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By DAN FESPERMAN | April 10, 1994
Vienna. -- The cameras are rolling and the pens are scribbling, all because the --ing man who aspires to be chancellor of Austria, Joerg Haider, has at last moved onto his most popular subject.It's time to bash some foreigners."A Lebanese man convicted 50 times for breaking and entering and other offenses wasn't supposed to re-enter Austria until the year 2047," Mr. Haider says, "but he keeps coming back. There was a Bulgarian caught red-handed, and yet he still receives social benefits. . . . A Romanian who was convicted gets a computer and 40,000 Austrian schillings [about $3,600]
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 5, 2012
Exploratory surgery isn't necessary on most abdominal gunshot and stabbing victims, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins . Surgery increases the risk of complications, researchers said. “Managing gunshot and stab wounds without exploratory surgery prevents complications, saves money and keeps 80 percent of patients from getting operations that end up being unnecessary,” said trauma surgeon Dr. Adil H. Haider, an associate professor of surgery, anesthesiology and critical care medicine and senior author of the study, in a statement.
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NEWS
February 5, 2000
NOW that Austria has a government embracing extremist xenophobes in coalition with traditional conservatives, statesmen of Europe are eating half their words. Joerg Haider, an anti-immigrant demagogue who sounds like a neo-Nazi some of the time, led his Freedom Party to second place in last October's election. Despite the distaste of Austrian President Thomas Klestil, parliamentary democracy gave him no options. The new regime is headed by a reasonable conservative, Wolfgang Schuessel, with Mr. Haider tactfully staying out. The two repudiated Austria's Nazi heritage before the swearing-in, however insincerely on Mr. Haider's part.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | May 13, 2008
Carlos Santay was smiling while paying a gas station attendant as he prepared to return home to drive his wife to the hospital to give birth to their first child. "He looked happy," said Munir Haider, the clerk at the Catonsville gas station where the 19-year-old Santay was fatally stabbed Saturday evening in what police said appeared to be a botched robbery. Santay's wife and newborn son remained at Howard County General Hospital yesterday, while police and friends of the young widow pleaded for public help in identifying the killer.
NEWS
By MARK SIMON | February 11, 2000
On a rainy night in late September, I climbed into a taxi in Berlin, heading for the airport. Noting my camera equipment, the young, skinhead driver, in his de rigeur black, asked me where I was headed. "Vienna, for the election," I replied. "Will you see Haider?" he wanted to know. "I think so," I replied. "Isn't he great?" he asked. I did get to meet the extreme right-wing politician Joerg Haider, in the baroque Austrian capital. He is smart, cool, photogenic, a chameleon, a master of making provocative, racist, even revisionist statements and, later, half-heartedly reversing himself, as if they were small, inconsequential errors.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan, Anica Butler and Siobhan Gorman and Matthew Dolan, Anica Butler and Siobhan Gorman,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
A Pakistani citizen whose name surfaced in a terrorism-related database after he was picked up in a routine traffic stop in Baltimore County will face federal charges this morning of selling fake immigration documents, officials said. Muhammad Asif Haider, 27, of New York City remained in federal custody yesterday awaiting his hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. The arrest late Sunday night marked the second time in less than a week that federal authorities have detained suspects from the Baltimore region as part of their anti-terrorism efforts.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 5, 2012
Exploratory surgery isn't necessary on most abdominal gunshot and stabbing victims, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins . Surgery increases the risk of complications, researchers said. “Managing gunshot and stab wounds without exploratory surgery prevents complications, saves money and keeps 80 percent of patients from getting operations that end up being unnecessary,” said trauma surgeon Dr. Adil H. Haider, an associate professor of surgery, anesthesiology and critical care medicine and senior author of the study, in a statement.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | May 13, 2008
Carlos Santay was smiling while paying a gas station attendant as he prepared to return home to drive his wife to the hospital to give birth to their first child. "He looked happy," said Munir Haider, the clerk at the Catonsville gas station where the 19-year-old Santay was fatally stabbed Saturday evening in what police said appeared to be a botched robbery. Santay's wife and newborn son remained at Howard County General Hospital yesterday, while police and friends of the young widow pleaded for public help in identifying the killer.
TOPIC
By Hans Knight | August 27, 2000
Recently I visited Vienna, my old hometown, and it warmed my heart that the City of Dreams still is a feast for the senses. Along the pulsing Kaertnerstrasse, cheery throngs of tourists and often corpulent natives vainly strive to resist the unbroken string of cafes and restaurants bursting with schnitzels and Sacher tortes. In the shadow of St. Stephen's Cathedral, whose catacombs house thousands of anonymous bones along with sundry internal organs, tightly sealed, of kaisers and dukes, life goes full blast.
NEWS
By Yossi Klein Halevi | February 8, 2000
WHILE MUCH OF the international community prepares to isolate Austria for including the far-right Freedom Party in its next government, the greatest offender to the memory of the Holocaust has quietly evaded punishment. Last week, Syria became the world's first Holocaust-denier state. An editorial in the official Damascus newspaper, Tishreen -- the leading mouthpiece of Syrian dictator Hafez el Assad -- proclaimed that Zionists "created the Holocaust myth to blackmail the world and terrorize its intellectuals and politicians."
NEWS
August 10, 2005
BALTIMORE Man on watch list to stay in custody until transfer A Pakistani man whose name is listed in a terrorism-related database will remain in custody until his transfer to New York, a federal court judge in Baltimore ruled yesterday. Muhammad Asif Haider, 27, of New York City was arrested Sunday on immigration fraud charges after a traffic stop in Baltimore County. Yesterday in U.S. District Court, his defense attorney, assistant federal public defender Jeffrey E. Risberg, did not object to prosecutors' request to hold Haider until he appears in court in New York, where the charges against him were filed.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan, Anica Butler and Siobhan Gorman and Matthew Dolan, Anica Butler and Siobhan Gorman,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
A Pakistani citizen whose name surfaced in a terrorism-related database after he was picked up in a routine traffic stop in Baltimore County will face federal charges this morning of selling fake immigration documents, officials said. Muhammad Asif Haider, 27, of New York City remained in federal custody yesterday awaiting his hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. The arrest late Sunday night marked the second time in less than a week that federal authorities have detained suspects from the Baltimore region as part of their anti-terrorism efforts.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Doug Donovan and Laura Vozzella and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
Baltimore's mayor stood firmly behind his top cop last week, as the public learned that police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark had been accused in past domestic disputes in addition to one alleged in May. Yesterday, Martin O'Malley showed him the door. As the city's fourth commissioner in five years begins work, the mayor's friends and political foes debate what this episode - coming on top of one police chief who lasted just 57 days and another now in federal prison - says about O'Malley's judgment and management style.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Pim Fortuyn was not merely the leader of a far-right political party in the Netherlands before he was assassinated last week. He was a political rock star, a gay man who was open about his sexuality and a public figure who enjoyed the flamboyant gesture. ("I will borrow that handbag from Margaret Thatcher, bang it on the table, and say, `I want my money back!'" he once replied famously to a question about bloated government.) He was a spaniel-loving eccentric who favored glittery clubs, chauffeur-driven luxury cars and suits as sharp as his rhetoric.
TOPIC
By Hans Knight | August 27, 2000
Recently I visited Vienna, my old hometown, and it warmed my heart that the City of Dreams still is a feast for the senses. Along the pulsing Kaertnerstrasse, cheery throngs of tourists and often corpulent natives vainly strive to resist the unbroken string of cafes and restaurants bursting with schnitzels and Sacher tortes. In the shadow of St. Stephen's Cathedral, whose catacombs house thousands of anonymous bones along with sundry internal organs, tightly sealed, of kaisers and dukes, life goes full blast.
TOPIC
By C. Fraser Smith | July 2, 2000
FOR ANNE SCHWAB, memory has been a curse - and a blessing. A Holocaust survivor, she remembers German thugs slamming into her house on Kristalnacht, the night of shattered glass and broken lives, a murderous spree unleashed by Hitler. She remembers Christina, the Catholic cleaning lady, getting in front of the intruders. "You're going to have to step on me first," the woman said. They did, shoving Christina aside and taking Anne's father, Rudolf, to the concentration camp called Buchenwald.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Pim Fortuyn was not merely the leader of a far-right political party in the Netherlands before he was assassinated last week. He was a political rock star, a gay man who was open about his sexuality and a public figure who enjoyed the flamboyant gesture. ("I will borrow that handbag from Margaret Thatcher, bang it on the table, and say, `I want my money back!'" he once replied famously to a question about bloated government.) He was a spaniel-loving eccentric who favored glittery clubs, chauffeur-driven luxury cars and suits as sharp as his rhetoric.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Doug Donovan and Laura Vozzella and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
Baltimore's mayor stood firmly behind his top cop last week, as the public learned that police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark had been accused in past domestic disputes in addition to one alleged in May. Yesterday, Martin O'Malley showed him the door. As the city's fourth commissioner in five years begins work, the mayor's friends and political foes debate what this episode - coming on top of one police chief who lasted just 57 days and another now in federal prison - says about O'Malley's judgment and management style.
NEWS
March 1, 2000
ISOLATING Austria within the European Union, for including the xenophobic Freedom Party in government, may boomerang. It could provoke the national self-pity needed to propel that party's playful demagogic leader, Joerg Haider, into the chancellorship, or prime ministry, of Austria. But the policy is having a positive effect in EU countries, isolating ultra-nationalist parties in France, Belgium and Germany. There is no sign that the ostracism of Austria's ambassadors will end just because Mr. Haider stepped down as the Freedom Party's leader.
TOPIC
By Hans Knight | February 13, 2000
HERE WE go again. Once more, the hills of Austria are alive with the sound of music, but the tunes are a far cry from those that came from the lovely throat of Julie Andrews in the fairy-tale movie of yore. Just when we thought that Austria was recovering from the black eye inflicted on its gorgeous face by the duplicitous Kurt Waldheim, along comes a ruggedly handsome, fast-skiing politician named Joerg Haider with a smashing right cross to the nose. His Freedom Party -- and isn't it hilariously ironic that rightist extremists always include "freedom" in their moniker?
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