Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHack
IN THE NEWS

Hack

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 22, 1991
Morton Hack, a retired administrator at the Correctional Camp Center at Jessup, died Wednesday at Sinai Hospital after a stroke. He was 70 and had lived on Fordleigh Road.Services for Mr. Hack were being held today at the Levinson funeral establishment, 6010 Reisterstown Road.He retired last June, having worked in the office of the state Division of Correction for 25 years. He also had taught accounting.Serving in the Navy in World War II, he was an officer aboard an LST -- a tank-carrying landing ship -- that was in the first wave of the Normandy invasion.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and four other prominent institutions will spend the next five years trying to turn a theoretical "next-generation" form of encryption into a practical way to better protect software from hackers. Hopkins, the University of California, Los Angeles, Stanford University, the University of Texas and Columbia University are forming the Center for Encrypted Functionalities through a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation. They are exploring a strategy known as obfuscation, which can hide the inner workings of programs from outsiders.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 29, 2003
On Saturday September 27, 2003 ERNEST HACK, beloved husband of the late Bertha Belle Hack (nee Horvich) devoted father of Roberta Siegel Hyman of Seattle, WA., dear father-in-law of Richard Hyman, devoted brother of Homer Hack of Annapolis, MD., and Gladys Goldstein of Baltimore, MD, loving grandfather of Michael and Betsy Hyman, also survived by three loving great-grandchildren and many nieces, nephews and dear friends. Funeral services and interment will be held at the Har Sinai Congregation Cemetery, Garrison Forest Rd., on Monday September 29 at 2 P.M. Please omit flowers, family at home(Park Plaza Apts)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
When I tell my students that most of the work of a copy editor is to take texts that are flawed and leave them merely mediocre, they look faintly stunned. (I get that a lot.)  Most journalism is routine, therefore average, therefore mediocre. There should be no shame in the simple conveying of such information, accurately, clearly, succinctly.  Journalists go wrong when they display a misplaced ambition to make routine news stories literary, typically with mixed or strained metaphors, pretentious allusions, and overwrought diction.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candy.thomson@baltsun.com | March 14, 2010
Visiting the Maryland General Assembly is like having a front-row seat at Short Attention Span Theater. Lawmakers hope you don't remember what they did to you last year and count on you not remembering two years ago. Otherwise, how do you explain the proposal to slash $1 million from the Fisheries Service budget? Remember -- there's that word -- recreational anglers by and large supported a move to nearly double many license fees to infuse the cash-strapped Fisheries Service with some financial juice.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
JAMES O. HACK; beloved husband of Gertrude D. Hack. A Memorial Service is to be held in the chapel of the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME, 2222 W. North Ave. on Saturday, January 29. Family hour 11:30 A.M. with service to begin at 12 noon.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
A Baltimore jury convicted a 27-year-old man of first degree rape for using a rouse to lure a woman into his car and then raping her at knifepoint. Michael D. Glenn was found guilty of first-degree rape, first-degree assault, use of a deadly weapon and other sexual offenses in the May 8, 2011 incident, the Baltimore City State's Attorney's office said Friday. Prosecutors say Glenn posed as a hack taxi driver and picked up a woman, offering to transport her to her destination in exchange for a fee. But he drove her to Leakin Park instead, and put a box cutter to her neck, repeatedly threatened to kill her and raped her. Glenn will be sentenced on April 4. He faces a maximum of two life terms plus 38 years in prison.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2011
A Hungarian man's attempt to blackmail a U.S. hotel chain into giving him a job landed him in U.S. custody, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. Attila Nemeth, 26, pleaded guilty to hacking the computer system of Marriott International Corp. and threatening to release the company's proprietary information unless the chain gave him a job maintaining the company's computer system, according to a statement by Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Marriott is headquartered in Montgomery County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 1, 2002
IT'S FUN TO watch the rich and famous air out the laundry in public. Especially when they're two fabulously wealthy institutions dedicated to the very highest academic and community ideals. That's why there was more than a little chuckling and chortling behind the dignified outrage which greeted last week's news that Princeton University had hacked into a Yale University computer. The kids on both sides have been doing this for years. What made this hack particularly delicious is that it was carried out by adults - who presumably should have known better.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Names and Social Security numbers of about 9,700 Marylanders with disabilities were exposed when a hacker breached a state contractor's computer systems in October, state health officials said Monday. The breach of Service Coordination Inc. involved a document that contained information on 70 percent of its clients, a company spokesperson said. The document also included clients' medical assistance numbers, Medicaid status, demographics and other information related to their case management.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
In the two weeks between recent revelations that hackers stole data on students, alumni and faculty from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Johns Hopkins University, nearly 360,000 records were swiped in similar attacks at schools in Pennsylvania, Indiana and North Dakota. Online thieves have increasingly sought sensitive or otherwise valuable data from educational institutions, experts say. Last year alone, breaches included possible exposure of 2.5 million Social Security and bank account numbers associated with an Arizona community college system, 74,000 Social Security numbers of University of Delaware students and staff, and 145,000 applications to Virginia Tech, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.
NEWS
By David Horsey | November 5, 2013
If we could get NSA hackers to go to work on the Obamacare website, health care for every American would be delivered before Christmas. At least, it seems as if that would be the case. The folks who brought us HealthCare.gov cannot seem to keep the site from freezing up and shunting people seeking insurance coverage to a virtual waiting room with no doors. Meanwhile, the cyberspies at the National Security Agency are apparently smart enough to break into the telephones and electronic communications of every head of state from Berlin to Rio. Why does one set of government techies seem as smart as Q, James Bond's gadgets guy, and another set seem as knuckle-headed as Dwight Schrute on "The Office?"
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
HopHacks - a 36-hour, sleepless, caffeine-fueled, mad-rush of computer programming - came to an end Sunday with bleary-eyed Johns Hopkins University students unveiling their (mostly) finished inventions ... and then crashing. The creations, computer programs developed using publicly available code, ranged from the high-minded (an app to help connect the homeless to nearby shelters) to the college-minded (an app to find new happy hour deals). There was a database to make DNA sequences easier for geneticists to search; an organizer for those never-read links and news articles emailed by parents; and a Pandora-esque program that generated playlists based on favorite bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
I will leave it to The Sun's political reporters to write about who "won" or "lost" this cooked-up and dumbed-down TV cartoon of a debate between Gov. Martin O'Malley and his Texas counterpart Rick Perry Wednesday on CNN's "Crossfire. " I am only here to say how sad I am to see Maryland's Democratic governor and our political discourse bent to fit the phony dictates of cable TV this way. When comedian Jon Stewart famously denounced the "Crossfire" format in 2004, he called the two hosts that night, Tucker Carlson and Paul Begala, "partisan hacks.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
First The New York Times; now the Canton Kayak Club? The website for the group of urban paddling enthusiasts was the victim of an apparent hacking Wednesday and Thursday, bearing an image of a man on a horse with a spear and the messages "NO WAR!" and "All Hail the Islamic world, we're here!" "We have no idea who did it nor why someone would hack our site," c lub Vice President Cliff Charland said. "It is obviously something we're not happy about. " The website had been restored to normal as of 3:30 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Newly appointed Anne Arundel County Police Chief Kevin Davis has been on Twitter for less than two weeks, and already he's been hacked. The department's own account was compromised, too. On Wednesday morning, the department announced two unauthorized tweets each had been sent from the department's account @AACOPD and Davis' account @ChiefKevinDavis, sometime between late Tuesday night and early Wednesday morning, when they were noticed....
NEWS
June 14, 2013
It was quite entertaining to read Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column alleging President Barack Obama has made numerous foreign policy blunders ("Obama foreign policy follies befuddle both left and right," June 9). Unfortunately, Mr. Ehrlich was only successful at lobbing in all of the political buzz words like Obamacare, Benghazi, Bill Ayers, Jeremiah Wright (!) but with no cohesive message or argument. Predictably, in a column supposedly about foreign policy, the governor also chose to mention President Obama's "dismal" domestic track record and "distressing" judicial appointments.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.