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Gypsy Moth

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NEWS
April 28, 2002
Aerial spraying of insecticides to protect the state's hardwood forests and shade trees from damage by gypsy moth caterpillars will begin in certain areas of Central, Southern and Northeast Maryland tomorrow. Spraying will continue in early May in Western Maryland. Trees in each area - a total of about 39,616 acres - will be treated one time from the air during the roughly two-week period just after caterpillars hatch and begin to eat leaves. Trees in specific areas of Anne Arundel and about 12 other counties, as well as Baltimore City and some parks, will be sprayed.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The eggs of a destructive foreign moth species that "poses a significant threat to our nation's forests and urban landscapes" were found aboard a carrier ship docked in Baltimore in mid-September, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Monday. Customs agents discovered six masses of Asian Gypsy Moth eggs during a Sept. 16 inspection of the Columbia Highway, a vehicle carrier that had made port calls in Japan in June and July, the border agency said. Females of the species can travel 25 miles per day and "can lay egg masses that could yield hundreds of hungry caterpillars," the agency said.
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NEWS
February 24, 1991
A gypsy moth spraying operation will be conducted in April and May focusing on the forested areas in the Aberdeen and Edgewood areas.Aberdeen Proving Ground officials said its Directorate of Engineeringand Housing will conduct the spraying program.The pesticide bacillus thuringiensis will be used to kill the insect, which defoliates and kills forest and shade trees.The Army last year sprayed 9,000 acres on the proving ground to control the gypsy moths. Officials estimate that the spraying protected 90 percent of the foliage and reduced the moth population by 80 percent.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | October 5, 2008
Based on preliminary information from pest management officials with the state Department of Agriculture, the shade trees in your yard are less likely to fall victim to voracious caterpillars next year than in the recent past. The state reports that a naturally occurring fungus caused by wet spring weather, along with the Agriculture Department's effective suppression program, has resulted in a decline in gypsy moth defoliation this fall as compared with last year. State officials also expect less of an attack by the leaf-eating caterpillars next year.
NEWS
May 18, 1993
Thank goodness for Maryland that the gypsy moth caterpillar doesn't have an assassin's sense of timing to accompany its voracious appetite.When the leaf-eating invader was most prolific in Maryland in 1990, this state had a healthy budget to fight it; of the 16 or so states most damaged by the gypsy moth, Maryland was second in 1990 in acres sprayed (and defoliated).The critter isn't as prevalent here today. That's good, because the recession has gobbled its own path through state and county budgets.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | November 20, 1990
Though entomologists warned that we're not out of the woods yet, surveys released yesterday gave the first indication that Anne Arundel County may be on the right path toward controlling its gypsy moth population.The annual count taken each fall to determine the number of egg masses per acre appear to indicate that gypsy moth populations are stabilizing in the areas sprayed last May."Judging from the data, I believe we made the biggest impact ever this year in Anne Arundel County, and you may see things leveling off from now on," said Sally Hughes, regional entomologist for the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | November 21, 1990
Odenton tonight is preparing for an invasion that is at least five months away.No, it's not an army of developers who plan to tear up the countryside, but rather an army of caterpillars who threaten to eat it up."We've had a lot of problems with gypsy moth caterpillars this past summer," said Pat Wellford, president of the Greater Odenton Improvement Association.So the association invited Richard Olsen, the Anne Arundel County gypsy moth coordinator, to its meeting tonight in the Odenton Fire Hall.
NEWS
By Luther Young | April 13, 1991
Maryland's annual spraying program for the gypsy moth caterpillar is about to get under way, amid predictions that a natural lull in the pest's boom-and-bust population cycle will limit statewide tree damage this year.But property owners concerned about individual trees should act now to protect them with sticky barriers against the leaf-eating caterpillars that are just beginning to emerge in the warm spring weather, according to the Maryland Department of Agriculture."If you're going to do it, this weekend is about the latest you can wait," said Robert H. Tichenor Jr., chief of forest pest management.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | January 11, 1993
Richard Olsen, county gypsy moth program coordinator, will be the guest speaker at the Linthicum-Shipley Improvement Association general meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, at Linthicum Elementary School.Mr. Olsen will discuss the gypsy moth egg masses that the Maryland Department of Agriculture has found in the northwest area of Linthicum Heights, behind the homes on Woodland, Maple and Kingwood roads and Edric Drive.The department's study recommends that the area should be treated and that Linthicum should be considered for the 1993 Gypsy Moth Program, if the community association is interested.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | May 3, 1993
The county will spray about 61 acres of Linthicum for gypsy moth caterpillars in the next week or so. The actual date will be dependent on the weather, foliage and active feeding of the caterpillars.The designated area is west of Longcross Road and north of Shipley Road. Six wooded acres at the end of Woodland and Groveland roads will also be sprayed.Residents may call 222-7669 for a recorded message of the exact date of spraying for the area designated as Sprayblock 8.The spray is nontoxic to humans or pets, but it is recommended that residents remain indoors during the approximately 10 minutes it takes to spray.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | May 10, 2008
Maryland is doubling its effort to kill gypsy moths, an invasive Eurasian pest that defoliated tens of thousands of acres of trees across the state last year. Airplanes are spraying pesticides on about 100,000 acres of trees in Baltimore County, Western Maryland and elsewhere. It's a $4 million project that state officials hope will beat back an egg-laying spree last year by the leaf-munching menaces. "There are a lot of gypsy moths out there, and we are trying to suppress them so people don't have to deal with them in their parks or homes," said Steve Tilley, an entomologist at the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld | April 12, 2008
I want to support our local farms by purchasing Maryland-grown produce that's fresh and hasn't added to pollution by being hauled long distances. Isn't there some kind of program that partners people with farms? Community Supported Agriculture is a new idea in farming. Members, or "share holders," choose a farm in the program, pay for a stake and share in the farm's bounty of produce for the growing season from spring through fall. Many of these farms are certified organic. Go to marylandagricul ture.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | January 26, 2008
Are gypsy moths coming back? I didn't see any on my oaks last year. Gypsy moths never leave entirely, but their numbers were knocked down for years by a beneficial fungal disease, plus aerial spray programs. The fungus is not effective in dry weather, and last year we had a dry spring. Many parts of Maryland were hit hard with gypsy moth defoliation. If we have a dry spring this year, expect a huge increase in gypsy moths. To prepare, scout your property this winter for their tan felt-like 1 1/2 -inch egg masses.
NEWS
October 25, 2007
Man gets 30 years for killing deputies A man who shot and killed two sheriff's deputies in 2002 has pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree murder. James Logan was sentenced yesterday to 30 years in prison. Logan shot Prince George's County Sheriff's Deputies Elizabeth Magruder and James Arnaud when they went to his parents' Adelphi home to take him into custody. The deputies had a warrant to take Logan in for a court-ordered psychiatric evaluation. Logan confessed to the crime, but his lawyers argued that he should be acquitted because of mental illness.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | July 6, 2007
Brown larvae, sprouting hairs as long as false eyelashes, swarm all over Mike Richardson's porch. Next door, at Mount Zion United Methodist Church in northern Baltimore County, the ugly invaders tumble from doorways onto the heads of parishioners, drop a rain of waste and strip all the leaves from trees. This denuded hillside in Freeland is one of several areas defoliated by gypsy moths this year as Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and other Eastern states suffer the worst damage from the ravenous insects in more than a decade.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | June 24, 2007
Once again, Maryland trees are under attack by creepy crawlers. Unlike the voracious emerald ash borer that is blamed for the destruction of 25,000 ash trees in Prince George's County this year, the new invader has an appetite for an array of trees -- oak, apple, American beech, birch, sweet gum, willow and hawthorn. This time it is the gypsy moth doing the damage, unleashing the worst infestation in Maryland in 12 years, state agriculture officials say. The damage spans 12 counties, all of the counties of the Baltimore metropolitan area and running from Cecil to Garrett.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | September 16, 1991
More spraying, stronger bug juice and a nasty caterpillar virus combined to substantially reduce the defoliation of gypsy moths in the county this summer.State surveyors reported last week that 2,163 acres of hardwoods were defoliated by gypsy moth caterpillars this summer, down from 7,440 last year and 3,684 in 1989, the first year the county had any substantial defoliation.The bad news was that almost all of the defoliation was heavy, meaning more than half a tree's leaves were destroyed -- enough to killa tree in a drought season, said Robert Tichenor, chief of forest pest management for the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | November 1, 1990
Severna Forest is petitioning to become the county's first community to impose a gypsy moth-control tax.If Severna Forest Community Association vice president Albert Johnston can get the OK from more than half of the 170 homeowners in his development, and if the petition clears the public hearing process, those residents will see a $15 increase tacked on to their property tax bills next July."
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | June 23, 2007
I never heard of gypsy moths on blue spruce, but they're eating the top of mine! What do I spray? It's too prickly to band. Gypsy moths are back, and spruce is a new target. It's too late this year to spray with Bt, the recommended insecticide. Right now, shade tree owners should install burlap bands on trunks where caterpillars can hide and be destroyed daily. Before next April, you can scrape egg masses off trees, buildings and any other place the females found handy. Do not inhale the irritating tiny hairs covering the egg mass.
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