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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Harold E. Hackman, a retired salesman and World War II veteran, died Nov. 15 of complications from Parkinson's disease at his daughter's Oakenshawe home. He was 90. Born in York, Pa., he was a graduate of William Penn High School. Family members said that first lady Eleanor Roosevelt was the speaker at his high school graduation. He attended what is now Loyola University Maryland. He joined the Army, served in the medical corps and was stationed in the Aleutian Islands at Dutch Harbor.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Harold E. Hackman, a retired salesman and World War II veteran, died Nov. 15 of complications from Parkinson's disease at his daughter's Oakenshawe home. He was 90. Born in York, Pa., he was a graduate of William Penn High School. Family members said that first lady Eleanor Roosevelt was the speaker at his high school graduation. He attended what is now Loyola University Maryland. He joined the Army, served in the medical corps and was stationed in the Aleutian Islands at Dutch Harbor.
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NEWS
May 12, 2005
On May 9, 2005 JAMES FREDERICK HACKMAN JR. of Elkridge, MD; beloved husband of Mary K. Hackman; loving father of James F. Hackman III "T.J.", Matthew C. Hackman & Jacob R. Hackman; loving son of James F. Hackman Sr. and the late Evelyn M. Hackman; cherished brother of Catherine M. Hackman and George C. Hackman and his wife Holly; he is also survived by many loving family members and friends. Family members and friends are invited to call at the GARY L. KAUFMAN FUNERAL HOME AT MEADOWRIDGE MEMORIAL PARK, INC. 7250 Washington Blvd, Elkridge (Exit 6 off of Rt. 100)
NEWS
June 15, 2006
On June 12, 2006 ROSEMARY (nee Murphy); beloved wife of the late William F. Malooly, Sr.; devoted mother of Bishop W. Francis Malooly, T. Austin Malooly, M. Gerard Malooly and his wife Leslie and Martha Hackman and her husband Mark; grandmother of Michael, Erin, Megan, Jonathan and Mary Rose Malooly and Sarah Hackman; great grandmother of Cailey Brooks. A Vigil Service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26), on Thursday at 3 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Ursula Church on Friday at 11 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
NEWS
March 2, 2003
On February 28, 2003, MARY E. HACKMAN (nee Neunan); beloved wife of Harold E. Hackman; devoted mother of Mark T. Hackman and Eileen M. Norton; dear mother-in-law of James J. Norton and Martha Malooly Hackman; loving grandmother of Matthew, Maura and Sarah. A Funeral Mass will be offered Saturday, March 8, 10 A.M. in the Lady Chapel of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles Street. Interment St. Mary's Cemetery, Govans. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Immaculata University, Immaculata, PA or the American Heart Association, 415 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 21201.
NEWS
March 3, 2003
Mary E. Hackman, a retired teacher and resident of Baltimore's Oakenshawe community, died Friday of heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 86. She was a longtime English and Latin teacher at Hamilton and Roland Park junior high schools and at Southern High School. Mary Neunan was born in Philadelphia and was the oldest of four children. She completed high school at Villa Maria Academy in Green Tree, outside Philadelphia. She attended Immaculata University in Immaculata, Pa., on a full scholarship, and earned a bachelor of arts degree with honors in 1937.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 21, 1990
In "Narrow Margin," Gene Hackman catches the train but misses the boat. There's no doubt that Hackman is a great film actor, but it's a shame he doesn't display more discrimination in picking his vehicles.Derived from a 1952 black-and-white film noir about a cop and a female witness (Charles McGraw and Marie Windsor) fleeing hit men on a transcontinental train, this movie lumbers along as if fueled by coal, not diesel. It's the little engine that couldn't.The original had one great advantage.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1998
Right-hander Matt Hackman went the distance, tripled in a go-ahead run and scored the game-winner in a seven-run seventh-inning in Friends' comeback 10-6 victory at Boys' Latin yesterday.The Quakers overcame a 5-1 second-inning deficit for the non-divisional Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association B Conference win, which raised their Division I-leading record to 7-2 and dropped Division II Boys' Latin to 6-3.Tagged for six hits over the first two innings, Hackman (3-1) retired 12 of the next 13 batters before yielding Josh Floam's run-scoring single in the home seventh.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 11, 1996
The Grishamization of the movies continues apace, with this week's new installment derived from the Mississippi attorney-novelist's oeuvre being "The Chamber," which had appeared in bookstores with the emblem "Must be read by June, 1996" stamped on it.As Grishams go, this one is quite good. The familiar pattern is in evidence: A young, idealistic but naive lawyer confronts an ancient American evil, and does battle royale with it. Perhaps what elevates "The Chamber" over the level of the lamentable "A Time to Kill," the brainless zombie that was "The Pelican Brief" or the merely routine "The Firm" is a sense of ambiguity and an unwillingness to reduce character -- quite -- to cartoon specifications.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 20, 1998
Remember Harry Caul? He was the surveillance expert portrayed by Gene Hackman in "The Conversation," Francis Ford Coppola's 1974 masterpiece of suspense, paranoia and contemporary existential gloom.It turns out that Harry didn't fade away, he just moved to Baltimore. At least that's what's cleverly suggested in "Enemy of the State," Tony Scott's high-octane movie that pays homage not only to "The Conversation" but to the venerable canon of paranoid political thrillers, from "Three Days of the Condor" to "All the President's Men."
NEWS
May 12, 2005
On May 9, 2005 JAMES FREDERICK HACKMAN JR. of Elkridge, MD; beloved husband of Mary K. Hackman; loving father of James F. Hackman III "T.J.", Matthew C. Hackman & Jacob R. Hackman; loving son of James F. Hackman Sr. and the late Evelyn M. Hackman; cherished brother of Catherine M. Hackman and George C. Hackman and his wife Holly; he is also survived by many loving family members and friends. Family members and friends are invited to call at the GARY L. KAUFMAN FUNERAL HOME AT MEADOWRIDGE MEMORIAL PARK, INC. 7250 Washington Blvd, Elkridge (Exit 6 off of Rt. 100)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 17, 2003
Runaway Jury, a free adaptation of John Grisham's 1996 novel about jury tampering, has a smart - and white-hot - commercial idea. It grafts the cutting-edge surveillance techniques of espionage thrillers like Enemy of the State onto a controversy-laced courtroom drama. Even audiences accustomed to super-spy technology in CIA films should snap to attention at the spectacle of high-tech bugs corrupting a civic sacrament like jury duty in that gumbo melting-pot New Orleans. The director, Gary Fleder(Kiss the Girls, Don't Say a Word)
NEWS
March 3, 2003
Mary E. Hackman, a retired teacher and resident of Baltimore's Oakenshawe community, died Friday of heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 86. She was a longtime English and Latin teacher at Hamilton and Roland Park junior high schools and at Southern High School. Mary Neunan was born in Philadelphia and was the oldest of four children. She completed high school at Villa Maria Academy in Green Tree, outside Philadelphia. She attended Immaculata University in Immaculata, Pa., on a full scholarship, and earned a bachelor of arts degree with honors in 1937.
NEWS
March 2, 2003
On February 28, 2003, MARY E. HACKMAN (nee Neunan); beloved wife of Harold E. Hackman; devoted mother of Mark T. Hackman and Eileen M. Norton; dear mother-in-law of James J. Norton and Martha Malooly Hackman; loving grandmother of Matthew, Maura and Sarah. A Funeral Mass will be offered Saturday, March 8, 10 A.M. in the Lady Chapel of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles Street. Interment St. Mary's Cemetery, Govans. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Immaculata University, Immaculata, PA or the American Heart Association, 415 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 21201.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 1, 2002
Watch Lance Coadie Williams' hands as he portrays Hamlet, and you get a good idea of what's going on in his character's head. When first confronted by his father's ghost, Williams raises a hand, as if to shelter himself from the ghost's horrible revelation of "murder most foul." In subsequent scenes, Hamlet again lifts a hand to his head, but not as a shield. Instead, he rubs his head as if trying to come to grips with - or perhaps expunge - the awful knowledge of his father's assassination, his uncle's guilt and his own role as avenger.
FEATURES
November 9, 2001
Rated R (language, some violence). Sun score: ** 1/2 Heist is like an improved and streamlined version of last summer's The Score: The writer-director, David Mamet, doesn't even want The to slow down his title. Gene Hackman stars as the canny thief who leads a lean, efficient crew including a stalwart partner (Delroy Lindo), an ace odd-job guy (Ricky Jay) and sometimes his svelte young wife (Rebecca Pidgeon). When his financier and fence (Danny DeVito) reneges on a pay-off unless Hackman's crew pulls another job, the screen is set for a game of cat and mouse.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 23, 2001
Despite its whimsical title, Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing" is a comedy about something - the danger of words. It's an ideal subject for the master wordsmith of the English language, whose comedy of slanders is getting a thoroughly respectable airing in the hands of the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival. It's also a comedy that verges on tragedy when one of its two pairs of lovers is maliciously separated by villainous Don John, a precursor of Iago. Kelli Danaker and Stephen Galloway Jr. are properly winsome as the young sweethearts, Hero and Claudio.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 17, 2003
Runaway Jury, a free adaptation of John Grisham's 1996 novel about jury tampering, has a smart - and white-hot - commercial idea. It grafts the cutting-edge surveillance techniques of espionage thrillers like Enemy of the State onto a controversy-laced courtroom drama. Even audiences accustomed to super-spy technology in CIA films should snap to attention at the spectacle of high-tech bugs corrupting a civic sacrament like jury duty in that gumbo melting-pot New Orleans. The director, Gary Fleder(Kiss the Girls, Don't Say a Word)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 23, 2001
Despite its whimsical title, Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing" is a comedy about something - the danger of words. It's an ideal subject for the master wordsmith of the English language, whose comedy of slanders is getting a thoroughly respectable airing in the hands of the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival. It's also a comedy that verges on tragedy when one of its two pairs of lovers is maliciously separated by villainous Don John, a precursor of Iago. Kelli Danaker and Stephen Galloway Jr. are properly winsome as the young sweethearts, Hero and Claudio.
NEWS
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2001
SELINSGROVE, Pa. - A temperate Sunday evening finds this small town in comfortable repose. People linger at restaurant tables along the neat sidewalk of Market Street. Rabbits hop across the well-kept lawns of well-kept houses. Even the junk piled on the curb for clean-up week seems tidy somehow. Down the road a mile or two, the hoods of parked pickups glisten in a Dairy Queen's red-and-white glow. The young truck owners and their dates wait patiently as twirls of ice cream are caught in cups and cones.
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