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NEWS
October 21, 2005
DAVID RUSSELL HACKLEY, CEO of World Peace Communications, died suddenly on Friday, October 14, 2005 at Westchester Medical Center, following heart surgery. Hackley, 48, was a 15-year resident of Somers, NY. Born in Washington, DC on the Fourth of July, David graduated from Princeton University in 1979. He earned his MBA in finance from the University of Chicago in 1981, and spent 17 years at NBC Television in positions of increasing responsibility. When Hackley left NBC, he was Director of Network Finance.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | November 12, 2006
Brennie Elias Hackley Jr., an Aberdeen Proving Ground scientist who during his more than 50-year career there became a highly regarded expert on the development of medical antidotes for chemical warfare agents, died Nov. 5 of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Joppa resident was 82. He was born and raised in Roanoke, Va., one of 10 children. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1946 from Wilberforce University in Ohio and a master's degree in organic chemistry from the University of Delaware in 1954.
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NEWS
November 10, 2006
On November 5, 2006 DR. BRENNIE E. HACKLEY, JR. Ph.D of Joppa, MD beloved husband of Ethel B. Hackley (nee Battle); devoted father of Michael B. Hackley, Brennie E. Hackley III, and Michele H. Johnson, M.D.; loving brother of Calvin Hackley, Robert Eugene Hackley, Sr., Frances M. Hackley, Kathleen H. Petty, and Oglivia H. Abernathy. Also survived by three grandchildren Brandon R. Johnson, Erin M. Johnson and Miles R. Johnson. A service will be held at the family owned McComas Funeral Home, P.A., Abingdon, MD on Saturday, November 11, 2006 at 10:00 a.m. Interment will be in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA on Friday, December 29, 2006 at 1:00 p.m. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Friday, November 10 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Wilberforce University or the Chemistry Department Graduate Program at the University of Delaware in care of Ethel B. Hackley, P.O. Box 862, Edgewood, MD 21040-0862.
NEWS
November 10, 2006
On November 5, 2006 DR. BRENNIE E. HACKLEY, JR. Ph.D of Joppa, MD beloved husband of Ethel B. Hackley (nee Battle); devoted father of Michael B. Hackley, Brennie E. Hackley III, and Michele H. Johnson, M.D.; loving brother of Calvin Hackley, Robert Eugene Hackley, Sr., Frances M. Hackley, Kathleen H. Petty, and Oglivia H. Abernathy. Also survived by three grandchildren Brandon R. Johnson, Erin M. Johnson and Miles R. Johnson. A service will be held at the family owned McComas Funeral Home, P.A., Abingdon, MD on Saturday, November 11, 2006 at 10:00 a.m. Interment will be in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA on Friday, December 29, 2006 at 1:00 p.m. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Friday, November 10 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Wilberforce University or the Chemistry Department Graduate Program at the University of Delaware in care of Ethel B. Hackley, P.O. Box 862, Edgewood, MD 21040-0862.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | November 12, 2006
Brennie Elias Hackley Jr., an Aberdeen Proving Ground scientist who during his more than 50-year career there became a highly regarded expert on the development of medical antidotes for chemical warfare agents, died Nov. 5 of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Joppa resident was 82. He was born and raised in Roanoke, Va., one of 10 children. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1946 from Wilberforce University in Ohio and a master's degree in organic chemistry from the University of Delaware in 1954.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
Drivers slow down when they see Bill Hackley's police car cruising in Taneytown. Most do a double-take when they realize this is no 1990s patrol car.It's a hulk from the days of cheap and plentiful gasoline. It has a lone red bubble top instead of the flashers on today's police cruisers. Its antique radar unit is as outdated as a Colt .45 against a semiautomatic.The 1968 Chevrolet Biscayne is one of two cars restored to represent antique Baltimore City police cars and the only one that is privately owned and driven for even short distances.
NEWS
July 7, 2005
On July 5, 2005, ROSE LILLIAN SUDMEIER (nee Hackley), beloved wife of the late Wilbert F. Sudmeier; dear great-aunt of William M. Hackley, Denise C. Deel, R. Michael Hackley and Jackie L. Kelly. Also survived by many great-great-nieces and great-great-nephews and dear friends Mary Winebrunner and Frances Blacksten. A Funeral Service will be held in the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc., 1050 York Rd (at Beltway exit 26A) on Friday at 1 P.M. Interment Moreland Memorial Park. Friends may call on Thursday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
Deborah K. Hackley wants what many other twice-convicted drug dealers in Maryland get -- a chance to get out of jail early by seeking counseling.But attorneys involved in her case say Hackley is caught in the middle of a double standard created by a state law that frees convicts who sold certain kinds of drugs from mandatory sentences, yet denies parole to others who sold other types of narcotics.Hackley pleaded guilty in 1988 and again in 1990 to selling a total of about eight grams of PCP to an undercover police officer for $75.She received a suspended prison sentence and probation for her first offense, but has been serving a mandatory 10-year prison term without the possibility of parole at the Patuxent Institution in Jessup since September 1990 on her second conviction.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
Deborah K. Hackley wants what many other twice-convicted drug dealers in Maryland get -- a chance to get out of jail early by seeking counseling.But attorneys involved in her case say Hackley is caught in the middle of a double standard created by a state law that frees convicts who sold certain kinds of drugs from mandatory sentences, yet denies parole to others who sold other types of narcotics.Hackley pleaded guilty in 1988 and again in 1990 to selling a total of about eight grams of PCP to an undercover police officer for $75.She received a suspended prison sentence and probation for her first offense, but has been serving a mandatory 10-year prison term without the possibility of parole at the Patuxent Institution in Jessup since September 1990 on her second conviction.
NEWS
By Elizabeth A. Shack and Elizabeth A. Shack,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2002
Carla Hackley, "Left. Right. Curve." On this rainy Wednesday evening, the only sounds in the Mount Pleasant Ice Arena in Northeast Baltimore are the soft mechanical whine of equipment, the scrape of figure skate blades and a single voice calling instructions. Carla Hackley leads three students in a serpentine pattern. "Come into the line, push and curve," she says. Arms straight out from their shoulders, the students obey, skating tentatively, leaning as they glide in a semicircle. Another push, and they curve the other way, making a series of S-curves down the length of the rink.
NEWS
October 21, 2005
DAVID RUSSELL HACKLEY, CEO of World Peace Communications, died suddenly on Friday, October 14, 2005 at Westchester Medical Center, following heart surgery. Hackley, 48, was a 15-year resident of Somers, NY. Born in Washington, DC on the Fourth of July, David graduated from Princeton University in 1979. He earned his MBA in finance from the University of Chicago in 1981, and spent 17 years at NBC Television in positions of increasing responsibility. When Hackley left NBC, he was Director of Network Finance.
NEWS
July 7, 2005
On July 5, 2005, ROSE LILLIAN SUDMEIER (nee Hackley), beloved wife of the late Wilbert F. Sudmeier; dear great-aunt of William M. Hackley, Denise C. Deel, R. Michael Hackley and Jackie L. Kelly. Also survived by many great-great-nieces and great-great-nephews and dear friends Mary Winebrunner and Frances Blacksten. A Funeral Service will be held in the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc., 1050 York Rd (at Beltway exit 26A) on Friday at 1 P.M. Interment Moreland Memorial Park. Friends may call on Thursday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
By Elizabeth A. Shack and Elizabeth A. Shack,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2002
Carla Hackley, "Left. Right. Curve." On this rainy Wednesday evening, the only sounds in the Mount Pleasant Ice Arena in Northeast Baltimore are the soft mechanical whine of equipment, the scrape of figure skate blades and a single voice calling instructions. Carla Hackley leads three students in a serpentine pattern. "Come into the line, push and curve," she says. Arms straight out from their shoulders, the students obey, skating tentatively, leaning as they glide in a semicircle. Another push, and they curve the other way, making a series of S-curves down the length of the rink.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
Drivers slow down when they see Bill Hackley's police car cruising in Taneytown. Most do a double-take when they realize this is no 1990s patrol car.It's a hulk from the days of cheap and plentiful gasoline. It has a lone red bubble top instead of the flashers on today's police cruisers. Its antique radar unit is as outdated as a Colt .45 against a semiautomatic.The 1968 Chevrolet Biscayne is one of two cars restored to represent antique Baltimore City police cars and the only one that is privately owned and driven for even short distances.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
Deborah K. Hackley wants what many other twice-convicted drug dealers in Maryland get -- a chance to get out of jail early by seeking counseling.But attorneys involved in her case say Hackley is caught in the middle of a double standard created by a state law that frees convicts who sold certain kinds of drugs from mandatory sentences, yet denies parole to others who sold other types of narcotics.Hackley pleaded guilty in 1988 and again in 1990 to selling a total of about eight grams of PCP to an undercover police officer for $75.She received a suspended prison sentence and probation for her first offense, but has been serving a mandatory 10-year prison term without the possibility of parole at the Patuxent Institution in Jessup since September 1990 on her second conviction.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
Deborah K. Hackley wants what many other twice-convicted drug dealers in Maryland get -- a chance to get out of jail early by seeking counseling.But attorneys involved in her case say Hackley is caught in the middle of a double standard created by a state law that frees convicts who sold certain kinds of drugs from mandatory sentences, yet denies parole to others who sold other types of narcotics.Hackley pleaded guilty in 1988 and again in 1990 to selling a total of about eight grams of PCP to an undercover police officer for $75.She received a suspended prison sentence and probation for her first offense, but has been serving a mandatory 10-year prison term without the possibility of parole at the Patuxent Institution in Jessup since September 1990 on her second conviction.
NEWS
December 1, 2004
On November 27, 2004, CARL C., beloved husband of Ruth Siebold Cannella, devoted father of John C. Cannella, Carla A. Hackley and the late Gary C. Cannella, dear brother of Albert and George Cannella. Also survived by four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held in the chapel of Oak Crest Village on Thursday at 10 A.M. Memorial donations in Carl's name may be made to the charity of your choice.
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