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From Sun staff reports | July 12, 2012
In what everyone wants to be the final words on the brouhaha over Tyler Clary's takedown of Michael Phelps ' work habits, both swimmers addressed the issue on Thursday. The short version: Clary said, my bad. Phelps said, whatever. The long version, according to news reports from Knoxville, where the Olympics-bound swim team has been training at the University of Tennessee natatorium, is that the two cleared the air and that they're focused on beating up on the rest of the world at the Games in London rather than each other.
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NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Joy remembers the day that risking a few dollars for fun turned into a rush she couldn't control. It was Feb. 14, 2000, at the casino in Charles Town, W.Va. She plunked some money into a slot machine, and out came hundreds of dollars - and the start of an addiction she could never satisfy. "I went out with $30 and went home with $400 and that's all she wrote," she said. Like an alcoholic who needs more drinks to get drunk, she needed to wager ever larger sums to recapture the thrill.
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NEWS
April 26, 2010
Some people have made the analogy that the politicians in Washington running the federal government are spending money like drunken sailors, but this is a false analogy. When a drunken sailor runs out of money, he stops spending. Iver Mindel, Cockeysville
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 23, 2014
"Sorry. " It's a verbal crutch women often use instead of "I didn't hear what you said," or "Excuse me. " A way of being extra polite. It is also the subject of a new ad campaign by Procter & Gamble, the makers of Pantene hair products, which shows women at work and at home who seem to be apologizing for even existing. A woman prefaces a question at a meeting with "sorry, but. " Another young woman apologizes before entering someone's office. A mother says "sorry" as she hands off her son to his father so she can get dinner out of the fridge.
EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
Perhaps government banning of sugary drinks oversteps. It is a meaningful effort to reduce the burden of obesity on everyone. One thing that has stood out in the debate over health care reform is repeated statements from health care consumers that they do not want to pay for the other guy's health problems. There is one sure way to get consumers on board with changes in habits and consumption and to take more responsibility in their lifestyle choices. Through the wallet. How about higher co-payments for folks whose BMI, which does not lie, is over the recommended goal?
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | March 27, 2007
We hear so often that Americans are poor savers that we forget there are plenty of workers who amass sizable sums with little fanfare. They might be in the next cubicle, next door or next-of-kin. It's not that they save because they make tons of money. Many good savers have modest incomes. They just don't spend every penny of it. Savers say they don't deny themselves the fun things in life. They spend on things that are important to them but don't waste dollars on the other stuff. But you can't help but wonder: Why are some people such good savers while others - even those with healthy six-figure incomes - live from paycheck to paycheck?
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | March 26, 2002
DESPITE THE recent rain, it appears that Maryland and much of the East Coast is becoming, if not a desert, a lot drier than normal. The statistics are already terrifying since winter is traditionally our wettest season, and most days in recent months have been sunny and warm with cold, dry nights. Gov. Parris N. Glendening has said that Maryland is headed toward one of its severest droughts ever, having experienced its fourth-driest winter since records were first kept in 1871. I've lost track of how many times we've been asked to cut back on our water consumption over the years.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 6, 1993
They're your problems, but we're going to be nice -- one o our many New Year's resolutions -- and tell you how to solve them.We've decided that in 1993 we're going to break these horrible habits, once and for all. And we're going to help you do the same.* How to tame nervous tics -- or, at the very least, how to stop biting your nails, twirling your hair and bouncing your legs.Keep a "bad behavior diary" so you know when you're biting your nails or twirling your hair or bouncing your leg up and down.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 19, 2001
THIS IS A hard time of year to break habits, especially bad ones. Over the years, I have acquired a barrel-load of bad holiday habits, most of them involving intimate sessions with cream, eggs and sugar. This year, for example, I resolved I was going to break the fruitcake habit. I was not going to bake my usual batch of the cakes, loaded with eggs, molasses, brown sugar, butter and the key ingredients - lemon and orange rinds that you candy yourself. The cake is dark, rich and ambrosial.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson writes editorials for The Sun | May 25, 1991
Old habits die hard, especially bad ones. Racialdiscrimination in America is older then the Republic, so it is not surprising that it lingers long after the Civil War, Reconstruction and the grisly decades of Jim Crow oppression.What is surprising is that so many opponents of progress expect anyone to believe the whole fight can be terminated by mere expressions of good will. One example, and there are many, is a letter from Samuel Podberesky, written in response to last week's column on his son's attempt to derail the Banneker scholarships at College Park.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A group of McDaniel College students and elementary school kids have only needed one thing to bond: a couple of hours in the gym together. With a few balls, a plastic bat and some jump ropes, the newly established Fitness Buddies group meets weekly under the direction of Roger Isom, a McDaniel sophomore who designed the program. It's kind of like Big Brothers Big Sisters for fitness, says Isom, an exercise science and physical education major. "I want to show them that exercise isn't just for athletes," he says.
NEWS
March 15, 2014
The roadside litter in our home state is deplorable! It is always noticeable, but in the winter time when the trees and shrubs are denuded of leaves, it is so much more so. Take an exit or entrance ramp to any road and you see tons of cans, bottles and food containers. People in this state are pigs; they can't seem to take their trash with them and dispose at home or in a container. Such a great message for our youth to see no respect for our planet. We talk about creating jobs. How about road cleanup?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
It's not often someone welcomes the command to hit the floor and do push-ups, but Hilltop Elementary School fifth-grader Christian Gavarrete didn't hesitate Tuesday when Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice ordered, "Give me 20. " The 10-year-old said he hadn't done that many push-ups in two years, but with schoolmates and staff cheering him, Gavarrete accomplished the feat well enough to impress even Rice. The Ravens star visited Hilltop Elementary to stress the importance of breakfast and exercise as part of the Maryland Meals for Achievement program, which serves free breakfasts to students regardless of family income.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Say the word "philanthropist" and the names of the wealthy and powerful come to mind. But philanthropists don't need to make million-dollar gifts to help change lives. Many nonprofits in the Baltimore area thrive by receiving many small gifts - the result of people of average means putting aside a little money to benefit a good cause. To mark the season of giving, we offer snapshots of donors and beneficiaries at three nonprofit groups that use small gifts to make a big difference in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
As I drive around Howard County, I constantly see the Choose Civility magnets on the back of cars, mini-vans, trucks and I think it's wonderful. Unfortunately, I'm also seeing an increase of aggressive driving, too. From excessive speeding, to tailgating to inappropriate gestures; is this necessary? We all need to slow down, calm down and choose civility when driving. We are a community and, to be honest, sooner or later someone is going to get hurt. So the next time you want to speed, curse or whatever because someone cost you 15 seconds more on the road, think about this: Those 15 seconds could be time that you spend listening to a song, telling a joke with your family or even just be the reason you arrived at your destination safely.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 22, 2013
Maggie is a 15-year-old indoor cat, and she loves to play in water. She climbs up on the toilet seat and splashes around. But she also splashes in the community water bowl (there are two other cats), and the water is all over the floor. She drinks by putting her paw in the water and then licking it. I am constantly refilling this self-watering bowl because she splashes it all out. How can I break her of this behavior? She's driving us nuts with the mess. She's also keeping our other (male)
NEWS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | July 16, 2006
I COACH GIRLS' 12U FAST-pitch softball, and some of my players have already developed bad throwing habits. Could you share some teaching tips and drills for improving overhand throwing mechanics? Steve Nichols, Milwaukee, Wis. DEAR STEVE / / Poor throwing habits are abundant in youth baseball as well. The best way to overcome them is to break the throwing motion down into its various parts. With throwing, the biggest issues we see are: failure to use a four-seam grip, getting the hand under the ball as it is taken out of the glove and up (pie throwing)
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III | April 16, 2000
Just last week, in his remarks to the Council on Competitiveness, Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers bemoaned the appalling savings habits of American consumers. In a report two days later, the International Monetary Fund pointed at the same problem. The "personal savings rate" of U.S. consumers -- what's left over from our take-home pay after our car-trips to the mall or cyber-journeys to Amazon.com -- has been declining for years and on paper appears truly abysmal. But that figure is misleading, since it doesn't count the hefty bull-market gains that savers have earned on money stashed in stocks, bonds and mutual funds via their 401(k)
EXPLORE
June 19, 2013
Last week's Flier included tragic news of a Howard County police officer making an illegal turn in Anne Arundel and critically injuring a family traveling legally on a roadway. As pedestrians and bicyclists, my husband and I have both been cut off by Howard County police cars making a right turn into a lighted "Walk" zone (Broken Land and Little Patuxent). I wonder if we were even seen. Also, I witnessed a Howard County police car speed into an intersection and do a 360, endangering all cars and pedestrians at the scene (Twin Rivers and Harpers Farm)
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Less than a week after Courtney Upshaw acknowledged that he weighed 285 pounds, Ravens coach John Harbaugh said that the second-year linebacker has to improve his eating habits in order to reach his full potential. "Courtney's weight issue - [and] he does need to lose some pounds - is that  he doesn't eat right,"  Harbaugh said today following the Ravens' organized team activity. "Courtney eats too much and he doesn't eat all of the right foods. He knows that and that's something he's going to have to get a handle on or he's not going to be the best that he can be. " For the second year in a row, Upshaw reported to offseason workouts and immediately faced questions about his playing shape.
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