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NEWS
March 14, 2004
On Friday, March 12, 2004, BARBARA HACKERMAN (nee Sachs); loving wife of the late Benjamin Hackerman; devoted mother of Janis Bormel, of Reisterstown, MD and Philip Hackerman, of Owings Mills, MD; dear mother-in-law of Ira Bormel and Heather Hackerman; devoted sister of Hedy Lapkin, of Richmond, VA; loving bubby of Sarah, Amy and Rebecca Bormel and Bethany Hackerman. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Sunday, March 14, at 10 A.M. Interment Anshe Emunah Congregation Cemetery, 3901 Washington Blvd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Hackerman House, one of the three buildings that make up the Walters Art Museum , will be closed for about two and a half years beginning July 1, a museum official announced Friday. In addition, galleries housing 19 t h century art on the fourth floor of the Centre Street building will be closed to the public between June 23 and Oct. 25, according to museum spokeswoman Mona M. Rock. It's all part of a long-planned, $5.2 million refurbishment of the museum. Most of the work will involve replacing the 23-year-old fire suppression and climate control systems, Rock said.
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NEWS
October 22, 2005
On Thursday, October 20, 2005 JEANNETTE HACKERMAN (nee Mofsovitz); devoted wife of the late Sangwill "Steve" W. Hackerman; beloved mother of Harvey Hackerman, David Hackerman and the late Rosalind Hackerman, Victor Hackerman and Stanley Hackerman; beloved mother-in-law of Sandy Hackerman; devoted sister of the late Katie Fine, Albert Moffet, Leon Moffet and Milton Mofsovitz; devoted sister-in-law of Lil Moffet and the late Louis Fine and Betty Mofsovitz; loving...
NEWS
February 12, 2014
The Sun's editorial on the late developer Willard Hackerman was very even-handed in summing up the extraordinary contributions of this great man ( "Baltimore's man to see," Feb. 10). However, I believe there is a deeper level to consider when viewing his contributions. Being wealthy, powerful and connected is no reason to treat someone unkindly or suspect them of wrongdoing. I briefly worked for Whiting-Turner as a carpenter in 1975. After repeatedly banging my thumb with a hammer, I realized that my talents lay elsewhere.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | August 1, 1997
The Hackerman House, where the Walters Art Gallery displays its Asian collection, reopens today after a four-day hiatus.The planned months-long closing of the house, which Walters officials blamed on city budget cuts, was averted thanks to rapid response to a fund-raising plea, and a special gift from Mr. and Mrs. Willard Hackerman, the original donors of the Mount Vernon mansion.The Walters has received about $30,000, including the Hackerman gift, since Monday after making an emergency appeal at the end of last week.
FEATURES
May 2, 1991
To celebrate the grand opening of Hackerman House, the public is welcome to several special events planned for Sunday.A parade will begin at noon at the Convention Center on Pratt Street and proceed north on Charles Street, past the reviewing stand at Centre Street. There will be a 75-foot silk dragon, Kung-fu dancers, martial arts groups, costumes of Thailand, Japan, China, Korea and Indonesia, polo club riders and a 100-piece Gamelan orchestra.The dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony with Mayor Kurt Schmoke, Governor William Donald Schaefer and ambassadors from various Asian countries takes place at 1:30 p.m. at the reviewing stand at Charles and Centre streets.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | May 12, 1991
AN ELEGANT EVENING of fine dining and dancing under moonlit tents with an Oriental motif marked the grand opening of the Walters Art Gallery's Hackerman House Museum of Asian Art.The Classic Catering People, who have opened a restaurant there for lunch and private parties, handled the gliterati -- a mere 1,000 who paid $250 a plate -- with their usual pizazz. The Shades of Blue Orchestra had the crowd hopping, many of whom had their pictures snapped by roving photographer Calvin Hayes.Naturally, benefactors Lillian and Willard Hackerman were on hand as were gala co-chairs Sally and Robert "Butch" Michel.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1995
Millionaire philanthropist Willard Hackerman owes Baltimore at least $1 million in delinquent taxes on machinery and office equipment at his Pulaski incinerator, city officials said.The personal property taxes for all nonreal estate holdings at the East Baltimore incinerator were due in September, according to city tax records.Mr. Hackerman, who owns Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., bought the incinerator from the city in 1981.City tax collector Ottavio Grande said that if the taxes aren't paid by May, the city will send Mr. Hackerman a dunning letter.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer Staff Writer Joan Jacobson contributed to this article | December 25, 1993
The owner of the Pulaski Highway incinerator has filed suit against Baltimore, charging that the city is preventing him from fixing air pollution violations at the aging East Baltimore plant or replacing it with a new $200 million trash-to-energy facility.The suit, filed Wednesday in Baltimore County Circuit Court in Towson, triggered an unusual public tiff between city officials and Willard Hackerman, the politically connected businessman and philanthropist who bought the incinerator from the city in 1981 in what has since been criticized as a sweetheart deal.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | July 30, 1997
Hackerman House, the Walters Art Gallery's museum of Asian Art, has been closed temporarily to help meet demands of city budget cuts, Walters director Gary Vikan confirmed last night.The house, a separate building attached to the gallery and originally built as a 19th-century townhouse, will be closed beginning today for up to eight weeks. It will reopen no later than Sept. 21 and perhaps sooner if a Walters fund appeal succeeds."I anticipate this is eight weeks, max," said Vikan. "I hope it will be open in a couple of weeks depending on what happens.
NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Friends and family remembered philanthropist and Whiting-Turner Co. CEO Willard Hackerman on Tuesday as a loyal and smart businessman who was generous with his time and money. Rabbi Mitchell Wohlberg eulogized Hackerman before hundreds of mourners at Beth Tfiloh Congregation. Hackerman, a donor to numerous institutions, including his alma mater the Johns Hopkins University, died Monday at 95 of unknown causes at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Hackerman, who grew up in Forest Park, was ingrained in projects and philanthropy in Maryland for decades.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
Willard Hackerman held no public office, but he was as much a city father to Baltimore as any mayor or City Council member, delegate or senator. Few, if any, have had a larger impact on this community than the 95-year-old man who died at Johns Hopkins Hospital Monday morning, and few have demonstrated greater devotion to it. Mr. Hackerman, the builder of the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the National Aquarium and the Baltimore Convention Center, has...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Philanthropist Willard Hackerman, who transformed a small construction firm into a national giant with $5 billion in annual billings and was instrumental in erecting Maryland landmarks such as Harborplace, died Monday of unknown causes at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 95. His firm, Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., completed the new University of Baltimore School of Law last year and built the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the National Aquarium and M&T Bank Stadium, among countless other projects around the city and state.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2011
Baltimore officials have finalized the $1.1 million sale of a 19-acre "brownfields" site on Pulaski Highway to construction magnate Willard Hackerman, who plans to develop a big-box store or warehouses or both, a city economic development official said Tuesday. The sale of the lot, the former site of a waste incinerator, was completed Friday, said M.J. "Jay" Brodie, president of the Baltimore Development Corp. The city's Planning Commission approved a "planned unit development" designation for the property a day earlier, allowing the uses proposed by Hackerman, president and chief executive of the Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. Hackerman formed Pulaski Limited Partnership to develop the Northeast Baltimore site and still needs City Council approval to proceed.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
The former site of a waste incinerator in Northeast Baltimore could be developed into a big-box store or warehouses or a combination under a plan being proposed by construction magnate Willard Hackerman, who has a contract to purchase the vacant, 19-acre site on Pulaski Highway from the city for more than $1 million. Hackerman, president and chief executive of the Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., has asked the city to designate the 6709 Pulaski Highway parcel a planned unit development, which would allow him to proceed with one of three scenarios.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Construction magnate Willard Hackerman has offered to finance and build an 18,500-seat arena in downtown Baltimore, civic leaders say, freeing taxpayers from having to foot the bill and significantly increasing the chances that plans for a $900 million convention center expansion and arena will become a reality. News of Hackerman's offer was made public Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a private business group that has been exploring ways to build an arena that would be combined with an expanded convention center to bolster the city's tourism business and add life to Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | January 27, 1994
Baltimore officials have reached a verbal agreement with the owner of the Pulaski Highway incinerator to end a waste disposal arrangement that has cost the city millions of dollars in operating subsidies.Ending the 13-year-old pact would save the city at least $4 million annually, officials said yesterday.It also would release the city from an obligation to pay up to $60 million to renovate the incinerator to meet environmental standards, they said.If finalized, the agreement would stop city plans to condemn the incinerator, and would settle a breach-of-contract suit filed against the city last month by the incinerator's owner.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
A Towson businessman has offered to convert a local building into a transitional shelter for homeless women and their children in Howard County.Willard Hackerman, president of the Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., met last week with County Executive Charles I. Ecker, housing officials and homeless advocates to present his proposal.Mr. Ecker announced the project Friday at an awards ceremony for county grant-in-aid recipients. He said he wanted to get the word out that the county is looking for a building to convert into a shelter.
NEWS
March 11, 2009
The Nathan and Mary Hackerman Lodge #2664, B'nai B'rith, regrets the passing of our Member DORIS PATZ and sister-in-law of members Willard and Lillian Hackerman. We extend sincere sympathy to the family.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
Six months after Baltimore banker Edwin F. Hale Sr. dropped out of a plan to erect an Inner Harbor statue to honor former Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer, another local businessman has offered to complete the project as a gift to the city. Willard Hackerman, chief executive of Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., has offered to pay for the Schaefer statue by Baltimore sculptor Rodney Carroll. Baltimore's Public Art Commission is scheduled to meet today to consider revised plans for the project, first presented last year and estimated to cost up to $500,000.
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