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EXPLORE
June 10, 2013
Proceeds from Clear Your Clutter Day, an annual Earth Day initiative, at Harford Community College on April 27, were presented to Habitat for Humanity Susquehanna.
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NEWS
By Becky Robinson | September 4, 2014
The first day of school can be scary for little ones, and for Stephanie it was traumatic. A small tortoiseshell cat with tiny white toes, Stephanie - as she has been nicknamed by the shelter now caring for her - created a flurry of news stories and speculation over the Labor Day weekend after she got lost inside a local school. Richard Henry Lee Elementary in Glen Burnie treated her kitty sighting with the severity of a bomb threat, choosing to evacuate students and close at 9:45 a.m. on Friday of last week, after a teacher caught a glimpse of Stephanie loose without a hall pass.
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EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
WESTMINSTER — Carroll County's Department of Public Works, Bureau of Solid Waste, announced this week that Habitat for Humanity will open a ReStore unit at the Northern Landfill Recycling Center in Westminster. ReStore is a nonprofit retail organization that resells new and used building materials, home furnishings and appliances to the public. ReStore sells donated goods to raise funds to build or renovate affordable housing for families in need. Donations gathered at the landfill will be taken to the ReStore Home Improvement Center in Frederick.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Two of the area's Habitat for Humanity groups said Wednesday they plan to merge this fall, a move designed to ease fundraising and the coordination of volunteers. The combined organization is to take the name of the Halethorpe-based Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake, with Sandtown Habitat for Humanity's 10-person team absorbed into the larger, 70-person organization. Chesapeake CEO Mike Posko, who is to continue to lead the affiliate, said the merger will reduce confusion among donors and volunteers, who were previously torn between the two groups.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Affordable-housing provider Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake said its new chief executive — who brings a construction and finance background — will come on board this month. Mike Posko, a principal with real estate consulting firm Cross Street Partners in Baltimore, replaces longtime CEO Mike Mitchell at the helm of the nonprofit after Mitchell's resignation in November. Before Cross Street, Posko worked at developer Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse and at the Federal Reserve.
NEWS
December 9, 2009
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. joined officials from Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake on Tuesday to celebrate the opening of the nonprofit housing agency's new offices in Halethorpe. The organization, which helps provide new or refurbished homes for eligible needy families, recently combined its Anne Arundel and Baltimore County facilities and staff. Leasing the 38,000-square-foot office on Commerce Drive triples the space for 38 full-time employees, two VISTA members and 11 AmeriCorps members.
EXPLORE
September 19, 2011
Habitat for Humanity Susquehanna, the ecumenical non-profit housing organization devoted to building, renovating and repairing homes in partnership with low-income families, has the appointment of Katie York and Sarah Colenda to its board of directors. Katie York, of Aberdeen, is program specialist in Health Care Careers at Cecil College in North East. She is also a member of both the Committee on Nursing and Allied Health and the Administrative Professional Organization. York says of her appointment to the board, "As someone who lives in Harford County and works in Cecil County, I feel it is imperative to increase awareness of Habitat in my local community, both in regards to fundraising efforts and potential homeowners.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2011
Aelred Geis tried to make the world better for birds and people, in that order. He studied ways to coax birds back into urban areas, helped persuade Jim Rouse to set aside 1,000 acres of prime Howard County real estate for a nature preserve, turned his Clarksville farm into a wildlife sanctuary and not only built a better bird feeder, but also filled it with superior seed that he developed. Geis could be loud and confrontational with a touch of arrogance when the circumstances warranted it, his friends fondly remember.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
They pulled, scraped and snipped, chatting about the satisfaction of giving nature a boost as well as the task of checking themselves for ticks. In a little more than two hours on Tuesday morning, these dozen volunteers working alongside Howard County parks staffers had offered TLC to about 300 young trees and shrubs, planted eight more saplings and removed invasive plants in a low-lying section of the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area. A similar event takes place once a month for much of the year in the 1,051-acre parkland under a longtime Conservation Stewardship Program coordinated with the county's master gardeners, volunteers who are part of the University of Maryland Extension Service.
NEWS
November 10, 1991
Providing habitat for the county's ring-necked pheasant could curtail the decline in its population, a supervisor from the wildlife program of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources said."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The U.S. Department of Interior has awarded more than $7 million to four projects in Maryland aimed at guarding Chesapeake Bay shoreline and habitat against future severe storms. The funding is part of $107 million in "coastal resilience" grants distributed among 11 states - from Massachusetts to Virginia and west to Ohio - to help protect them from the kind of damage wrought by Superstorm Sandy in 2012. A plan to add 25 acres of new salt marsh and remove invasive plants in Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge received $3.5 million.
NEWS
Teddi Glaros Nicolaus | April 29, 2014
Hang the feeder and grab the camera! Throughout May, hummingbirds will be returning en masse to Howard County from their wintering grounds in Central America. The smallest of the world's birds, these tiny flying jewels are now shopping around for summer homes. With a little planning, you can easily sell a few of them on the amenities of your own backyard or garden. Hailed by many cultures as symbols of love, joy, life, luck and beauty, hummingbirds delight and amaze  bird watchers.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Underwater grasses rebounded last year in the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers, partially reversing a three-year decline in a key indicator of the bay's health, scientists said Monday. Aerial surveys detected a 24 percent increase in aquatic vegetation baywide, from 48,195 acres in 2012 to 59,927 acres last year. That's only about third of the goal federal and state officials have set for restoring grasses to levels approaching what they were 50 or 60 years ago. Robert J. Orth, a biologist with the Virginia Institute of Marine Science who coordinates the two-state survey, called last year's growth "a good recovery from what we've been seeing in the previous three years, but it still is far off from our high point" of nearly 90,000 acres in 2002.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 1, 2014
A record expansion of Maryland's "wildlands" passed the General Assembly Tuesday, as the House of Delegates gave final approval to an O'Malley administration priority to designate nealry 22,000 acres of sensitive state-owned lands as legally protected wilderness areas. The measure, previously passed by the Senate, creates nine new wildlands and expands 14 existing ones in nine counties across the state.  The largest tracts are in rural western Maryland and on the Eastern Shore. But there's even one in the heavily developed Baltimore area - an addition to Soldiers Delight, an ecologically rich swath of rocky soil and grassy savanna in Owings Mills that naturalists say is the largest ecosystem of its type on the East Coast.
NEWS
By Martha K. Johnston | January 9, 2014
The holidays are over. The Ravens are sidelined for the season. Most of winter lies ahead. Many Marylanders are turning for warmth and hope to the gardening catalogues now arriving in their mailboxes. In 2014, it's time to think outside the boxwood. Over the decades, Americans have lost sight that our gardens and yards are living, breathing ecosystems that can contribute to or degrade our natural environment. Consequently, many of our most familiar plants have little value to wildlife, and our yards are squandered opportunities.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
The Town of Bel Air is taking small steps to create a pedestrian path connecting Rockfield Park with Bel Air High School. One of the first steps toward that goal was taken Tuesday evening when members of the Board of Town Commissioners approved an easement across one private property during their town meeting. The 8-foot wide easement across 404 Giles St. was approved unanimously by the four commissioners present. Mayor Edward Hopkins, who had a death in his family, was absent.
NEWS
January 16, 1991
The Carroll County chapter of Habitat for Humanity, a non-denominational Christian housing ministry, is battling bad weather to finish its first project."
NEWS
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | January 26, 1995
Howard County's Christmas trees soon will sleep with the fishes.Along with the Quick Release Bass Masters, a regional fishing group, the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks will install about two dozen Christmas trees in Warfield Pond this spring."
EXPLORE
August 12, 2013
State Farm is a supporting partner in the mission to raise awareness of affordable housing issues for veterans and military families, Habitat for Humanity Susquehanna announced recently. State Farm's $8,000 donation will help the military community and volunteers build a home for a deserving family in Harford County. Habitat for Humanity Susquehanna and State Farm are committed to meeting the needs of the community by focusing on promoting first-time homeownership through affordable housing Local State Farm employees from the Tomlinson Agency continued their support of Habitat for Humanity Susquehanna by volunteering on the construction site Saturday morning.
NEWS
By Joel Dunn | July 16, 2013
A little osprey chick has been the center of attention for a growing crowd of admirers this summer. It's the third chick to hatch to a pair of osprey, Tom and Audrey, who make their home on a nesting platform at the end of a dock on Kent Island. It's an osprey home like many others, with one exception: It has a hi-def video camera attached. So Tom and Audrey's busy nest-hold is being beamed out to the world via http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org , a real reality TV show. Thousands of folks check in daily to see whether Tom has brought home the fish, whether Audrey is tending the nest, and - maybe most of all - whether that little chick will survive to fly away.
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