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Gwynns Falls

NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2004
Baltimore city and county officials will release the preliminary findings of a nine-month study of the Gwynns Falls watershed tonight as part of an unprecedented partnership to improve water quality in streams that feed the Chesapeake Bay. The report is a detailed account of soil erosion and pollution in a stream system that runs from the Glyndon area of Baltimore County through the west side of the city and into the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River....
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2000
The city Planning Commission voted unanimously yesterday to defer action on the final development plan for a disputed Northwest Baltimore subdivision until the Department of Public Works comments on the project's environmental impact on the Gwynns Falls. After a testy, 3 1/2 -hour meeting, seven of the nine commissioners voted. One was absent, and Chairman Peter E. Auchincloss recused himself because he is president of Dickeyville Community Association Inc., which opposes the development sought by Hillsdale Heights Neighborhood Association.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 9, 2012
In the heart of a little Southwest Baltimore neighborhood are signs saying "Welcome to Wellesley Park" and "Sustain us love. " It goes by the name of Gwynns Falls, and its rowhouses sit tucked behind a bunch of businesses, including a paint brush factory, Carroll Awning and A-1 Three Brothers auto repair, which front on busy Frederick Avenue. When I approached them, I saw how tidy Stafford, Sunset and Longwood streets were. I soon learned that the Gwynns Falls enclave had recently won a $5,000 city-sponsored award for the cleanest community in its quadrant of the city.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1995
The plan to encourage Baltimoreans to walk or bike from Leakin Park in the Northwest corner of the city to Camden Yards without having to cross a street may be stymied if money is not found to fully fund the project.The $8 million Gwynns Falls Trail park unveiled last night at the Baltimore Museum of Art has funding locked up only for the first three miles in the 14-mile project. The next two phases, scheduled to be completed in five years, are up in the air because a federal grant may not become available after the first phase is done.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | April 23, 1993
The sun didn't shine, but the Earth might have smiled some yesterday as about 250 teen-agers cleaned a bit of its face along Gwynns Falls near Leakin Park.On a chilling spring morning, students from five area all-girl schools and the city's Southwestern High School sloshed through mud and muck to clean up a largely forgotten -- or perhaps unknown -- stretch of land along the falls in Northwest Baltimore.Their work marked not only Earth Day, but also two beginnings: the first physical labor on a proposed "greenway" recreation area through the city, and the first environmental project by area members of the National Coalition of Girls' Schools.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
M. Jastrow Levin, a retired high school science teacher whose interest in nature and advocacy of the Gwynns Falls Valley earned him the nickname Mr. Leakin Park, died of complications from a circulation ailment and congestive heart failure Monday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 95. A city native, Mr. Levin had been a lifelong resident of the Walbrook and Fairmont sections of West Baltimore until moving to Roland Park Place seven years ago. Born Marcus Jastrow Levin, he was the son of Louis H. Levin, executive secretary of the old Federated Jewish Charities, and Bertha Szold Levin, a member of the city school board.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
WHEN TALK BEGAN four years ago about creating a recreational greenway along the wasteland of the Gwynns Falls Valley, many dismissed the idea as stillborn. But there were also plenty of believers, who have been able to sell their vision about a 14-mile system of trails stretching from Leakin Park's Franklintown to the Inner Harbor.If all goes as planned, the construction of the first section -- a 4.5-mile stretch -- will begin next winter. Meanwhile, design work for the second phase is beginning.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
THE OPENING of the first leg of the 14-mile Gwynns Falls Trail is cause for celebration. In a city where recreation and parks activities are constantly under threat of budget cuts, this joint project of the nonprofit Trust for Public Land and the municipal government is an unusual achievement.The paved pathway makes much of 2,000-acre Leakin Park accessible to the public for the first time since the devastation of Tropical Storm Agnes in 1972.The 4.5-mile first leg runs from the western end of Franklintown Road, near Winans Way, to Leon Day Park.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
The Trust for Public Land, a nonprofit conservation group, has helped the city buy 3.27 acres of land in West Baltimore near the entrance to the planned Gwynns Falls Trail.The vacant land, off Swann Avenue in the Hunting Ridge neighborhood, will be a buffer for part of the 14-mile trail.Area residents are "pleased that as much parkland as possible is being preserved near our neighborhoods and that development will be limited," said Edward Orser, a longtime Hunting Ridge resident.The city purchased the land recently from the Archdiocese of Baltimore for $37,500, using money from the state Program Open Space, said Debi Osborne, a spokesman for the Trust for Public Land who negotiated the purchase for the city.
NEWS
December 2, 1997
AFTER YEARS of brainstorming and fund-raising, today marks the groundbreaking for a 4.5-mile asphalt trail along stream valleys in West Baltimore's Leakin and Gwynns Falls parks.If everything goes as planned, that new walking, bicycling and line skating path will eventually stretch nearly 15 miles, connecting Dickeyville and Windsor Hills to the Inner Harbor and Middle Branch.Today's ceremony is cause for jubilation. For the first time since the two parks were devastated by Tropical Storm Agnes in the summer of 1972, they are about to become accessible to the public.
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