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By Janell Sutherland | April 29, 2013
This episode includes poetry and haggis. Actually, poetry and haggis together! A little haggis always makes the poetry go down easier, don't you think? Let's kick things off with ... Airport Shenanigans of Mistaken Euphoria You know that feeling you get when you get the last tickets to Scotland on an earlier flight, and your least favorite teams are stuck on a flight three hours later? You do a little dance, skip around, maybe plan to do some sightseeing with all that free time you'll be enjoying?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | April 29, 2013
This episode includes poetry and haggis. Actually, poetry and haggis together! A little haggis always makes the poetry go down easier, don't you think? Let's kick things off with ... Airport Shenanigans of Mistaken Euphoria You know that feeling you get when you get the last tickets to Scotland on an earlier flight, and your least favorite teams are stuck on a flight three hours later? You do a little dance, skip around, maybe plan to do some sightseeing with all that free time you'll be enjoying?
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 15, 2004
YOU HAVE GOT to have a strong stomach, a couple of them, to eat haggis. I discovered this about two weeks ago when I had my first taste of haggis during a delightful evening at the Holiday Inn Select in Timonium. One stomach was provided by a lamb and served as the vessel, or casing, that the haggis - a mixture of sheep parts, oatmeal, onions and spices - was cooked in. The other strong stomach belonged to any diner who devoured the fabled, if grayish, fare. There was no shortage of zealous eaters the other night as members of Maryland-area clans gathered.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2009
Moon: Living Abroad in Canada Avalon Travel, $19.95 It seems that quite a few Americans consider Canada the 51st state. Author Carolyn B. Heller aims to put that idea to rest. Although the United States and Canada have much in common, Heller is quick to point out that Canada has its own distinctive culture with its own customs, languages and idiosyncrasies. Canada has slightly more than 33 million people, but nearly three-quarters of them live within 100 miles of the U.S. border. She discusses housing, the Canadian health system, employment and finance, while offering suggestions on prime living locations.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
With a plaid kilt wrapped around his waist and a primal scream on his lips, Tim Ross sent a 16 1/2 -pound stone sailing through the air. Later came a hammer, and then a 16-foot log that weighed more than 100 pounds. Watching on the grassy field, several burly men clapped appreciatively. "I don't know what it is about throwing," said Ross, an environmental biologist from Federalsburg. "It just feels good." Ross and about 30 other men spent yesterday grunting and heaving at the Anne Arundel Scottish Highland Games.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
On September 21, 2003 EDITHWORTHINGTON JENKINS beloved wife of the late Frederick Henry Jenkins; dear mother of Frederick H. Jr. and Edwin Lee Jenkins and Nancy Jenkins Haggis; dear grandmother of Lara, Frederick H. III, Brian and Christine Jenkins; devoted sister of Mildred Austin. Friends may call at the Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home, Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook) on Friday 4 to 7 p.m. A funeral service will be held Saturday 11 a.m. at Chestnut Grove Presbyterian Church. Interment in adjoining cemetery.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2009
Moon: Living Abroad in Canada Avalon Travel, $19.95 It seems that quite a few Americans consider Canada the 51st state. Author Carolyn B. Heller aims to put that idea to rest. Although the United States and Canada have much in common, Heller is quick to point out that Canada has its own distinctive culture with its own customs, languages and idiosyncrasies. Canada has slightly more than 33 million people, but nearly three-quarters of them live within 100 miles of the U.S. border. She discusses housing, the Canadian health system, employment and finance, while offering suggestions on prime living locations.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 6, 2005
Going to Crash is like watching competing cheerleaders flip signboards. All the people in it declare their prejudices and allegiances in big, bold patterns; a few of them change stripes midway through for a fake kaleidoscope effect. New York critics have anointed Crash in advance as the Second Coming, but it's just another over-ambitious first movie. Paul Haggis, who did the clumsy screenplay for Million Dollar Baby, wrote the original script with Bobby Moresco and makes his directorial debut with this L.A. story of roughly 16 major characters who embody the racial tensions of contemporary American urban life.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 15, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- He is the golfer Americans love to hate. He is an annoying mix of pouty and brash. Even when Colin Montgomerie breaks into a smile, it looks as if the edges of his mouth are fighting the permanent frown that seems creased into his face. Yet there would be no better winner at this week's British Open at Carnoustie than Montgomerie. The site of the dour Scot holding the Claret Jug on his native soil might even warm the heart of his harshest detractors.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 6, 2006
Today's Hollywood sounded as puffed-up and platitudinous as Old Hollywood through much of the 78th annual Academy Awards. Cathy Schulman, co-producer of the upset winner, Crash, thanked everyone who embraced the movie's message of "love, tolerance and truth" - high-flown spin on a movie about racism that was pretty much a two-hour hatefest. Crash director/co-writer/co-producer Paul Haggis (who won best original script) loosely quoted Bertolt Brecht that "art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 21, 2007
In the Valley of Elah is too inept and diffuse to be a howl against the war in Iraq. At best, it is a manly whimper. Written and directed with a two-by-four by that proponent of earnest overstatement Paul Haggis (Crash), it stars Tommy Lee Jones as a former military policeman who retunes his old cop reflexes when his son, back from Iraq, is hideously murdered. Charlize Theron plays the small-town police detective who helps him crack the case after he convinces her that the crime took place on public, not military, grounds.
FEATURES
By John Horn and John Horn,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 2006
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-- --Most screenwriters prefer working in a quiet office. Some seek out coffee shops, while others hole up in hotel rooms. Paul Haggis didn't have the time for any of that - he was typing on a laptop in the passenger seat of a van bounding down Interstate 25 at 70 mph. The creative voice behind the past two best picture winners - he wrote Million Dollar Baby and co-wrote and directed Crash - Haggis also shares screenplay credit on...
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 6, 2006
Today's Hollywood sounded as puffed-up and platitudinous as Old Hollywood through much of the 78th annual Academy Awards. Cathy Schulman, co-producer of the upset winner, Crash, thanked everyone who embraced the movie's message of "love, tolerance and truth" - high-flown spin on a movie about racism that was pretty much a two-hour hatefest. Crash director/co-writer/co-producer Paul Haggis (who won best original script) loosely quoted Bertolt Brecht that "art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 6, 2005
Going to Crash is like watching competing cheerleaders flip signboards. All the people in it declare their prejudices and allegiances in big, bold patterns; a few of them change stripes midway through for a fake kaleidoscope effect. New York critics have anointed Crash in advance as the Second Coming, but it's just another over-ambitious first movie. Paul Haggis, who did the clumsy screenplay for Million Dollar Baby, wrote the original script with Bobby Moresco and makes his directorial debut with this L.A. story of roughly 16 major characters who embody the racial tensions of contemporary American urban life.
FEATURES
By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2005
It's always nice to be an overnight sensation, even if you're bald and old enough to have been inspired to become a fashion photographer after seeing Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow-Up in the 1960s. Just ask Paul Haggis, the Canadian-born writer-director who's so hot right now that he has Steven Spielberg pitching him story ideas and Dustin Hoffman taking him to lunch. What makes the 52-year-old's success so satisfying is that he earned it the hard way. After years of toiling in relative obscurity in TV, where he was beloved by critics but spurned by audiences - the show he considers his greatest achievement, EZ Streets, was canceled the week it debuted - he has suddenly emerged as Hollywood's go-to guy for dark, difficult material.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 15, 2004
YOU HAVE GOT to have a strong stomach, a couple of them, to eat haggis. I discovered this about two weeks ago when I had my first taste of haggis during a delightful evening at the Holiday Inn Select in Timonium. One stomach was provided by a lamb and served as the vessel, or casing, that the haggis - a mixture of sheep parts, oatmeal, onions and spices - was cooked in. The other strong stomach belonged to any diner who devoured the fabled, if grayish, fare. There was no shortage of zealous eaters the other night as members of Maryland-area clans gathered.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | August 14, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- How far behind is too far? Well, six shots on the final day of a major championship should be quite enough, but not for Steve Elkington, not yesterday, not at the tough Riviera Country Club, not in the PGA Championship.But by the time the late afternoon sun was filtering through the eucalyptus trees, there was Elkington hoisting the silver trophy as the newest and, let's be honest, most surprising PGA champion.Elkington, a 32-year-old Australian who lives in Houston, shot a closing-round 64, came from six shots down to pass Ernie Els, then birdied the first playoff hole to defeat hard-luck Colin Montgomerie of Scotland and claim the first major title of his nine-year career.
FEATURES
By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2005
It's always nice to be an overnight sensation, even if you're bald and old enough to have been inspired to become a fashion photographer after seeing Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow-Up in the 1960s. Just ask Paul Haggis, the Canadian-born writer-director who's so hot right now that he has Steven Spielberg pitching him story ideas and Dustin Hoffman taking him to lunch. What makes the 52-year-old's success so satisfying is that he earned it the hard way. After years of toiling in relative obscurity in TV, where he was beloved by critics but spurned by audiences - the show he considers his greatest achievement, EZ Streets, was canceled the week it debuted - he has suddenly emerged as Hollywood's go-to guy for dark, difficult material.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
With a plaid kilt wrapped around his waist and a primal scream on his lips, Tim Ross sent a 16 1/2 -pound stone sailing through the air. Later came a hammer, and then a 16-foot log that weighed more than 100 pounds. Watching on the grassy field, several burly men clapped appreciatively. "I don't know what it is about throwing," said Ross, an environmental biologist from Federalsburg. "It just feels good." Ross and about 30 other men spent yesterday grunting and heaving at the Anne Arundel Scottish Highland Games.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
On September 21, 2003 EDITHWORTHINGTON JENKINS beloved wife of the late Frederick Henry Jenkins; dear mother of Frederick H. Jr. and Edwin Lee Jenkins and Nancy Jenkins Haggis; dear grandmother of Lara, Frederick H. III, Brian and Christine Jenkins; devoted sister of Mildred Austin. Friends may call at the Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home, Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook) on Friday 4 to 7 p.m. A funeral service will be held Saturday 11 a.m. at Chestnut Grove Presbyterian Church. Interment in adjoining cemetery.
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