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By McClatchy News Service | November 3, 1993
Up to now, if you've wanted to order hot sauces, barbecue sauces, jerk marinades and other spicy foods by mail, Mo Hotta -- Mo Betta in San Luis Obispo, Calif., was where you turned.But now it's got competition. Javier "Papo" Muniz, a musician with a degree in sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Warren "Willy" Rosen, an artist and chef from Minneapolis, have teamed up to produce the Blazing Chile Bros. catalog.Based in Aptos, Santa Cruz County, they've assembled some 120 products, including Devil Drops, a rare sauce made from the datil pepper in St. Augustine, Fla.; Capital Punishment pepper sauce ("Once the bottle is opened, not even a call from the governor can save you")
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By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Wings are the classic football appetizer. The usual flavor combination applied to wings is a buttery hot sauce and a salad dressing for dunking the wings. Nothing wrong with that. But if you want to take your tailgate to a new level, give these wings a try. The rich spicy heat from the habanero peppers along with the Jamaican jerk flavors of allspice, green onions, cinnamon, thyme and nutmeg really make these wings stand out. The nice thing about this recipe is that you can do most of the work the day before the game by placing your chicken in the marinade overnight and grilling it when you get to the stadium (or to your backyard grill)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Wings are the classic football appetizer. The usual flavor combination applied to wings is a buttery hot sauce and a salad dressing for dunking the wings. Nothing wrong with that. But if you want to take your tailgate to a new level, give these wings a try. The rich spicy heat from the habanero peppers along with the Jamaican jerk flavors of allspice, green onions, cinnamon, thyme and nutmeg really make these wings stand out. The nice thing about this recipe is that you can do most of the work the day before the game by placing your chicken in the marinade overnight and grilling it when you get to the stadium (or to your backyard grill)
NEWS
September 25, 2010
This is the time of year when men make hot sauce. Gallons of it. Much of it named "nuclear" or "killer" or, in case of John "Boog" Powell, a habanero pepper sauce that he calls "Not a Child's Playting. " The lure of hot sauce has as much to do with derring-do and a tolerance for pain as with taste, and according to recent scholarship out of Yale, it may be the one thing that truly separates man from beast. Anecdotal evidence suggests that "man," in this instance, is the operative word.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | March 30, 1994
Southwestern cuisine is trendy. Practically overnight it jumped from cafes in Santa Fe, N.M., into restaurants throughout the nation, then into home kitchens.If you like cooking the hot stuff, but you're having trouble finding just the right chili pepper for a recipe, the Old Southwest Trading Co., a mail-order retailer in Albuquerque, N.M., offers a catalog for ordering dozens of Southwest items.The company offers a wide assortment of dried chilies, including more than a dozen exotic chilies, and will ship fresh New Mexico green chilies during fresh chili season.
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,The Dallas Morning News | September 5, 1993
Some chilies add a little spice to your food. Other chilies make you cry, take your breath away.When chili-lover Rudy Roberson ate his first habanero -- one of the world's hottest chilies -- the heat was so intense he nearly fainted.Most people would avoid such incendiary peppers. Others crave the heat. Pepper fiends like Mr. Roberson don't even flinch at jalapenos. He's addicted to the big guns."I especially like the Scotch bonnet," says Mr. Roberson, whose Louisiana-born mother gave him an early taste of spicy food.
NEWS
September 25, 2010
This is the time of year when men make hot sauce. Gallons of it. Much of it named "nuclear" or "killer" or, in case of John "Boog" Powell, a habanero pepper sauce that he calls "Not a Child's Playting. " The lure of hot sauce has as much to do with derring-do and a tolerance for pain as with taste, and according to recent scholarship out of Yale, it may be the one thing that truly separates man from beast. Anecdotal evidence suggests that "man," in this instance, is the operative word.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | September 5, 2001
WORKING WITH a mysterious ingredient can add excitement to supper, especially if the ingredient is a fiery pepper. That is what I have been doing lately. I have been fooling around with these peppers that are about the size of my little finger. They are green, then they turn red. They are skin-tingling hot. If, like me, you are foolish enough to work barehanded when you slice open one of these peppers and remove its seeds, you will pay. You will absent-mindedly scratch your cheek with your pepper-contaminated fingers, and suddenly it will feel as if a colony of fire ants were stinging your skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2006
After years of toiling in big restaurants such as Chevy's in Annapolis and the Tex Mex Grill in the Inner Harbor, business partners Oscar Mendez and Edgar Sorto have opened a little place of their own. This charming little restaurant in the heart of Greektown serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. The service is friendly, the food arrives quickly, the prices are bargain-basement cheap and the setting is unassuming and relaxing. The owners are in the process of obtaining a beer and wine license, they say. The menu at Habanero Grill wanders around the globe, stopping in Peru for ceviche mixto ($9.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | November 30, 2011
Don't be fooled. Silo.5%, the new wine bar in Locust Point, stands out for more than their extensive list of vino. The scene - a modern lounge with black leather furniture, intimately arranged; the bar - a clean slate-marble accented in green lighting; and the scenery - a panoramic glass exterior opens to a harbor view. It's a perfect venue for a cool, casual cocktail date. Its drink menu runs seamlessly together with its style - classic with a modern edge. My favorite, Catch U in the Rye, is a spicy, sexy take on an old-school American favorite: the Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2006
After years of toiling in big restaurants such as Chevy's in Annapolis and the Tex Mex Grill in the Inner Harbor, business partners Oscar Mendez and Edgar Sorto have opened a little place of their own. This charming little restaurant in the heart of Greektown serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. The service is friendly, the food arrives quickly, the prices are bargain-basement cheap and the setting is unassuming and relaxing. The owners are in the process of obtaining a beer and wine license, they say. The menu at Habanero Grill wanders around the globe, stopping in Peru for ceviche mixto ($9.95)
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | September 5, 2001
WORKING WITH a mysterious ingredient can add excitement to supper, especially if the ingredient is a fiery pepper. That is what I have been doing lately. I have been fooling around with these peppers that are about the size of my little finger. They are green, then they turn red. They are skin-tingling hot. If, like me, you are foolish enough to work barehanded when you slice open one of these peppers and remove its seeds, you will pay. You will absent-mindedly scratch your cheek with your pepper-contaminated fingers, and suddenly it will feel as if a colony of fire ants were stinging your skin.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | March 30, 1994
Southwestern cuisine is trendy. Practically overnight it jumped from cafes in Santa Fe, N.M., into restaurants throughout the nation, then into home kitchens.If you like cooking the hot stuff, but you're having trouble finding just the right chili pepper for a recipe, the Old Southwest Trading Co., a mail-order retailer in Albuquerque, N.M., offers a catalog for ordering dozens of Southwest items.The company offers a wide assortment of dried chilies, including more than a dozen exotic chilies, and will ship fresh New Mexico green chilies during fresh chili season.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | November 3, 1993
Up to now, if you've wanted to order hot sauces, barbecue sauces, jerk marinades and other spicy foods by mail, Mo Hotta -- Mo Betta in San Luis Obispo, Calif., was where you turned.But now it's got competition. Javier "Papo" Muniz, a musician with a degree in sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Warren "Willy" Rosen, an artist and chef from Minneapolis, have teamed up to produce the Blazing Chile Bros. catalog.Based in Aptos, Santa Cruz County, they've assembled some 120 products, including Devil Drops, a rare sauce made from the datil pepper in St. Augustine, Fla.; Capital Punishment pepper sauce ("Once the bottle is opened, not even a call from the governor can save you")
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,The Dallas Morning News | September 5, 1993
Some chilies add a little spice to your food. Other chilies make you cry, take your breath away.When chili-lover Rudy Roberson ate his first habanero -- one of the world's hottest chilies -- the heat was so intense he nearly fainted.Most people would avoid such incendiary peppers. Others crave the heat. Pepper fiends like Mr. Roberson don't even flinch at jalapenos. He's addicted to the big guns."I especially like the Scotch bonnet," says Mr. Roberson, whose Louisiana-born mother gave him an early taste of spicy food.
FEATURES
By Cathy Barber and Cathy Barber,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | May 30, 1993
Talk about the point of no return: You've put too much chili pepper in the chili.The pain blazes through your mouth like wildfire until it feels as though your head will explode.Don't reach for water; instead, try milk.Dairy products are the best treatment for a mouth afire, says Albuquerque, N.M., chili expert Dave DeWitt. That's why you find side dishes containing yogurt in Indian cuisine, creamy iced coffee in Thai restaurants and sour cream on your enchiladas."There are two factors that control the amount of heat," Mr. DeWitt says.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
A recipe for jambalaya, using chicken, sausage and shrimp, was the request of Susan Rohleder of Amherst, N.H.Kirk Kraft of Baltimore responded with a recipe that uses ckicken stock rather than chicken. "I hope this jambalaya recipe isn't too spicy for our reader in New Hampshire," he wrote. "The habanero pepper can be eliminated."JambalayaServes 62 cups uncooked rice4 cups canned chicken stock6 slices bacon, diced1 to 1 1/4 pounds shrimp1 tablespoon Old Bay seasoning1 pound Spanish sausage (chorizo)
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