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NEWS
December 30, 2005
BEIJING -- China confirmed its third human death from bird flu yesterday, saying a 41-year-old woman from the country's southeast succumbed to the virulent H5N1 strain. The woman died Dec. 21, two weeks after falling ill, the official Xinhua News Agency said. Lab tests confirmed the infection. It was unclear how the woman, a factory worker in Sanming, a city in coastal Fujian province, contracted the virus. Doctors found no bird flu symptoms among people in close contact with her, and no outbreaks have been detected in animals in the area, Xinhua said.
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NEWS
December 27, 2011
Albert Einstein once said the reason he was able to accomplish so much was because he had "stood on the shoulders of giants" like Newton and Galileo. The Nobel Prize-winning physicist's remark was a reminder how much scientists depend on discoveries made by others. The system depends on the free and unfettered exchange of ideas, which is why the government's effort to restrict publication of research that it says could be used by terrorists has sparked a controversy over how to balance the need for openness against concerns that certain kinds of information might be misused.
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NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 2, 2006
MOSCOW -- The dangerous strain of bird flu known as H5N1 has killed nearly half a million domestic fowl in southern Russia in the past month despite efforts to control the outbreak by culling poultry, the Emergency Situations Ministry said yesterday. About 495,000 birds near the Caspian and Black seas have died since Feb. 3 from the virulent strain of bird flu, which can also infect humans, said a ministry spokesman, Viktor Beltsov. Another 220,000 birds were killed in an attempt to stem the outbreak, he said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 20, 2007
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first bird flu vaccine for humans this week, saying it could serve as a stop-gap tool to slow a pandemic despite its modest effectiveness. "This is a sort of interim measure," said Norman Baylor, director of the FDA's Office of Vaccines Research and Review in Rockville. In clinical trials, the vaccine for the H5N1 strain of bird flu provoked an immune response in 45 percent of people. By contrast, vaccines for a seasonal flu protect 70 percent to 90 percent of those who get a shot, according to the FDA. The bird flu vaccine, made by Sanofi Pasteur of Swiftwater, Pa., has other drawbacks.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
The University of Maryland School of Medicine and two other institutions next week will begin human tests of a vaccine designed to combat avian influenza - widely feared for its potential to cause the next global pandemic . The vaccine is designed to prevent a flu strain known officially as H5N1, which jumped from birds to humans after it was first identified in Hong Kong in 1997. Since then, there have been at least 69 confirmed cases and 46 deaths, none in the United States. Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told microbiologists gathered in Baltimore yesterday that the government has stockpiled the equivalent of 2 million doses of the untested H5N1 vaccine at a cost of $13 million in case of an outbreak here or overseas.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 2004
HONG KONG - Health officials announced yesterday that tests had confirmed more cases of Asia's twin health threats this winter, bird flu and SARS. China said two people previously categorized as suspected cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome had been reclassified as confirmed cases. Vietnam said four more people had fallen ill with the H5N1 strain of flu spreading through Asian poultry. World Health Organization officials said they had not confirmed either the additional Vietnamese bird flu cases or the reclassified Chinese SARS cases, and needed more information.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 2005
ROME -- As bird culls to control probable new outbreaks of bird flu started on farms in Russia and Macedonia, U.N. officials here warned yesterday that their far larger concern was that the virus was on its way to East Africa, where the disease could be nearly impossible to control. As bird flu has jumped this year from Southeast Asia to China, Russia, Kazakhstan and - more recently - into the Balkan region of Europe, scientists have become somewhat belatedly convinced that wild migratory birds are one of the main carriers of the H5N1 strain of avian influenza.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2004
HONG KONG - A dead peregrine falcon found near two chicken farms here had the avian influenza virus, agricultural officials said yesterday. The falcon is the first sign that the disease spreading in chicken flocks in Vietnam, South Korea and Japan might also be present in China. Hong Kong said it would respond by stepping up the monitoring of chicken farms for the disease, with inspections continuing through the Chinese New Year beginning today. World Health Organization officials have been very alarmed about the spread of the influenza virus, the A(H5N1)
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 3, 2005
MOSCOW - A strain of avian influenza virus that can be lethal to humans has spread from Southeast Asia to poultry flocks in Russia and Kazakhstan, a scientific journal reported yesterday, leading a British researcher to warn that the virus may be approaching Europe. "If we are seeing an expansion in range, that is something we should be concerned about," Ian Brown, head of avian virology at the United Kingdom Veterinary Laboratories Agency, told the journal Nature in an article published yesterday on its Web site.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
As spring approaches in the Northern Hemisphere and millions of birds begin their ancient long-distance migrations, scientific evidence is mounting that the deadly Asian strain of H5N1 "bird flu" virus is flying with them. If so, the virus may soon wing its way into Alaska - where biologists are establishing an unprecedented surveillance network as part of an aggressive, $29 million early warning campaign with a new focus on birds in the wild. Until now, scientists' greatest focus has been on domestic flocks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 2007
The first vaccine against avian flu for the United States was endorsed by a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel yesterday, but merely as a stopgap until better vaccines are developed. The experimental vaccine, made by Sanofi-Pasteur, protected only 45 percent of the 91 people on whom it was tested. Reaching even that level of protection required 12 times the dose of antigen delivered by a typical flu shot and had to be given in two shots several weeks apart. It is based on a virus strain that was circulating in Vietnam three years ago. Dr. Robert Couch said panel members knew of better vaccines in development, "but this is the only vaccine we had in front of us."
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
As spring approaches in the Northern Hemisphere and millions of birds begin their ancient long-distance migrations, scientific evidence is mounting that the deadly Asian strain of H5N1 "bird flu" virus is flying with them. If so, the virus may soon wing its way into Alaska - where biologists are establishing an unprecedented surveillance network as part of an aggressive, $29 million early warning campaign with a new focus on birds in the wild. Until now, scientists' greatest focus has been on domestic flocks.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 2, 2006
MOSCOW -- The dangerous strain of bird flu known as H5N1 has killed nearly half a million domestic fowl in southern Russia in the past month despite efforts to control the outbreak by culling poultry, the Emergency Situations Ministry said yesterday. About 495,000 birds near the Caspian and Black seas have died since Feb. 3 from the virulent strain of bird flu, which can also infect humans, said a ministry spokesman, Viktor Beltsov. Another 220,000 birds were killed in an attempt to stem the outbreak, he said.
NEWS
December 30, 2005
BEIJING -- China confirmed its third human death from bird flu yesterday, saying a 41-year-old woman from the country's southeast succumbed to the virulent H5N1 strain. The woman died Dec. 21, two weeks after falling ill, the official Xinhua News Agency said. Lab tests confirmed the infection. It was unclear how the woman, a factory worker in Sanming, a city in coastal Fujian province, contracted the virus. Doctors found no bird flu symptoms among people in close contact with her, and no outbreaks have been detected in animals in the area, Xinhua said.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 4, 2005
Hats off to the people in the Delmarva poultry industry. They have developed what the state Department of Agriculture is calling the nation's first plan to control an outbreak of avian influenza and prevent its spread to humans. A form of avian influenza - called H5N1 - has been infecting millions of poultry, migratory birds and farm animals in Southeast Asia since 2003. The virus has infected more than 100 people in Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and Indonesia, killing more than 50. Although the H5NI variety has not been found in the United States, there was an outbreak of another strain of avian flu on the Eastern Shore last year.
NEWS
By GADY A. EPSTEIN and GADY A. EPSTEIN,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
HEFANGKOU, China -- For two months now, as the news in China about avian flu has become steadily more alarming, Cao Jiancang has slept just fine at night, a few feet away from about 200 of his youngest chickens. The chicken farmer moved the chicks into his cozy brick shack to keep them safe from aggressive weasels lurking on his mountainside farm on the rural outskirts of Beijing. Local officials have visited him twice since then to help him inoculate all 3,000 of his chickens against bird flu, but the weasels worry Cao more than the flu. The Communist Party can manage the latter, he said, including the seemingly overwhelming task of vaccinating all the poultry in the country, as the government this week announced it would do. "I think that they definitely can do it," Cao said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 2004
The avian influenza virus that has spread widely among poultry and other birds in Southeast Asia and infected some people there has also crossed another species barrier to infect cats, and can be spread among them as well, Dutch scientists have found. The finding is "extraordinary because domestic cats are generally considered to be resistant to disease from influenza A virus infection," like that of the avian strain, the researchers are reporting in today's issue of the journal Science.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 20, 2007
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first bird flu vaccine for humans this week, saying it could serve as a stop-gap tool to slow a pandemic despite its modest effectiveness. "This is a sort of interim measure," said Norman Baylor, director of the FDA's Office of Vaccines Research and Review in Rockville. In clinical trials, the vaccine for the H5N1 strain of bird flu provoked an immune response in 45 percent of people. By contrast, vaccines for a seasonal flu protect 70 percent to 90 percent of those who get a shot, according to the FDA. The bird flu vaccine, made by Sanofi Pasteur of Swiftwater, Pa., has other drawbacks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 2005
ROME -- As bird culls to control probable new outbreaks of bird flu started on farms in Russia and Macedonia, U.N. officials here warned yesterday that their far larger concern was that the virus was on its way to East Africa, where the disease could be nearly impossible to control. As bird flu has jumped this year from Southeast Asia to China, Russia, Kazakhstan and - more recently - into the Balkan region of Europe, scientists have become somewhat belatedly convinced that wild migratory birds are one of the main carriers of the H5N1 strain of avian influenza.
NEWS
October 7, 2005
A 12-foot-long great white shark has made what scientists are calling the fastest-known round-trip ocean migration by a marine animal. The female shark, dubbed P12, was fitted with a satellite radio transmitter on Nov. 7, 2003, off Gansbaai, South Africa. She turned up 99 days later off the northwest coast of Australia, 6,900 miles away. En route, she made frequent dives to 3,200 feet, into 38-degree water. Her average speed - 2.9 mph - is the fastest sustained, long-distance speed known among sharks, scientists said.
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