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By Marty McGee ......C | May 9, 1991
The Maryland Racing Commission unanimously upheld yesterday a 15-day suspension for veteran trainer Charlie Hadry. In so doing, the commission upheld the absolute-insurer rule that has become critical in deciding cases involving drug violations in Maryland.Hadry was suspended for 15 days by the stewards after one of his runners, Subtle Step, tested positive for a trace amount of cocaine after winning a maiden-claiming race at Pimlico Race Course March 15. Hadry appealed the penalty pending yesterday's hearing, which was held at Pimlico.
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April 9, 2012
In March, APG Federal Credit Union honored Kimberly D. Hadry, assistant manager, Dealer Direct, with an award presentation for 25 years of dedicated service to the credit union. In 1987, Hadry was hired as a teller at APGFCU's Aberdeen Proving Ground Branch and was later promoted to member service representative. Since then, she has held positions as Visa representative and loan officer. In her current role as assistant manager, Dealer Direct, Hadry is responsible for the supervision and coordination of the Dealer Direct Department and Centralized Disbursal, including member service lending functions.
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SPORTS
By Bill Free | September 9, 1991
Julie Krone, an old friend, bailed trainer Charlie "Junior" Hadry out yesterday when another friend, Chris Antley, let Hadry down.Krone was a late replacement for Antley aboard Missy White Oak, a 43-1 long shot, in the $100,000 Chesapeake Bay Maryland Lassie sixth race. She rode the 2-year-old filly to a stunning Maryland Million victory at Pimlico Race Course.Krone hung back in fourth and third places early before coming on to win by a half-length over Come On Spring.Missy White Oak paid $89 to win over six furlongs.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
Cherokee's Boy has had a successful summer, winning three stakes races while continuing to train under Gary Capuano, and as nine horses prepared to run in yesterday's $100,000 Charles H. Hadry Stakes at Laurel Park, the former Preakness competitor looked ready to run. "He's had a good career," said Capuano of the 5-year-old. "And he's a real consistent horse, always on or near the lead." Yesterday, Cherokee's Boy was again near the lead for most of the 1 1/16-mile race, but it is the unexpected that makes a horse race interesting, and Honorable Man made things a little too interesting for the rest of the Hadry field.
SPORTS
By Pete Bielski and Pete Bielski,Special to The Sun | March 19, 1995
Trainer Charles Hadry chose to chat in the racing office rather than watch yesterday's Goss L. Stryker Stakes from his box seat.But the veteran trainer was still all smiles after his 3-year-old, Private Faith, prevailed in the seven-furlong stakes race for Maryland-breds. Hadry, also the horse's owner, earned the $36,000 winner's share. Favored Centurian was second, a head behind. Shimmering Prince was third.It was the second win a row and third in 12 career starts for Private Faith, a son of Private Terms, the horse that took Hadry to the Kentucky Derby in 1988, and that probably made Hadry less than excited about yesterday's stakes race.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee | October 10, 1991
The Maryland Racing Commission yesterday gave preliminaryapproval to amendments that will expand the discretionary powers of the stewards, harness judges and commission in cases of drug and rules infractions.If the measures gain final commission approval -- which could happen by early next year -- the officials would have more latitude inmeting penalties.Another feature of the proposals is that the stewards' and judges' maximum fine will rise from $500 to $2,500.In appeals of stewards' or judges' decisions to the commission, the same discretionary powers also may apply to the panel.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | May 9, 1991
Three years ago Charlie Hadry epitomized the best in Maryland racing, winning the Wood Memorial in track record time with Private Terms, who went on to become the favorite in the Kentucky Derby.There was just not enough reflected glory to go around.Hadry, his stable, and his main patron, the late Stuart Janney Jr., were lionized as all that was good about the state's racing industry.But when it came time yesterday for the Maryland racing industry to stand behind Charlie Hadry, the board that regulates the sport in this state copped out.Too bad Mr. Janney, a former chairman of the Maryland Racing Commission, died last year.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1996
ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. -- You won't hear him mentioned with the favorites. And you probably won't see him lighting up the toteboard with the winners.But Dr. Banting, a Maryland-bred with sporting owners, will line up with Cigar in today's $1.05 million Arlington Citation Challenge at Arlington International Racecourse. Dr. Banting is 30-1 in the morning line, but he'll probably be closer to 100-1 by post.Herbert Keil, 69, and his son-in-law, Michael Solomon, 44, Washington lawyers who live in Potomac, Md., own Huckelberry Creek Stables, which includes Dr. Banting.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 8, 2003
Cruise Along pulled away from a solid field of Maryland-bred fillies and mares in dominating fashion to win the $100,000 Geisha Handicap yesterday at Laurel Park. Sent off as the third choice behind multiple stakes winners Shiny Sheet (4-5) and Undercover (2-1), the Larry Murray-trained horse was unhurried early by jockey Abel Castellano as the favorites battled up front. Castellano advanced the daughter of Runaway Groom around the far turn and swept to command at the top of the stretch.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee | April 13, 1991
Trainer Charlie Hadry has appealed a suspension handed him yesterday after one of his runners tested positive for a trace amount of cocaine.The Maryland stewards ignored a request from the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association in suspending Hadry for 15 days. Hadry, who has had one medication-related suspension in his 40-year training career, immediately appealed the penalty to the Maryland Racing Commission.Subtle Step, trained by Hadry, won his first career race March 15 at Pimlico Race Course.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 8, 2003
Cruise Along pulled away from a solid field of Maryland-bred fillies and mares in dominating fashion to win the $100,000 Geisha Handicap yesterday at Laurel Park. Sent off as the third choice behind multiple stakes winners Shiny Sheet (4-5) and Undercover (2-1), the Larry Murray-trained horse was unhurried early by jockey Abel Castellano as the favorites battled up front. Castellano advanced the daughter of Runaway Groom around the far turn and swept to command at the top of the stretch.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
A 3-year-old colt and an 8-year-old horse brought tears, cheers and unabashed joy into the winner's circle yesterday at Pimlico Race Course. Cherokee's Boy, 3, won the $150,000 Federico Tesio Stakes by a commanding 2 3/4 lengths and placed his jubilant owners, two blue-collar Baltimoreans, on the verge of the near-impossible dream: running their horse in the Preakness. Foard Wilgis and Dave Picarello, natives of Remington and Parkville, respectively, had so many friends and relatives mobbing them after the race that the winner's photographs couldn't be taken in the winner's circle.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
Charles H. Hadry, one of the most beloved and respected horsemen in Maryland, died yesterday morning of cancer at his home in Westminster. He was 72. At 16, Hadry began working at the Laurel racetrack for Hall of Fame trainer Frank Whiteley Jr. Hadry began training on his own in the 1950s and reached his zenith in 1988 with Private Terms, the favorite in the Kentucky Derby. He had been ill for about a year, but particularly so in recent weeks. It's almost as if he fought to stay alive until his horse, P Day, could run in the $100,000 John B. Campbell Handicap at Laurel Park.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
P Day brought back more to Charles H. Hadry than the chance for another paycheck when he rejoined the Hadry stable last fall after a failed foray into New York. The 8-year-old horse whom Hadry bred, trained and owned brought renewal to the veteran trainer at a time when spirit meant more than money. Hadry, 72, perhaps the most respected horseman in Maryland, has cancer. Overseeing the return of his favorite horse, especially under such unusual circumstances, was a boost. "It's the best thing that could have happened to him," said Charles J. Hadry, his son. "Horses are his life, his job, all he cares about outside his family.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF fTC | August 9, 1998
P Day won the feature at Laurel Park yesterday, hugging a favorable rail on the turf course for an easy score.But the real star was Awad, the second leading Maryland-bred winner of all time who was paraded in front of an appreciative crowd before the stakes race named for him.With Gregg McCarron aboard and trainer David Donk on hand to supervise, one of the state's all-time top runners cantered around the track as a prelude to his retirement at stud at...
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
Abacus Andy was an instant success on turf yesterday in the Ben Cohen Stakes, and promising 19-year-old jockey J. Z. Santana created quite a stir by riding 49-1 choice Captive Dancer to victory in the fourth race at Pimlico.Abacus Andy outran the favorite Sport d'Hiver by 1 1/4 lengths to win the $58,200 feature, but he almost never got on the track for his first start on turf.Trainer John Alecci said he considered scratching the 4-year-old gelding several times.Alecci had seen all the obstacles facing the horse he had just claimed for $25,000 on May 7 at Pimlico and wanted out.Abacus Andy was a 28-1 choice, was starting out of the extreme outside post at and the feature race was only five furlongs.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
Horse-racing associations are offering rewards for information leading to arrests and convictions in recent cases of "sponging" in Kentucky -- stuffing sponges into the nostrils of racehorses.The Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau is investigating at least five cases in which sponges were inserted into the nasal passages of horses that raced this spring at Churchill Downs. The sponges compromise a horse's ability to run by diminishing its ability to breathe. They could be used to fix a race.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | April 17, 1993
There will a bit of a Hollywood presence today at Old Hilltop.Sam Shepard, a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and actor who has had roles in such movies as "Crimes of the Heart," "The Right Stuff," "Steel Magnolias" and "Country" is making his debut as a Maryland racehorse owner.Shepard's 3-year-old filly, Lila Wanblee, makes her first start in the third race, an event for maiden fillies and mares that carries a $15,500 purse.Charlie Hadry, Shepard's trainer, said he has had the daughter of Capote in his barn for about two months and expects the filly to run well.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1996
ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. -- You won't hear him mentioned with the favorites. And you probably won't see him lighting up the toteboard with the winners.But Dr. Banting, a Maryland-bred with sporting owners, will line up with Cigar in today's $1.05 million Arlington Citation Challenge at Arlington International Racecourse. Dr. Banting is 30-1 in the morning line, but he'll probably be closer to 100-1 by post.Herbert Keil, 69, and his son-in-law, Michael Solomon, 44, Washington lawyers who live in Potomac, Md., own Huckelberry Creek Stables, which includes Dr. Banting.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
Horse-racing associations are offering rewards for information leading to arrests and convictions in recent cases of "sponging" in Kentucky -- stuffing sponges into the nostrils of racehorses.The Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau is investigating at least five cases in which sponges were inserted into the nasal passages of horses that raced this spring at Churchill Downs. The sponges compromise a horse's ability to run by diminishing its ability to breathe. They could be used to fix a race.
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