUSALEM - In the second deadly terror attack of the weekend, a Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up yesterday in a packed bus in northern Israel, killing 15 more people and stunning the nation. The noontime explosion that ripped the red-and-white bus apart in the Mediterranean port city of Haifa was the latest in a wave of terror attacks that have killed 33 Israelis since Nov. 26, the day a new U.S. peace envoy arrived to hammer out a cease-fire. Efforts to coax both sides to the negotiating table have produced no tangible results, with extremist Palestinian groups dictating the agenda with suicide bombers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 25, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- In the battle for Baghdad, Haifa Street has changed hands so often that it has taken on the feel of a no man's land, the deadly space between opposing trenches. As American and Iraqi troops poured in yesterday, the street showed why it is such a sensitive gauge of an urban conflict marked by front lines that melt into confusion, enemies with no clear identity and allies who disappear or do not show up at all. In a miniature version of the troop increase that the United States hopes will secure the city, American soldiers and armored vehicles raced onto Haifa Street before dawn to dislodge Sunni insurgents and Shiite militias that have been battling for a stretch of ragged slums and mostly abandoned high-rises.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 7, 2003
HAIFA, Israel - The files were blue and pink, one for a boy, the other for a girl, with the photos of each child stapled to the front. They were strewn on a principal's desk, nearly lost amid the clutter that included a eulogy. The binders were for eighth-grade classmates Yuval Mendelevich, 13, and Abigail Litle, 14, who attended the Reali School in this seaside city in northern Israel. They were among 15 passengers killed Wednesday when a Palestinian suicide bomber blew up a bus, shattering Haifa's sense of relative security.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | December 23, 1990
HAIFA, Israel -- At least 19 U.S. sailors drowned yesterday when an Israeli ferry returning them to the aircraft carrier Saratoga from shore sank within sight of the carrier, which was at anchor in Haifa's harbor.More than two dozen other sailors on the ferry, all of them returning from shore leave, were injured and hospitalized suffering from exposure and the effects of swallowing sea water in what is by far the worst U.S. military accident since the beginning of the buildup of forces against Iraq.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2006
HAIFA, Israel -- The first rocket to hit this bayside city from southern Lebanon has confirmed worries in Israel that Hezbollah has rockets that can hit targets deep in their nation, and that the militant group is prepared to use them. A length of police tape was the only sign yesterday of where a rocket slammed into a hill here, about 20 miles from the Lebanese border, a night earlier. The strike against Israel's third-largest city caused no injuries, but officials said it made clear the worrisome improvement in the range of rockets that Hezbollah guerrillas have at their disposal.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | December 24, 1990
JERUSALEM -- Divers found the body of another U.S. sailor yesterday in the wreckage of a ferry that sank Saturday in the port of Haifa, raising the accident's death toll to 20, with another sailor missing.Three investigations were under way to determine why the boat sank while it was carrying about 100 sailors from shore to the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga. The ferry, the Tovia, sank in about 60 feet of water after waves whipped by high winds crashed onto its stern, when it was within sight of the carrier.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | June 24, 2001
The Haifa Festival Orchestra, a 15-member string ensemble from Israel led by Ada Pelleg, is a featured attraction of the Columbia Festival of the Arts today and tomorrow. Both programs feature Jin Ta, winner of the Haifa International Flute Festival. He will perform a flute concerto from the 18th century by Johann Joachim Quantz and "Improvisation of the Herdsman" for flute and string orchestra by contemporary Syrian composer Nuri El-Ruheibany during this evening's concert; also on the bill are a divertimento by Mozart and Tchaikovsky's "Serenade for Strings."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 25, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Saudi Arabia scrambled over the weekend to defuse a new crisis in its relations with the United States after the disclosure of a money trail leading indirectly from the Saudi Embassy to a man who befriended two Sept. 11 hijackers. Saudi sources acknowledged that the embassy; the ambassador, Prince Bandar bin Sultan; and his wife, Princess Haifa al-Faisal, together provided about $130,000 in what they called charitable donations over a four-year period to Majida Ibrahim Ahmad al-Dweikat, who needed medical treatment.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 2007
BAGHDAD, IRAQ -- In fierce, daylong fighting, 1,000 American and Iraqi troops assisted by U.S. attack helicopters and planes battled gunmen in a Sunni Arab neighborhood yesterday, killing at least 51 militants, Iraqi officials said. The offensive, the heaviest fighting in the capital in months, came in response to a buildup of insurgents in the Haifa Street neighborhood adjacent to the heavily fortified Green Zone government complex. Sunni gunmen had erected fake checkpoints in recent days, residents said, and in one case, pulled passengers from a minibus, killing them and stringing their bodies from electricity poles.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
HAIFA, Israel -- Hezbollah militants launched a barrage of rockets at Israel's third-largest city yesterday, scoring a direct hit with a new, longer-range missile on a railway maintenance building filled with workers, killing eight people, wounding two dozen others and quickly bringing an Israeli counterattack. Israeli warplanes carried out a round of airstrikes on southwestern Beirut, targeting Hezbollah headquarters, and on a Lebanese civil defense building in the southern port city of Tyre, killing about 45 people and wounding more than 100 others, according to wire service reports from southern Lebanon.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2006
HAIFA, Israel -- The first rocket to hit this bayside city from southern Lebanon has confirmed worries in Israel that Hezbollah has rockets that can hit targets deep in their nation, and that the militant group is prepared to use them. A length of police tape was the only sign yesterday of where a rocket slammed into a hill here, about 20 miles from the Lebanese border, a night earlier. The strike against Israel's third-largest city caused no injuries, but officials said it made clear the worrisome improvement in the range of rockets that Hezbollah guerrillas have at their disposal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
Samuel Iwry, one of the world's leading Hebrew scholars and an authority on the Dead Sea Scrolls, died of a stroke Saturday at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 93. Dr. Iwry was born and raised in Bialystok, Poland. He was a direct descendant of Rebbe Israel Baal Shem Tov, who lived from 1700 to 1760 and was founder of Judaism's Hasidic Movement. He graduated from Warsaw University, the Higher Institute for Judaic Studies and the Teachers College of Wilno, Poland. After the Nazi invasion in 1939, he wandered from Warsaw to Moscow to Tokyo, and finally to Shanghai.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 7, 2004
HAIFA, Israel - The Uzi submachine gun, the weapon that became a trademark of Israel's firearms industry and a symbol of bravado on battlefields and movie screens, is becoming a relic within the institution that introduced the gun nearly a half-century ago: the Israeli army. Front-line soldiers abandoned the Uzi two decades ago for the American M-16. This year, the army's special forces stopped training with the Uzi and have turned to more modern firearms. Israel Military Industries, a for-profit company owned and run by the Israeli Defense Ministry, plans to continue manufacturing and selling the Uzi, and the gun's official end as an army mainstay came without notice or mourning.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 2003
JERUSALEM - Nineteen people were killed and dozens more injured when a female Palestinian suicide bomber detonated explosives yesterday in a packed seaside restaurant in the northern Israeli port city of Haifa, a community that is known for its coexistence of Jews and Arabs. The blast, which occurred the day before the start of the solemn Yom Kippur holiday, destroyed the inside of the Maxim restaurant and raised the prospect that Israel might exile Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, a threat the government made after a pair of attacks killed 15 people Sept.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 25, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- In the battle for Baghdad, Haifa Street has changed hands so often that it has taken on the feel of a no man's land, the deadly space between opposing trenches. As American and Iraqi troops poured in yesterday, the street showed why it is such a sensitive gauge of an urban conflict marked by front lines that melt into confusion, enemies with no clear identity and allies who disappear or do not show up at all. In a miniature version of the troop increase that the United States hopes will secure the city, American soldiers and armored vehicles raced onto Haifa Street before dawn to dislodge Sunni insurgents and Shiite militias that have been battling for a stretch of ragged slums and mostly abandoned high-rises.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 6, 2003
JERUSALEM - A Palestinian suicide bomber detonated a bomb yesterday aboard a crowded bus in the northern Israeli city of Haifa, killing at least 15 people and injuring more than 40 others in an explosion that reduced the bus to a roofless tangle of metal and broken glass. The force of the blast lifted the bus into the air, felled palm trees and broke windows in nearby homes. With medics slowed by a crush of traffic, witnesses rushed to help people trapped in the smoldering ruins and lying on the pavement.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 7, 2003
HAIFA, Israel - The files were blue and pink, one for a boy, the other for a girl, with the photos of each child stapled to the front. They were strewn on a principal's desk, nearly lost amid the clutter that included a eulogy. The binders were for eighth-grade classmates Yuval Mendelevich, 13, and Abigail Litle, 14, who attended the Reali School in this seaside city in northern Israel. They were among 15 passengers killed Wednesday when a Palestinian suicide bomber blew up a bus, shattering Haifa's sense of relative security.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 6, 2003
JERUSALEM - A Palestinian suicide bomber detonated a bomb yesterday aboard a crowded bus in the northern Israeli city of Haifa, killing at least 15 people and injuring more than 40 others in an explosion that reduced the bus to a roofless tangle of metal and broken glass. The force of the blast lifted the bus into the air, felled palm trees and broke windows in nearby homes. With medics slowed by a crush of traffic, witnesses rushed to help people trapped in the smoldering ruins and lying on the pavement.
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